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  • Karwai Tang/WireImage(WINDSOR, England) -- The two designers of Meghan Markle's wedding dresses are finally speaking out after the bride walked down the aisle to wed Prince Harry Saturday inside St. George's Chapel in front of hundreds of relatives and guests.Markle, now known as the Duchess of Sussex, first wore a wedding gown, made out of triple silk organza, featuring an open bateau neckline with three-quarter-length sleeves.Her look, which was seen by millions watching around the world, was completed by her "something borrowed" -- Queen Mary's diamond bandeau tiara, which Queen Elizabeth loaned to Markle, complete with a flower-outlined veil that measured at 16 feet long.Clare Waight Keller, the first female artistic director to head the house of Givenchy, said in comments to the press just what the groom thought of his bride's look."He came straight up to me and he said, 'Oh my god, thank you! She looks absolutely stunning,'" Waight Keller, 47, recalled. "Well, I think everybody saw on television -- he was absolutely in awe, I think. She looked just incredible, and it showed.""So I think, for the both of them, they were just radiant at that time," she added.The British designer called the royal wedding a "dream day" in a post on Instagram.Keller, who accompanied Markle on her wedding day, also shared just what her role entailed."The moment they stepped out as the Duke and Duchess of Sussex," she said, "I was standing just inside making the final adjustments to the beautiful 5-meter veil before they descended the steps to their carriage."For the wedding receptions, Markle stepped out in another wedding gown -- this time designed by British designer Stella McCartney.The Duchess wore a silk crepe, floor-length gown with a high collar, according to Women's Wear Daily, which released sketches of the dress on Sunday. Markle completed her look by wearing "something blue" -- Aquazzura satin shoes with baby blue soles.“I am so proud and honored to have been chosen by the Duchess of Sussex to make her evening gown and represent British design," McCartney, 46, told the magazine. “It has truly been one of the most humbling moments of my career, and I am so proud of all the team on this stunning, sunny royal day.”The designers' comments about their memorable designs came as Kensington Palace released never-before-seen sketches of Markle's first wedding look."The Duchess and Ms. Waight Keller worked closely together on the design, epitomising a timeless minimal elegance referencing the codes of the iconic House of Givenchy," the palace added in a tweet.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • Owen Humphreys/WPA Pool/Getty Images(WINDSOR, England) -- It's safe to say that the royal wedding of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle was the most racially diverse ceremony of the British royal family in recent history.The couple, now the Duke and Duchess of Sussex, exchanged vows Saturday inside St. George's Chapel in England in front of about 600 guests, with another 2,000 outside on the grounds of Windsor Castle and millions more watching on TV around the world.The Most Rev. Michael Bruce Curry, the first black presiding bishop of the American Episcopal Church, spoke, quoting African-American civil rights icon Martin Luther King, Jr."We must discover the power of love, the redemptive power of love. And when we do that, we will make of this old world a new world," the bishop said. "Love is the only way. There's power in love. Don't underestimate it. Don't even over-sentimentalize it. There's power -- power in love."King's daughter, Bernice King, immediately recognized her late father's words.She tweeted, "#MLK quote at the #RoyalWedding. Your life, teachings and words still matter so much, Daddy. Congrats, Harry and Meghan!"Bernice King, 55, also used the opportunity to address a deeper issue: the reservations that some members of the African diaspora -- from both sides of the pond -- may have about the royal family due to Britain's history of colonization and its role in the trans-Atlantic slave trade."Dear Family: It’s okay to watch and be moved by the #RoyalWedding," she wrote Saturday. "It doesn’t make you insensitive or less caring about the inhumanity in the world. It doesn’t mean you’ve forgotten history. Find moments of joy. We need them to continue the work."In his address, Bishop Curry referred to America's history of slavery."There was some old slaves in America's antebellum South who explained the dynamic power of love and why it has the power to transform. They explained it this way -- they sang a spiritual, even in the midst of their captivity," Curry said. "This way of love -- it is the way of life. They got it."And, immediately following Curry's address, a gospel choir performed, displaying the spirit of the black church.Karen Gibson and the Kingdom Choir stood at the west end of Windsor Castle wearing different shades of pale pink to perform a soulful rendition of Ben E. King's 1962 hit, Stand By Me.It was not the first time the Kingdom Choir, who come from southeast England, has performed for British royalty. They were also tapped to perform at the Golden Jubilee of Queen Elizabeth II, celebrating her 50 years on the throne, in 2002.The choir's musical interlude at Harry and Meghan's wedding was followed by a performance by the first black winner of the BBC Young Musician competition, 19-year-old cellist Sheku Kanneh-Mason.Later, the spotlight shone on the honorary chaplain to the queen -- Rose Hudson-Wilkin, a black woman born in Jamaica -- as she addressed the gathering.The lineup seemed to break with royal tradition and embrace Markle's American and African-American heritage.The fact that the former actress, who was born to a white father and black mother, proudly identifies as biracial has been the subject of headlines since the two became engaged last year.In a poignant essay written for Elle magazine, Markle wrote that after struggling with her identity growing up in the San Fernando Valley neighborhood of Los Angeles, she matured into a "strong, confident mixed-race woman."Still, her ascent to the royal family has not protected her from racism.Kensington Palace condemned the discriminatory "racial undertones" in some early coverage of Markle when she began dating the Duke of Sussex in an unprecedented statement issued back in 2016."His girlfriend, Meghan Markle, has been subject to a wave of abuse and harassment," the statement read. "Some of this has been very public -- the smear on the front page of a national newspaper; the racial undertones of comment pieces; and the outrigh
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  • Nick Edwards/WPA Pool/Gety Images(WINDSOR, England) -- Prince Harry and Meghan Markle tied the knot in a spectacular wedding Saturday at St. George's Chapel.The couple recited the Church of England's modernized vows, which omitted the word "obey," during their wedding ceremony."I, Harry, take you, Meghan, to be my wife, to have and to hold from this day forward, for better for worse, for richer for poorer, in sickness and in health, to love and to cherish, till death us do part, according to Gods' holy law, in the presence of God, I make this vow," Harry said.Meghan said: "I, Meghan, take you, Harry, to be my husband to have and to hold from this day forward, for better for worse, for richer for poorer, in sickness and in health, to love and to cherish, till death us do part, according to God's holy law in the presence of God, I make this vow."Harry’s mother, the late Princess Diana, omitted "obey" when she said her vows to Harry’s father, Prince Charles, in 1981.Markle’s new sister-in-law, Duchess Kate, also followed in Diana’s footsteps by omitting "obey" from her vows to Prince William during their 2011 wedding ceremony.Markle became a member of the Church of England after being baptized and confirmed in March by the Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby.Markle wore a white wedding dress designed by Clare Waight Keller, the first female artistic director at French fashion house Givenchy, according to Kensington Palace.Markle's new father-in-law, Prince Charles, walked Markle from the quire, the area of St. George’s Chapel where the clergy and choir sit, to Harry. The procession in the nave, the central part of the church, included the Dean of Windsor and Markle’s bridesmaids and page boys. Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • Owen Humphreys/WPA Pool/Getty Images(WINDSOR, England) -- The Most Rev. Michael Bruce Curry flew across the pond from Chicago to Windsor, England, to deliver an impassioned sermon at Prince Harry and Meghan Markle's wedding on Saturday.Curry, the head of the Episcopal Church, spoke in his royal wedding address about the power of love and, at one point, quoted American civil rights icon Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.Curry's sermon visibly moved guests inside St. George's Chapel at Windsor Castle and also drew notice from some watching around the world, including King's youngest child."Your life, teachings and words still matter so much, Daddy. Congrats, Harry and Meghan!" Bernice King tweeted Saturday. "Bless you, Bishop Michael Curry."Here's the full transcript of Curry's sermon:And now in the name of our loving, liberating and life-giving God, Father, Son and Holy Spirit. Amen.From the song of Solomon in the Bible: 'Set me as a seal upon your heart, as a seal upon your arm. For love is as strong as death. Passion, fierce as the grave. Its flashes are flashes of fire, a raging flame. Many waters cannot quench love. Neither can floods drown it out.'The late Dr. Martin Luther King once said, and I quote: 'We must discover the power of love, the redemptive power of love. And when we do that, we will make of this old world a new world. For love, love is the only way.'There’s power in love. Don't underestimate it. Don't even over-sentimentalize it. There's power, power in love. If you don't believe me, think about a time when you first fell in love. The whole world seemed to center around you and your beloved. Well there's power, power in love. Not just in its romantic forms, but any form, any shape of love. There's a certain sense in which, when you are loved and you know it, when someone cares for you and you know it, when you love and you show it, it actually feels right. There's something right about it, and there's a reason for it. The reason has to do with the source. We were made by a power of love, and our lives were meant and are meant to be lived in that love. That's why we are here. Ultimately, the source of love is God himself. The source of all of our lies.There's an old medieval poem that says: 'Where true love is found, God himself is there.'The New Testament says it this way: 'Beloved, let us love one another because love is of God, and those who love are born of God and know God. Those who do not love do not know God. Why? For God is love.'There’s power in love. There's power in love to help and heal when nothing else can. There's power in love to lift up and liberate when nothing else will. There's power in love to show us the way to live. Set me as a seal on your heart, a seal on your arm, for love is as strong as death.But love is not only about a young couple. Now the power of love is demonstrated by the fact that we're all here. Two young people fell in love and we all showed up. But it's not just for and about a young couple for whom we rejoice with. It's more than that.Jesus of Nazareth on one occasion was asked by a lawyer to sum up the essence of the teachings of Moses. And he went back and reached back into the Hebrew scriptures to Deuteronomy and Leviticus, and Jesus said: 'You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, all your soul, all your mind and all your strength.' This is the first and great commandment, and the second is like it: 'Love your neighbor as yourself.'And then in Matthew's version, he added, he said: 'On these two, love of God and love of neighbor, hang all the law, all the prophets, everything that Moses wrote, everything in the holy prophets, everything in the scriptures, everything that God has been trying to tell the world. Love God, love your neighbors. And while you're at it, love yourself.'Someone once said that Jesus began the most revolutionary movement in all of human history. A movement grounded in the unconditional love of God for the world, and a movement
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  • Anwar Hussein/WireImage(WINDSOR) -- The late Princess Diana was honored and there in spirit at the wedding of her son Harry and his bride, Meghan Markle, in St. George's Chapel on Saturday.Harry handpicked several flowers on Friday from the private garden at Kensington Palace, including forget-me-nots, which were his late mother's favorite flower.The couple specifically chose them to be included in Markle’s bouquet to honor Diana's memory, according to Buckingham Palace.Diana, a humanitarian known to the world as "the People's Princess," died in a car crash in 1997 when she was 36 years old. She left behind a rich legacy of humanitarian and advocacy work and is widely admired for alleviating the stigma surrounding AIDS when photos of her shaking hands with AIDS patients were seen worldwide.The influence of Diana was also felt Saturday at the wedding ceremony when her sister, Lady Jane Fellowes, delivered the reading.Harry has previously said he thinks his late mother would have gotten along well with Markle."Oh, they'd be thick as thieves, without question. I think she would be over the moon," Harry said in an interview with the BBC shortly after the couple announced their engagement.He added that he thinks his mom "would have probably been best friends" with Markle. Markle added, "She's with us."Moreover, the couple paid tribute to Diana with Markle's wedding ring, which includes diamonds from the late princess' jewelry collection. Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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