• iStock/Thinkstock(TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras) -- All six people aboard a jet that crashed off a Honduras runway and nearly broke in half have survived.Five Americans -- four passengers and a crew member -- and a Venezuelan crew member all were rescued after their Gulfstream apparently overshot the runway in Tegucigalpa, the nation's capital.The four passengers work for EZCORP, the second-largest owner of U.S. pawn shops. Three -- Bob Kasenter, Blair Powell and Nicole Swies -- were treated and released with minor injuries. Joe Rotunda suffered broken ribs and a punctured lung and was transported to a local hospital."The company is coordinating to make sure the employees and crew are receiving proper medical attention," EZCORP said in a statement.The jet had embarked from Austin, Texas, where the company is headquartered.First responders were seen on video helping save those aboard the plane.Honduran President Juan Orlando Hernandez said via Twitter that those injured were in stable condition.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
    Read more...
  • Airbus Defense and Space/38 North(SEOUL) -- North Korea is set to dismantle its nuclear testing facility at Punggye-ri this week in front of a delegation of two dozen handpicked foreign journalists.The journalists flew on a chartered plane Tuesday from Beijing to the city of Wonsan on the east coast of North Korea and were set to be taken on a long journey to the nuclear site near the village of Punggye-ri.From Wonsan, the group is expected to travel at least 11 hours on a train up the coast and another four hours into the foothills of Mount Mantap by bus and then finally an hourlong hike to the nuclear test site, according to reporters there.The research group 38 North said an analysis of satellite imagery taken Monday showed that what was probably an observation platform had nearly been completed at the test site and that improvements had been made to a nearby road and pathway. Another probable observation position had appeared to have been placed on a hillside there, the group said Tuesday.North Korean state media previously reported the dismantlement process will involve “collapsing all of its tunnels with explosions, blocking its entrances, and removing all observation facilities, research buildings and security posts” and that foreign media was invited to cover the event to show the process in a “transparent manner.”Journalists from the U.S., China, U.K. and Russia were among the small group invited to witness the process but The Associated Press reported eight South Korean journalists, who were initially invited, were refused visas after they arrived in Beijing to connect onward to North Korea. The decision coincided with latest protests from Pyongyang over the U.S.-South Korea military drills. No experts were among those invited.South Korea’s President Moon Jae-in’s government expressed regret over the decision to exclude their journalists just as Moon prepared to meet with President Donald Trump in Washington, D.C., Tuesday to discuss Trump’s planned summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un in Singapore. The meeting was scheduled for June 12, but Trump said Tuesday "it may not work out for" that day.Kim announced in April that he no longer needed to conduct nuclear tests because the country had achieved its "nuclear weaponization."Punggye-ri in the northeast of the country has been the site of every one of the six North Korean underground nuclear test from 2006 until the most recent one on Sept. 3, 2017.The facility is built into the granite base of Mount Mantap roughly 100 miles from North Korea’s border with China.
    Read more...
  • iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- As the Trump administration tries to sell its rapidly-evolving trade deal with China to Congress, members of both parties are not convinced it’s in the best interest of the United States.Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin appeared before a Senate subcommittee Tuesday during which he pledged that any changes to penalties on the Chinese telecom ZTE, which is publicly traded but whose largest shareholder is an enterprise owned by the state, would not affect American national security.“I can assure you that whatever the Commerce Department decides, the intel community has been part of the briefings and we will ensure that we enforce national security issues,” Mnuchin said."This was not a quid pro quo or anything else," he added.Last month the United States slapped steep penalties on ZTE for violating U.S. sanctions and doing business with Iran and North Korea. Those infractions, along with concerns that ZTE could use its devices to spy on Americans, led to a seven-year ban on ZTE being allowed to purchase U.S. parts in production, crippling its business. ZTE also agreed to pay a $1.2 billion fine.Now, however, members of the administration have signaled that the terms of ZTE’s punishment are up for negotiation. President Donald Trump tweeted Monday that China had agreed to buy an unspecified amount of American agricultural exports in exchange for the United States easing its sanctions.And in remarks at the White House Tuesday, Trump said he envisioned ZTE having to pay another fine, plus installing a new board and management structure, in exchange for sanctions relief.But he didn't get into many details, saying, "I don't like to talk about deals until they're done. So we'll see what happens."Trump also noted that ZTE buys most of its parts from American companies, meaning those firms get caught in the crossfire and lose business."When you do that, you're really hurting American companies, also. So I'm looking at it," he said.But vague assurances that China will buy more farm products aren't good enough for some lawmakers, especially those from states that depend heavily on agricultural exports. Sen. Ben Sasse, R-Neb., told reporters he had met with farmers and ranchers in his office all morning and that none of them believed this latest development would help them.“They’re scared to death,” Sasse said, adding that he would “love to see the particulars" of the China proposal that Trump mentioned in his tweet.Members of the Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on Financial Services, before which Mnuchin testified Tuesday, tried to ask him more about the specifics of the China arrangement, but he deferred to the Commerce Department, led by Secretary Wilbur Ross, who he said had taken the lead on the talks.But Mnuchin has participated in those discussions, and Sen. Chris Coons, the ranking member on the committee, said he was disappointed Mnuchin didn’t answer questions more directly.“I think Sec. Mnuchin is well aware of decisions being made by the Trump administration with regard to ZTE. He simply passed the buck over to the Secretary of Commerce who wasn't in front of us today,” Coons said.As the administration continues to send mixed signals on the status of the negotiations, lawmakers are wasting no time preparing legislation to potentially check Trump’s authority to lift sanctions on ZTE.The House of Representatives is voting this week on its annual defense authorization bill which contains a provision which would prevent the military from working with contractors that use ZTE devices and networks. The Pentagon has already banned ZTE products from being sold on American military bases.House and Senate committees are also working on bills to prohibit the Trump administration from unilaterally lifting the seven-year ban on ZTE’s ability to purchase U.S. supplies. The Senate measure, introduced by Sen. Chris Van Hollen, D-Md.,
    Read more...
  • Max Mumby/Indigo/Getty Images(LONDON) -- The Duke and Duchess of Sussex attended their first official engagement today as husband and wife, just three days after their wedding.Prince Harry, 33, and Duchess Meghan, 36, still had their newlywed glow while visiting Buckingham Palace for Prince Charles' 70th birthday patronage celebration.Meghan chose a pale-colored dress, purse and hat for the occasion.She was seen warmly laughing with her new in-laws, Prince Charles and Camilla, the Duchess of Cornwall.The garden party is an early birthday celebration for Charles, who will turn 70 in November, and his patronage of hundreds of charities.Harry and Meghan's attendance at the celebration had particular significance because it was Charles who walked Meghan down the aisle Saturday in her father's absence.Charles, who has no daughters of his own, met Meghan at the quire of St. George's Chapel and escorted her to the altar, where Harry stood waiting.Charles, first in line to the British throne, was also seen very publicly welcoming Meghan's mother, Doria Ragland, into the family on Saturday. He appeared to hold his hand out to Ragland at the wedding service and also walked her down the chapel's steps after the service.Even though they got back to work today, Meghan and Harry will take a honeymoon before resuming a busy schedule of engagements for the rest of the year.Neither the timing nor the details of the honeymoon have been released by Kensington Palace.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
    Read more...
  • Getty Images/Dave Hogan for One Love Manchester(NEW YORK) -- Ariana Grande marked the one-year anniversary of the bombing at her Manchester, England concert with a touching message on Twitter."Thinking of you all today and every day," the singer wrote early Tuesday morning. "I love you with all of me and am sending you all of the light and warmth I have to offer on this challenging day.On May 22, 2017, Grande had just left the stage at the Manchester Arena when police say suicide bomber Salman Abedi detonated an explosive device, killing 22 people and injuring more than 100 others.Less than two weeks later, Grande helped organize the all-star "One Love Manchester" benefit concert, raising millions to help victims of the deadly terrorist attack and their families. She was subsequently named an "honorary citizen" of Manchester, which is in northwestern part of England.The "No Tears Left to Cry" singer recently told Time magazine that she is still processing what happened."There are so many people who have suffered such loss and pain," she said, sobbing. "The processing part is going to take forever."Grande, 24, told the magazine she chooses not to focus on the negative."That’s why I did my best to react the way I did," Grande said. "The last thing I would ever want is for my fans to see something like that happen and think it won. Music is supposed to be the safest thing in the world. I think that’s why it’s still so heavy on my heart every single day.""I wish there was more that I could fix," she added. "You think with time it’ll become easier to talk about. Or you’ll make peace with it. But every day I wait for that peace to come and it’s still very painful."Earlier today, Great Britain observed a nationwide moment of silence in honor of the victims of the bombing. A memorial service, attended by Prime Minister Theresa May and Prince William, was also held in Manchester Cathedral.Andy Burnham, the mayor of Greater Manchester, tweeted: "Today we come together, we remember each of the 22 people whose lives were taken."
    Read more...
  • Alex Wong/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- President Donald Trump appeared to raise doubts Tuesday that his upcoming historic summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un will take place as previously planned on June 12."If it doesn't happen, maybe it will happen later. Maybe it will happen at a different time," Trump said in the Oval Office as he sat alongside South Korea President Moon Jae-in. "The meeting is scheduled as you know on June 12th in Singapore. And whether or not it happens, you will be knowing pretty soon.""But it may not work out for June 12," Trump later added. "But there is a good chance that we will have the meeting."Responding to reporters' questions in the meeting, President Trump also appeared to imply again that Chinese President Xi Jinping may have personally pressured Kim to take a stronger stance in negotiations ahead of the summit."I will say I'm a little disappointed because when Kim Jong Un had the meeting with President Xi in China, the second meeting," Trump said. "I think there was a little change in attitude from Kim Jong Un. So I don't like that. I don't like that. I don't like it from the standpoint of China.""Now maybe nothing happened," Trump added. "I'm not blaming anybody. But maybe nothing happened and maybe it did. There was a different attitude by the North Korean folks after that meeting."At the same time, Trump also said coordination on the summit was "moving along" and said that Kim "will be extremely" happy in the event they're able to reach a satisfactory deal to rid the Korean peninsula of nuclear weapons.He said he believed Kim was "very serious" about his previously expressed desire to denuclearize the Korean peninsula."I do think he is serious," Trump said. "I think that he would like to see that happen."But the president again tempered expectations about what the final outcome of any negotiations could be, saying there is "a very substantial" chance that an agreement "won't work out.""You never know about deals. You go into deals that are 100% certain, it doesn't happen," Trump said. "You go into deals that have no chance and it happens. Sometimes happens easily. I've made a lot of deals."President Trump also declined again to say whether he has directly spoken yet with Kim when asked by ABC News."I don't want to say that. I don't want to," Trump said. "There is no reason to discuss that."But he again went out of his way to reassure Kim."I will guarantee his safety. Yes. I will guarantee his safety. And we talked about that from the beginning. He will be safe. He will be happy. His country will be rich."The two leaders are meeting a week after North Korean leaders indicated the June 12 Singapore sit-down between Trump and Kim could be on shaky ground.Several security officials in the country have raised concerns specifically over joint U.S.-South Korea military drills as well as rhetoric from President Trump's national security adviser John Bolton.According to South Korea's Yonhap news, President Moon's national security adviser, Chung Eui-yong told reporters during the flight to Washington "there is a 99.9% chance the North Korea-U.S. Summit will be held as scheduled," but added, "we're just preparing for many different possibilities."Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
    Read more...