• Mikhail Svetlov/Getty Images(JERUSALEM) -- Israeli police on Tuesday recommended indicting Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in two corruption investigations, a move that could lead to the first indictments after months of corruption investigations focusing on the prime minister and his family.Israeli police said in a statement they had "sufficient evidence" against the prime minister in both cases "for the offense of accepting bribes, fraud and breach of trust."Israeli police alleged Netanyahu received at least 1 million shekels, around $283,000, in lavish gifts and bribes.Case 1,000 alleges that Netanyahu accepted gifts from wealthy patrons in return for advancing their interests. In so-called Case 2,000, Netanyahu is accused of striking a deal with Israel's second largest newspaper, Yedioth Ahronoth, to provide him with positive coverage in return for damaging the reputation of Israel Hayom, a free newspaper in Israel.Case 1,000 names two wealthy businessmen, an Israeli Hollywood producer and an Australian businessman. In regards to the producer, the police said they had evidence for accepting bribes, fraud and breach of trust. With respect to the businessman, the police only named fraud and breach of trust.The police also added it had sufficient evidence of bribery to charge the producer, too.Netanyahu blasted the development in a televised address this evening."I have not known a day in office without vicious allegations against me and my family," he said. "Fifteen investigations have been launched against me. I know the truth. This time as well, it will end in nothing."Netanyahu indicated he was committed to remaining prime minister."Nothing will divert me from my commitment to the good of the nation," he said. "I feel a deep commitment to continue to lead this people."Last week, the embattled prime minister took to Facebook to criticize the police, calling the claims "ludicrous." He also attacked the credibility of the investigation after Israel Police Chief Roni Alshiech insinuated Netanyahu may have hired private investigators to follow those involved in the investigation.He has repeatedly denied any wrongdoing, saying more than once "there will be nothing, because there is nothing."Tuesday's recommendations are just that, recommendations, and while they are damaging politically and will certainly fuel calls for the prime minister to step down, the real decision to charge the prime minister lies with Israel's attorney general. Only a conviction with the charge of moral turpitude would legally force Netanayahu to step down.By making the recommendations, though, the police are signaling they believe there is enough evidence to charge Netanyahu.The police's reported recommendations would now go to Attorney General Avihai Mendelblit, who will decide whether to file charges. This process could take months.
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  • Kevin Hagen/Getty Images(SOUTH AFRICA) -- The African National Congress, the party of the late Nelson Mandela and the ruling party in South Africa, has ordered the country's president, Jacob Zuma, to hand in his resignation, though giving him no deadline to do so.The party’s secretary general, Ace Magashule, made the announcement at a news conference today after a marathon special ANC National Executive Committee meeting outside Pretoria that lasted into the early hours.The executive committee had reportedly resolved to give Zuma the option to resign or be recalled.Although Zuma indicated his willingness to resign, Magashule said, he wanted a grace period of between three and six months to step down, which the executive committee rejected.When Cyril Ramaphosa, South Africa’s deputy president who also heads the ANC, went to see Zuma Monday night, the president reportedly said: "Do what you want to do."Ramaphosa has been in ongoing discussions with Zuma to negotiate an exit plan while South Africans waited with bated breath.Last week saw the unprecedented cancellation of the State of the Nation address that was scheduled for Thursday.Opposition parties Monday called for the dissolution of Parliament and fresh elections to be held to elect a new president.It’s unclear when Zuma will resign. Officials have not given him a deadline, Magashule said, but are “leaving it to him to do the right thing.”Zuma stands accused of more than 780 charges of fraud, money laundering and racketeering related to an arms deal scandal. Although he has consistently denied the charges, prosecutors are gearing up to reinstate them. The beleaguered president was also found by the highest court in South Africa to have failed in his duty to uphold, defend and respect the country’s Constitution after making improvements to his private homestead with taxpayers’ money.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • ABC News(SEOUL, South Korea) -- Thursday night in Itaewon, the hippest district in Seoul, the leader of the communist state to the north begins his march.But take a closer look. It's not actually Kim Jong-un. Instead, it's a cheerful South Korean impersonator.An English instructor during the day, Dragon Kim ventures out at night to some of the most crowded streets of Seoul dressed as the supreme leader.He boasts dance moves and mimics the motions of the real Kim Jong-un. People stare at him first in awe and then out of curiosity. When they figure out he's an imitator, they laugh and ask to take a selfie together.Kim began this one-man show for Halloween in 2014, when he first showed up as Kim Jong-un and attracted attention from social media. He has been hanging out in his hermit-leader costume ever since. Some people recognize him as "Itaewon Kim Jong-un," and he cherishes the attention."Not only just people are happy about what I'm doing," Kim told ABC News, "but I'm also happy because it is really fun to see how people react."Kim says he has a lot in common with Kim Jong-un -- not only their looks but a taste for American food and a passion for basketball. He dreams that one day the two men will be able to play basketball together.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- An 81-year old American citizen who was released from the hospital back to a notorious Iranian prison has been hospitalized again, with growing concerns that he could die in Iranian custody.Baquer Namazi has been held by Iran for nearly two years after he was trying to visit and secure the release of his son Siamak Namazi, who has been detained by Iran since fall 2015. They are two of the six Americans missing or detained in Iran -- with a new case revealed this past weekend.The elder Namazi, a retired UNICEF official, was rushed again to the hospital late Sunday night with an irregular heartbeat, severe depletion of energy and fluctuations of his blood pressure, according to his lawyer Jared Genser. This latest trip is Baquer Namazi's second to a hospital in the past two weeks and his fifth while in custody. He has a history of heart problems, including an emergency surgery to install a pacemaker while in custody last September.Before he was returned to Evin Prison last Tuesday, his family, his lawyer, and the State Department urged Iran to release him on humanitarian grounds. His doctor said that the prison's conditions are the primary reason for his declining health -- and the day after he was returned, he was unable to walk because of a severe drop in blood pressure and depletion of energy, Genser said.Last week, Under Secretary of State for Public Affairs and Public Diplomacy Steve Goldstein warned that if Baquer Namazi was returned to prison, he could die. "We are concerned about that, and we would hope the Iranians would be concerned about that, too," he told reporters.The State Department has no comment on this latest hospitalization. Baquer Namazi's other son Babak Namazi released a statement, saying, "I beg the authorities to let him stay at home on parole on humanitarian grounds. It is obvious that if they do not, he could die at any time."Iranian officials didn't comment Monday on Baquer Namazi or his hospitalization but have consistently denied that the government arbitrarily arrests Americans.Baquer and Siamak Namazi, a 46-year old businessman, are both serving 10-year sentences for spying for the U.S. -- charges that they have denied.But they are not the only American citizens held by Iran. Xiyue Wang, a history Ph.D. candidate at Princeton University, was arrested in August 2016 and sentenced to a 10-year sentence one year later on espionage charges. His wife, Hua Qu, told ABC News in December that she fears for his life, as he is held in Evin Prison's Ward 7, where he was previously beaten by another prisoner.There is also the case of art gallery owner Karan Vafadari, an American citizen who was about to travel with his wife, Afarin Niasari, a green card-holder, to a family wedding in July 2016 when they were detained. No public charges have ever been brought against them, but they remain in custody.Former FBI agent Robert Levinson is also missing in Iran since 2007 -- the longest-held U.S. civilian, according to a Senate resolution passed two years ago Sunday. Iran denies that he is in the government's custody.Over the weekend, it was revealed that another American citizen is now also in detention. Morad Tahbaz is one of 10 environmentalists with the Persian Heritage Wildlife Foundation that were arrested in January and charged with spying, according to the Center for Human Rights in Iran. The State Department would not confirm Tahbaz's detention, citing privacy concerns, but said they are "aware of reports that a U.S. citizen has been detained in Iran."One of the environmentalists -- a 63-year-old Canadian citizen and university professor named Kavous Seyed-Emami -- committed suicide over the weekend, his son Ramin, a musician known as King Raam, revealed on Twitter Saturday."The rising number of deaths in Iranian prisons is an unfolding tragedy that must stop now," said Hadi Ghaemi, the executive director of the Center for Human Rights in Iran, in a statement. "In addition t
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  • Purestock/Thinkstock(PRETORIA, South Africa) -- South African police are trying to identify a suspected poacher who was reportedly killed and partially devoured by lions in a private game reserve near the Kruger National Park.The man’s mauled remains, including his head, were reportedly found Monday alongside a hunting rifle and ammunition."The process of identifying the deceased has already commenced and it might be made possible by the fact that his head is amongst the remains that were found at the scene,” South African Police Service spokesman Lt. Col. Moatshe Ngoepe told the country’s News24.Ngoepe added: “We are now waiting for a person from the family but we are also utilizing our investigative resources to see if we can successfully identify the deceased."Ngoepe told Agence France-Presse news agency: “It seems the victim was poaching in the game park when he was attacked and killed by lions. They ate his body, nearly all of it, and just left his head and some remains.”The Department of Home Affairs has also been asked in to assist in identifying the man.It’s unclear whether the man was in the Ingwelala Private Game Reserve to specifically poach lions. Although lion poaching has been on the increase in recent years, the region has historically seen higher levels of rhino poaching, which is a more lucrative animal to kill illegally.In parts of Asia, the horn is in high demand, where it's used as an ineffective form of alternative medicine or carved into works of art.A year ago a man was mauled and killed by white lions in the same region after they escaped from their enclosure.Several lions were found poisoned near a farm in the same province last year with their heads and paws sawed off. Lion body parts are used in traditional medicine.
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  • Grand Central Publishing(NEW YORK) -- Before Meghan Markle, Wallis Simpson was the first American divorcee to marry into the British royal family.While Simpson has been a figure of intrigue for decades, her recent portrayal in the Netflix hit show "The Crown" and the many comparisons between her and Markle have thrust her story back into the public eye.Historian Andrew Morton's latest book "Wallis in Love" paints a new image of the American socialite, arguing that the Duchess of Windsor was in love with another man during her marriage to Edward VIII.Morton also argues that Simpson was only in love with Edward VII's title. When Edward VIII told Simpson that he abdicated the throne for her, Morton says she called him a "fool," writing that the exchange was heard by the French secret police who were monitoring their phone calls between the South of France and England during that time.Morton claims that Herman Rogers, who Simpson met while she was living abroad in China, was the love of her life, and that her public life and marriage with Edward VIII was a charade.When Rogers married his second wife Lucy Wann, Wallis reportedly gave the couple an engraved silver tray with only his name on it as a wedding present.Morton also writes that Wann was terrified that Simpson would leave Edward VIII for Rogers, and at one point even told her, "You have got your king, but I have got your Herman," knowing how much Rogers meant to Simpson.Another revelation about Simpson and Edward VIII in the book is that the couple were in close, but secret, contact with Nazis during World War II, whom they enlisted to look after their homes in France.Morton writes that Simpson and Edward VIII hated the rest of the British royal family until their deaths because Simpson was never given the title "Her Royal Highness."By combing through diary entries, letters, never-before-published records and much more, Morton's depiction of Simpson sheds new light on the private life of the Duchess of Windsor.Morton told ABC News that many things have changed between the time when Wallis married Edward VIII and now, when another American divorcee is engaged to a British royal prince.While Edward VIII was forced to abdicate the throne in order to marry the woman he loved because the Church of England would not accept his decision to wed a divorced woman, Markle has so far been welcomed by the British royal family. Even before their marriage, Markle spent the Christmas holidays with Queen Elizabeth and the royal family at Sandringham.The historian argues that by witnessing the lives of these two American women, one can see how clearly times have changed to become more tolerant."Wallis in Love" hits bookstores nationwide on Feb. 13.
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