• Mustafa Hassona/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images(JERUSALEM) -- Thousands of Palestinians gathered for a second Friday of big protests along the fence dividing Israel and the Gaza Strip. By evening, the Palestinian Health Ministry said at least eight Palestinians had been killed and more than 900 injured by Israeli fire.After midday prayers, the crowds were thinner than last Friday at the same time as thick black smoke from burning tires created a smokescreen between the Israeli snipers and crowds of Palestinians across the fence. The Israeli military estimated some 15,000 protesters were positioned along the fence early afternoon Friday.The Israeli military was lobbing tear gas over the fence and said its snipers had shot at least 10 people "in the legs."It is week two of what Palestinians are calling the "Great March of Return," which started last Friday and is slated to continue through May 15. The end date marks the 70th anniversary of Israel's founding, which Palestinians annually recognize as the day of nakba, or catastrophe, when hundreds of thousands of Palestinians were displaced from their homes.The new U.S. embassy in Jerusalem is also supposed to open this May 15.At least 22 Palestinians have been killed by the Israeli military in the past week, most of them succumbing to wounds from last Friday's protest, according to the Palestinian Health Ministry in Gaza. Nearly 1,500 people -- 1,492 -- were injured in the protests, including 750 from live ammunition used by Israeli soldiers, the ministry said.The Israeli military said the number of bullets used is lower, and that it fired only at what it called the "main instigators" who approached the border fence with the intention of crossing.The International Committee of the Red Cross, along with other international human rights organizations, expressed concern over the high death toll.“The human toll demonstrates the importance for all sides to take all possible precautions to minimize exposure to harm and casualties among the civilian population,” the acting head of the ICRC in Gaza, Fabrice Edouard, said in a statement. “We recognize Israel’s security concerns, yet it is imperative that lethal force only be used as a last resort and when strictly unavoidable in order to protect life."The Israeli military released a statement Friday morning saying, "[Israel Defense Forces] are responding with riot dispersal means, and fire in accordance with the rules of engagement. The IDF will not allow any breach of the security infrastructure and fence, which protects Israeli civilians, and will act against those who are involved in these attacks."The United Nations has meanwhile urged an independent investigation into the use of force, and Secretary General António Guterres called again for restraint on Friday."In light of the tragic events of the 'Great Return March' last Friday, I reiterate my call on all concerned to refrain from any act that could lead to further violence or place civilians in harm's way, especially children," Guterres said. "I call upon all parties on the ground to avoid confrontation and exercise maximum restraint. I particularly urge Israel to exercise extreme caution with the use of force in order to avoid casualties. Civilians must be able to exercise their right to demonstrate peacefully." Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • @AmherstCollege/Twitter(MEXICO CITY) -- The death of an American college student in Mexico has been ruled a homicide, according to Mexican authorities.Andrew Dorogi, 21, a senior at Amherst College, was found dead in Mexico City on March 15, authorities said. His body was found at the Camarones Metro train station on the city's Line 7, according to the Mexico City Attorney General's Office.Shortly before 11 p.m. on March 15, a Secretariat of Public Security officer was called to the tracks of the station to investigate a person in an unauthorized area. That's when the officer noticed a man lying on the tracks, authorities said.After cutting the power, emergency services were called to the station to treat the man. Staff from the Red Cross, however, determined that the person was already dead, authorities said.The body, identified by authorities as Dorogi, was claimed by his mother, according to the Mexico City attorney general's office.The cause of death has been ruled as a "culpable homicide," the office said. It was unclear if any suspects had been identified or if anyone was in custody. Dorogi's family declined to be interviewed.Amherst College President Carolyn Martin released a statement Thursday saying Dorogi "did not die of suicide.""The cause of Andrew's death is still unknown and under investigation," the statement said. "We know from his family that he did not die of suicide."Dorogi was a member of the football team and studied economics, according to the university."Andrew was loved for his friendliness, joyfulness, sense of fun and inclusiveness," the statement said, "and we will create an opportunity on campus to come together in his memory."
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  • Chris Jackson/Getty Images(BATH, U.K.) -- With just weeks to go before their wedding, Prince Harry and Meghan Markle stepped out in Bath, England, Friday, to support a cause very close to Harry's heart. Harry, 33, and Markle, 36, attended the U.K. team trials for the 2018 Invictus Games, to be held in Sydney. Harry, who served in the British Army, founded the Invictus games in 2014 as a Paralympic-style competition for wounded service members.The Sydney Invictus Games, to be held in October, will feature more than 500 competitors from 18 nations in 11 adaptive sports. The 2017 Invictus Games in Toronto were a public coming-out of sorts for Harry and his then-girlfriend, Markle.Markle, who lived in Toronto at the time while filming Suits, made her first official public royal appearance with Harry when she attended the Games' opening ceremony.Later in the Games, the couple arrived to a wheelchair tennis match holding hands.Markle's mom, Doria Ragland, flew from Los Angeles to Toronto to attend the 2017 Invictus Games closing ceremony, where Harry delivered a speech.Harry and Markle's visit to Bath came just days after Markle returned to London from Los Angeles, where she flew to update her mother on the couple's wedding plans.“Meghan left London last Thursday, with a rare break in her calendar, to fly to Los Angeles to spend time with her mother, Doria,” ABC News royal contributor Omid Scobie said in an interview that aired Wednesday on Good Morning America. “It was in Los Angeles that she arrived equipped with sketches from the wedding and of the wedding dress itself so that she could really give her mom some insights into how the big day will look."The trip home for Markle, a California native, came as she and Harry finalize details of their May 19 wedding in St. George’s Chapel at Windsor Castle.Markle's wedding dress designer, whose identity remains a secret, has been making visits to Kensington Palace for fittings with Markle, according to Scobie.Harry and Markle also recently announced their choice of Philippa Craddock, a notable London florist, to design the flowers for the church service and the reception at St. George’s Hall.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(DAMASCUS, Syria) -- Exactly one year ago, on April 6, 2017, between 8:40 and 8:50 p.m. EST, 59 U.S. Tomahawk missiles rained down on a Syrian airbase.The missiles -- launched from U.S. Navy destroyers in the Mediterranean Sea -- were the Trump administration's direct response to a Syrian sarin gas attack the U.S. says was perpetrated by Syria's President Bashar al-Assad days earlier that killed more than 100 Syrian men, women, and children.President Donald Trump said the strike was in the “vital national security interests” of the U.S. -- a massive response meant to send a message to Assad never to use chemical weapons on his own people ever again. Assad has always denied using them. A year later, in its push to retake rebel-held areas in western Syria, the Assad regime has continued to bomb and unleash chemical weapons, the U.S. says, but the Trump administration has not been nearly as vocal in its criticism as it was after the attack on Khan Sheikhoun.Meanwhile, the Assad regime finds itself in a stronger position militarily in western Syria with help from Iranian and Russian forces. On the opposite side of the country, American-backed Kurdish and Arab forces are on the verge of defeating ISIS on the battlefield.But what comes next after an ISIS defeat?Trump has signaled to military leaders that he’d like the U.S. to leave Syria “very soon" -- a move that could open the door to another chapter in Syria's devastating and deadly civil war as it enters its eighth year.ABC News looks at what’s changed -- and what hasn't -- in Syria since April 6, 2017.Chemical attacks continue unabatedIn the year since the chemical weapons attack in Khan Sheikhoun that triggered U.S. military action, the Assad regime has continued to gas its own people, the U.S. and advocacy groups say.Human Rights Watch has estimated the Syrian government to have committed “at least five more chemical weapons attacks” since last April. Many of those were conducted in East Ghouta, a suburb of Damascus, where it was reported the government used chlorine against its people earlier this year, according to the Arms Control Association.Medical facilities supported by Doctors Without Borders said they received over 1,000 dead and 4,800 wounded in East Ghouta between Feb. 18 and March 4 alone.Syrian strikes continued to hit the city during that time period, despite Russia calling for a truce to allow the 400,000 people living there to leave. The Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) said it will examine those attacks to determine if chemical weapons were used. OPCW’s announcement was welcomed by western powers that have hoped to hold the Assad regime accountable.After the attack in Khan Sheikhoun last year, Russia and China vetoed UN Security Council resolutions addressing the incident, including one that would have referred the case to the International Criminal Court.A White House statement earlier this week marking one year since the Khan Sheikhoun attack said the people who died that day “deserve justice” and the administration “will not rest until the regime is held accountable.” But even OPCW’s investigation won’t fully assign blame to the Assad regime for the attacks in East Ghouta -- only confirm the use of chemical weapons.“In Syria, the government is using chemical weapons that are banned the world over without paying any price,” said Lama Fakih, deputy Middle East director at Human Rights Watch. “One year after the horrific sarin attack on Khan Sheikhoun, neither the U.N. Security Council nor the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons has acted to uphold the prohibition against chemical weapon attacks.”Progress in the fight against ISISThe U.S. has had a military presence in Syria since early 2016 to train and advise Kurdish and Arab rebel forces fighting ISIS in northern and eastern parts of the co
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(TOKYO) -- Mount Shinmoedake, featured in the 1967 James Bond film "You Only Live Twice," put on a show Thursday morning when cameras caught not only the volcano erupting but lightning above it. The volcano, which is located between Miyazaki and Kagoshima prefectures in southwest Japan, has been erupting since the beginning of March.On March 15, the Japan Meteorological Agency issued a Level 3 warning, alerting residents to not approach the volcano and refrain from entering the danger zone. According to the Japan Times, the JMA reported ash plumes around 3 miles high from the latest eruption, which occurred at 3:31 a.m. Thursday morning. The agency also confirmed volcanic lightning caused by friction between ash particles.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(BEIJING, China) -- China has formally filed a complaint against planned U.S. tariffs on Chinese goods, the World Trade Organization said today. China "requested consultations" over the Trump administration's plans to impose tariffs, officially initiating a dispute with the WTO, the global trade body said."Consultations give the parties an opportunity to discuss the matter and to find a satisfactory solution without proceeding further with litigation," the WTO said. "After 60 days, if consultations have failed to resolve the dispute, the complainant may request adjudication by a panel."The United States on Tuesday proposed adding a 25 percent tariff to $50 billion of goods imported from China, and China said the next day it would impose its own 25 percent tariff on approximately $50 billion of U.S. exports and that it had initiated a dispute settlement procedure against the U.S. Both countries have listed specific products from the other country that they said they planned to tax.
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