• Korea Summit Press Pool/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- North Korea has vowed this week to dismantle their nuclear testing facility at Punggye-ri in front of the world’s media, the latest sign of goodwill in the rapidly developing detente on the Korean Peninsula.North Korean news agency KCNA previously announced that foreign media would be invited to cover the event to show the process in a "transparent manner."Though in the last week there have been some heated threats from North Korean officials to pull out of the upcoming June 12 summit with President Donald Trump, it appears that North Korean leader Kim Jong Un is still going ahead with closing down his nuclear testing facility.Kim announced in April that he no longer needed to conduct nuclear tests because the country had achieved its "nuclear weaponization."Location
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(SANTA FE, Texas) -- She arrived from halfway around the globe but 17-year-old Sabika Sheikh was determined to bring her native Pakistan closer to America, the Texas family who took in the foreign exchange student told mourners at her funeral on Sunday.Politicians, religious leaders, and friends packed the Masjid al-Sabireen mosque in the Houston suburb of Stafford to celebrate the girl who was one of eight students and two teachers killed, allegedly by a 17-year-old classmate on Friday at their high school in Santa Fe, Texas."She was the most beautiful, loving person I've ever met," said Jaelyn Cogburn, whose family took in Sabika six months ago as part of the Youth Exchange and Study program sponsored by the U.S. State Department.Jaelyn told the mourners that she had been homeschooled up until this year and when she enrolled at Santa Fe High School, Sabika, who had yet to move into the Cogburn home, was the first friend she made."It was hard when I started school because I didn’t know anybody, but then I met Sabika and she didn't know anyone, either," said Jaelyn. "And we both became very close."She said Sabika was scheduled to return home in about three weeks and she was already feeling sad about her leaving."The other night we were going to our friend's house in a car and I was thinking about how she was about to go back to Pakistan and I was crying. No one saw me because I was in the dark. I was crying because I didn't want her to leave and she leaned over and she just said, 'I love you and I miss you,'" Jaelyn said."She was so loyal to her faith, her country and she only had good things to say about everybody. She loved her family. She couldn't wait to see them, and she loved us," Jaelyn added.Jaelyn's mother, Joleen Cogburn, recalled a conversation she had with Sabika when she first came to live in her home about what she wanted to accomplish as a foreign exchange student."I asked her how she got involved with wanting to become a foreign exchange student and why, and she said, 'Because I want to learn the American culture and I want America to lean the Pakistan culture and I want us to come together and unite,'" Cogburn said.She said she told Sabika how brave she was for being so young and leaving her family to come to America."I always told her, 'Sabika, you have a warrior's heart,'" she said. "She wanted to be a businesswoman and she said she wanted to impact the world, and I think she's done that."Her husband, Jason Cogburn, said that in the short time Sabika lived with them, she became as close as one of his daughters."We had no idea what God was going to send us, but he sent us one of the most precious gifts I've ever had in life," Jason Cogburn said.Despite coming from different cultures and religions, Sabika fit perfectly into his family, he said."We loved her and she loved us and we did things together," he said. "She wanted to be part of what we did and we wanted to be part of what she did."He said Sabika even started working in his family's seafood business."When we went to work, she went to work," Jason Cogburn said. "When she started Ramadan and started fasting, my family did that with her because we did things together."Sabika's funeral was the first of more to come.Also killed in the attack were students Shana Fisher, 16; Angelique Ramirez, 15; Christopher Jake Stone, 17; Jared Black, 17; Christian Riley Garcia, 15; Aaron Kyle McLeod; and Kimberly Vaughan. Two teachers, Glenda Perkins and Cynthia Tisdale, 64, were also killed.All their names were read at Sabika's funeral."We are still in a state of denial. We can’t believe it. It's like a nightmare," Sabika's father, Abdul Aziz Sheikh, told The Associated Press at his home in Karachi, Pakistan.He said he hopes his daughter's death doesn't stop other students from following in her footsteps."One should not lose his heart by such kind of incidents," he added. "One should not stop going for education to the U.S. or U.K., or China,
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  • Karwai Tang/WireImage(WINDSOR, England) -- The two designers of Meghan Markle's wedding dresses are finally speaking out after the bride walked down the aisle to wed Prince Harry Saturday inside St. George's Chapel in front of hundreds of relatives and guests.Markle, now known as the Duchess of Sussex, first wore a wedding gown, made out of triple silk organza, featuring an open bateau neckline with three-quarter-length sleeves.Her look, which was seen by millions watching around the world, was completed by her "something borrowed" -- Queen Mary's diamond bandeau tiara, which Queen Elizabeth loaned to Markle, complete with a flower-outlined veil that measured at 16 feet long.Clare Waight Keller, the first female artistic director to head the house of Givenchy, said in comments to the press just what the groom thought of his bride's look."He came straight up to me and he said, 'Oh my god, thank you! She looks absolutely stunning,'" Waight Keller, 47, recalled. "Well, I think everybody saw on television -- he was absolutely in awe, I think. She looked just incredible, and it showed.""So I think, for the both of them, they were just radiant at that time," she added.The British designer called the royal wedding a "dream day" in a post on Instagram.Keller, who accompanied Markle on her wedding day, also shared just what her role entailed."The moment they stepped out as the Duke and Duchess of Sussex," she said, "I was standing just inside making the final adjustments to the beautiful 5-meter veil before they descended the steps to their carriage."For the wedding receptions, Markle stepped out in another wedding gown -- this time designed by British designer Stella McCartney.The Duchess wore a silk crepe, floor-length gown with a high collar, according to Women's Wear Daily, which released sketches of the dress on Sunday. Markle completed her look by wearing "something blue" -- Aquazzura satin shoes with baby blue soles.“I am so proud and honored to have been chosen by the Duchess of Sussex to make her evening gown and represent British design," McCartney, 46, told the magazine. “It has truly been one of the most humbling moments of my career, and I am so proud of all the team on this stunning, sunny royal day.”The designers' comments about their memorable designs came as Kensington Palace released never-before-seen sketches of Markle's first wedding look."The Duchess and Ms. Waight Keller worked closely together on the design, epitomising a timeless minimal elegance referencing the codes of the iconic House of Givenchy," the palace added in a tweet.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • Nick Edwards/WPA Pool/Getty Images(WINDSOR, England) -- The royal wedding had no shortage of special moments as Prince Harry and Meghan Markle tied the Windsor knot inside St. George's Chapel today, and it even included a few unexpected moments that you may have missed!The dressMarkle was a vision in white as she walked down the aisle Saturday to greet Prince Harry.Her wedding gown, made out of triple silk organza, featured an open bateau neckline with three-quarter-length sleeves.It was designed by British designer Clare Waight Keller, 47, who became the first female artistic director to head the house of Givenchy."After meeting Ms. Waight Keller in early 2018, Ms. Markle chose to work with her for her timeless and elegant aesthetic, impeccable tailoring, and relaxed demeanour," a press release from Kensington Palace read. "Ms. Markle also wanted to highlight the success of a leading British talent who has now served as the creative head of three globally influential fashion houses -- Pringle of Scotland, Chloé, and now Givenchy."A solo walk down the aisleMarkle's mother, Doria Ragland, had escorted the bride to St. George's Chapel before Markle confidently walked the first half of the aisle on her own, followed by her bridesmaids and page boys.Prince Charles, the next King of England, then walked his new daughter-in-law down the second half of the aisle.Markle, 36, asked Prince Charles to walk her down the aisle because her father, Thomas Markle Sr., who lives in Mexico, did not attend the wedding due to health concerns.Most Rev. Michael Bruce Curry's passionate addressOne of the most memorable moments of the ceremony was the address delivered by the Most Rev. Michael Bruce Curry, who traveled to Windsor from Chicago.Curry, the head of the Episcopal Church, spoke passionately about the power of love and at one point quoted Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr."We must discover the power of love, the redemptive power of love. And when we do that, we will make of this old world a new world," he said. "Love is the only way. There's power in love. Don't underestimate it. Don't even over-sentimentalize it. There's power, power in love."The kissAs the couple -- who now hold the titles of Duke and Duchess of Sussex -- walked out of the floral arches of St. George's Chapel, they shared their first kiss as newlyweds.Princess Charlotte's scene-stealing momentAfter the wedding, 3-year-old Princess Charlotte gave her uncle and new aunt a wave as the carriage swept them away.The carriage processionThe wedding was followed by a carriage procession to give those gathered in Windsor an up-close look at the newlyweds.The beaming couple waved nonstop as they passed by the cheering crowds of adults and children who gathered from across the world.The American bride seemed touched by the outpouring of support, and at one point she placed her hand over her heart.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • Handout/Getty Images(WINDSOR, England) -- A young cellist named Sheku Kanneh-Mason impressed guests today, as he performed at the royal wedding ceremony just after Prince Harry and Meghan Markle were married.The 19-year-old, who played with the orchestra during the signing of the register, is also the winner of 2016's BBC Young Musician award, Kensington Palace reports."Last June, Prince Harry saw Sheku play at an event in London in support of the work of Antiguan charity the Halo Foundation," the Palace tweeted.Kanneh-Mason resides in the United Kingdom and this year, his debut album, "Inspiration," hit number 1 on the U.K. classical chart, according to his Twitter bio.Last Month, the musician gushed about how excited he was to perform at Harry and Markle's wedding."I was bowled over when Ms Markle called me to ask if I would play during the ceremony, and of course I immediately said yes!!!" Kanneh-Mason wrote. "What a privilege. I can’t wait!"Kannah-Mason grew up one of seven children and is currently a full-time scholarship student at The Associated Board of the Royal Schools of Music, according to his website. He began learning the cello when he was 6 years old.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • Owen Humphreys/WPA Pool/Getty Images(WINDSOR, England) -- It's safe to say that the royal wedding of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle was the most racially diverse ceremony of the British royal family in recent history.The couple, now the Duke and Duchess of Sussex, exchanged vows Saturday inside St. George's Chapel in England in front of about 600 guests, with another 2,000 outside on the grounds of Windsor Castle and millions more watching on TV around the world.The Most Rev. Michael Bruce Curry, the first black presiding bishop of the American Episcopal Church, spoke, quoting African-American civil rights icon Martin Luther King, Jr."We must discover the power of love, the redemptive power of love. And when we do that, we will make of this old world a new world," the bishop said. "Love is the only way. There's power in love. Don't underestimate it. Don't even over-sentimentalize it. There's power -- power in love."King's daughter, Bernice King, immediately recognized her late father's words.She tweeted, "#MLK quote at the #RoyalWedding. Your life, teachings and words still matter so much, Daddy. Congrats, Harry and Meghan!"Bernice King, 55, also used the opportunity to address a deeper issue: the reservations that some members of the African diaspora -- from both sides of the pond -- may have about the royal family due to Britain's history of colonization and its role in the trans-Atlantic slave trade."Dear Family: It’s okay to watch and be moved by the #RoyalWedding," she wrote Saturday. "It doesn’t make you insensitive or less caring about the inhumanity in the world. It doesn’t mean you’ve forgotten history. Find moments of joy. We need them to continue the work."In his address, Bishop Curry referred to America's history of slavery."There was some old slaves in America's antebellum South who explained the dynamic power of love and why it has the power to transform. They explained it this way -- they sang a spiritual, even in the midst of their captivity," Curry said. "This way of love -- it is the way of life. They got it."And, immediately following Curry's address, a gospel choir performed, displaying the spirit of the black church.Karen Gibson and the Kingdom Choir stood at the west end of Windsor Castle wearing different shades of pale pink to perform a soulful rendition of Ben E. King's 1962 hit, Stand By Me.It was not the first time the Kingdom Choir, who come from southeast England, has performed for British royalty. They were also tapped to perform at the Golden Jubilee of Queen Elizabeth II, celebrating her 50 years on the throne, in 2002.The choir's musical interlude at Harry and Meghan's wedding was followed by a performance by the first black winner of the BBC Young Musician competition, 19-year-old cellist Sheku Kanneh-Mason.Later, the spotlight shone on the honorary chaplain to the queen -- Rose Hudson-Wilkin, a black woman born in Jamaica -- as she addressed the gathering.The lineup seemed to break with royal tradition and embrace Markle's American and African-American heritage.The fact that the former actress, who was born to a white father and black mother, proudly identifies as biracial has been the subject of headlines since the two became engaged last year.In a poignant essay written for Elle magazine, Markle wrote that after struggling with her identity growing up in the San Fernando Valley neighborhood of Los Angeles, she matured into a "strong, confident mixed-race woman."Still, her ascent to the royal family has not protected her from racism.Kensington Palace condemned the discriminatory "racial undertones" in some early coverage of Markle when she began dating the Duke of Sussex in an unprecedented statement issued back in 2016."His girlfriend, Meghan Markle, has been subject to a wave of abuse and harassment," the statement read. "Some of this has been very public -- the smear on the front page of a national newspaper; the racial undertones of comment pieces; and the outrigh
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