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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- The Royal Canadian Mounted Police identified the 15 members of the Humboldt Broncos Junior A hockey team who died Friday when a tractor-trailer smashed into the team's charter bus while it was traveling to compete in a playoff game.Ten of the victims were Broncos players.-- Adam Herold, 16, from Montmartre, Saskatchewan-- Connor Lukan, 21, from Slave Lake, Alberta-- Evan Thomas, 18, from Saskatoon, Saskatchewan-- Jacob Leicht, 19, from Humboldt, Saskatchewan-- Jaxon Joseph, 20, from Edmonton, Alberta-- Logan Boulet, 21, from Lethbridge, Alberta-- Logan Hunter, 18, from St. Albert, Alberta-- Logan Schatz, 20, from Allan, Saskatchewan-- Stephen Wack, 21, from St. Albert, Alberta-- Xavier Labelle, 18, from Saskatoon, SaskatchewanThe five remaining fatalities were identified as team personnel members.-- Brody Hinz, 18, from Humboldt, Saskatchewan-- Darcy Haugan, 42, from Humboldt, Saskatchewan-- Glen Doerksen, 59, from Carrot River, Saskatchewan-- Mark Cross, 27, from Strasbourg, Saskatchewan-- Tyler Bieber, 29, from Humboldt, SaskatchewanThe victims were on a charter bus Friday when it collided with a tractor-trailer on Highway 35 about 5 p.m., authorities said. In addition to those who died, 14 other passengers were injured.Since Friday night, dignitaries from around the world have been sending condolences. On Saturday, President Trump tweeted that it was a "tragedy."Queen Elizabeth II and her husband Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, said they were "saddened" by the incident.“Prince Philip and I were saddened to hear word of the crash involving the Humboldt Broncos hockey team," she said in the statement. "Our thoughts and prayers are with those who have lost so much, with their families and with all Canadians who grieve with them at this difficult time.”The comforting missive came after Humboldt Mayor Rob Muench also expressed his heartfelt remorse.The focus has been on the tribute to the dead but also to keep around the clock bedside watch of the 13 surviving players and a trainer who were still in the hospital as of Sunday evening."The biggest thing we can ask for is the support of thoughts and prayers," Kevin Garinger, president of the Humboldt Broncos junior hockey club, said. "We will do everything in our power to support the Humboldt Broncos."As of Sunday evening, the fundraising for the hockey club had risen to more than $4 million. Some of the funding had come from National Hockey League clubs, including the Pittsburgh Penguins, Calgary Flames, Edmonton Oilers, Chicago Blackhawks, Winnipeg Jets and Toronto Maple Leafs, all chipping in hundreds of thousands of donated dollars.The largess humbled the hockey club's president."When we're looking at those numbers, those figures are staggering to us, but we will make sure the funds will be used to respect the families involved in this tragedy," Garinger said.Garinger also said the crash sealed the Broncos' season; the team will put all of its focus on honoring the families and then start preparing for next season.In the parking lot where the team members met to catch the chartered bus, flowers were placed under windshield wipers belonging to the cars still parked in their original spots.Malcolm Eaton, who served as Humboldt's mayor for a decade until last year, considers the Broncos to be family."The Broncos have always been the main feature of the activity that goes on here," he said. "We've gotten to know these kids very well and they become part of your family."Eaton is still processing what happened."It's been a real shock, it's been numbing," he said. "The news came out slowly."Each time there was a new report it was about the seriousness of this accident," Eaton added. "It was all really hard."But he said the community has managed to forge a strong bond and the vigil on Sunday was a testament to that."It brings focus to our thoughts and prayers and hopefully a measure of all of us coming together as a voice of support to the p
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- The Treasury Department Friday sanctioned more than three dozen Russian leaders and businesses as the Trump administration ramps up its pressure on Russia for what it calls its "worldwide malign activity."It's the latest step to punish Russia's President Vladimir Putin by a U.S. president who has talked of warmer relations with Moscow – and critics are split between praising it as a good first step or still not enough.In total, the Treasury Department announced sanctions on seven Russian oligarchs, 12 companies they own or control, 17 senior Russian government officials, and one state-owned company and its subsidiary bank.The list includes key figures in Putin's inner circle and some of his closest associates, including his estranged son-in-law and heads of many of Russia's most important banks and state-owned companies."Russian oligarchs and elites who profit from this corrupt system will no longer be insulated from the consequences of their government’s destabilizing activities," said Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin.The sanctions are in part authorized under the Countering America's Adversaries Through Sanctions Act, or CAATSA – the law that Congress passed overwhelmingly last summer and President Donald Trump begrudgingly signed and that his administration has been slow to implement, missing key deadlines in the past.Many of the names here come from an "oligarchs report" that CAATSA required the administration produce in January — a report officials admitted was in part cribbed from a similar list produced by Forbes magazine, garnering criticism.IS THE TRUMP ADMINISTRATION DOING ENOUGH?CAATSA did not require the administration to sanction any of the oligarchs, but after the alleged poisoning of an ex-spy in the United Kingdom and increased political pressure in the U.S., the administration made Friday's move to show strength against what many have warned is Russia's increasing aggression."The new sanctions announced today will further the administration’s efforts to confront destabilizing and malicious behavior by Russia," the White House said in a statement, pointing to sanctions levied in March for Russia's cyber activity, including the alleged 2016 election interference, penalties in December for alleged human rights abuses, and sanctions last June for Russia's incursion in eastern Ukraine and occupation of Crimea.Those sanctions are in addition to other steps, like the expulsion of 60 Russians – 48 of whom the U.S. alleges are intelligence operatives – from the U.S., the closings of Russia's Seattle and San Francisco consulates, and the sale of lethal weapons to Ukraine.While still bashing Trump's praise for Putin, some critics have begun to applaud the forceful response."This is huge," tweeted Bill Browder, a British-American businessman who has made a life-long campaign out of exposing alleged corruption in Russia after he says his company was targeted by a massive tax fraud and a lawyer working for him, Sergey Magnitsky, was murdered for uncovering it. "Finally hitting Putin and his cronies where it counts," Browder added.Putin's most prominent political opponent, the anti-corruption activist Alexey Navalny, also tweeted his more muted praise, writing "Oh ho, not bad." Navalny specializes in uncovering alleged ill-gotten gains of the elite around Putin and has called for the U.S. and European countries to go after them, saying it is the only way to inflict real pain on the Kremlin and create opposition to Putin within Russia.But others said Friday's actions were not enough to change Russia's behavior."There is a high threshold for economic discomfort in Russia, especially among the ruling class... This idea of we're going to press on one part of the Kremlin's power structure and that will add pressure to Putin is misguided at best," said Brett Bruen, the former Director of Global Engagement in the Obama White House."We have to create better d
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(SALISBURY, England) -- The conditions of an ex-Russian spy and his daughter are improving after the two were poisoned by nerve agent in England last month, according to the hospital treating them.Sergei Skripal, 66, is responding well to treatment, said Salisbury District Hospital Medical Director Dr. Christine Blanshard. His health is "improving rapidly," and he is no longer in critical condition, Blanshard said in a statement.His daughter, Yulia Skripal, is in stable condition."As Yulia herself says, her strength is growing daily and she can look forward to the day when she is well enough to leave the hospital," Blanshard said.It is unclear when Yulia Skripal will be able to leave the hospital.Sergei Skripal and Yulia Skripal were found unconscious on a park bench in Salisbury, about 90 miles southwest of London, last month.In 2006, Moscow's military court convicted Sergei Skripal on charges of spying for Britain and sentenced him to 13 years in a labor camp, according to the BBC. He later took up residence in the United Kingdom.The substance involved in the poisoning -- identified by a laboratory as Novichok, a military grade nerve agent -- is suspected to have been produced by Russia.The U.K. Foreign Office later issued a statement this week saying, "It is our assessment that Russia was behind his brazen and reckless act and, as the international community agrees, there is no other plausible explanation."Russia has denied any involvement in the poisoning.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- The FBI is conducting painstaking DNA tests on a batch of human remains which could be those of American hostages killed in ISIS captivity, after agents and U.S. commandos recently unearthed them from liberated areas in Syria, ABC News has learned.It may be months before testing at the FBI Laboratory in Quantico, Va., determines whether any are those of Americans or other westerners executed by ISIS or killed while held hostage, officials and family members said.The successful recovery of human remains gives hope to American families eager to lay their loved ones to rest at home -- even as they are urging the U.S. government to bring to justice two captured ISIS guards who helped U.S. authorities pinpoint the Syrian grave sites where remains were recovered.Several officials told ABC News that a decision still has not been made on what to do with the pair of Londoners captured by allied Kurdish YPG fighters in January, Alexanda Kotey and El Shafee Elsheikh, who according to the U.S. Department of State were half of the British terror quartet their captives called "the Beatles."Two weeks ago, the parents of murdered American hostages Kayla Mueller, Steven Sotloff, James Foley and Abdul-Rahman (Peter) Kassig were flown to Washington to meet with the FBI, federal prosecutors and top Trump administration officials to express their views on what should be done with the prisoners.While President Trump has said that he wants to send more terrorists to the prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, the family members urged officials at the meeting to try the captured ISIS fighters in federal court.The families reminded officials, according to sources present at the meeting, of an Obama Presidential Policy Directive issued four months after Kayla Mueller's death in 2015 (which has not been rescinded) emphasizing the prosecution of hostage-takers."The United States shall diligently seek to ensure that hostage-takers of U.S. nationals are arrested, prosecuted, and punished through a due process criminal justice system in the United States or abroad for crimes related to the hostage-taking," the directive states.The U.K., which revoked the citizenship of all four "Beatles" including Mohammed Emwazi, the ISIS executioner dubbed "Jihadi John" by the media, has also objected to the men facing anything but a civilian trial, several sources said. Emwazi was killed in a CIA drone strike in Raqqa, Syria, in 2016 and Aine Davis, the fourth alleged “Beatle,” was captured in Turkey."The Brits are not in support of the death penalty and Guantanamo but that was not a threat or demand to not help," one counterterrorism official said.In a joint op-ed published in The New York Times earlier this month, the four families urged Trump not to try them in the military court at Guantanamo and not to seek their execution."Either path would make them martyrs in the eyes of their fanatic, misled comrades in arms — the worst outcome," they wrote. "Instead, they should be tried in our fair and open legal system, or in a court of international justice, and then spend the rest of their lives in prison. That is what our children would have wanted."The U.S. government has rarely ignored the wishes of families of terrorism victims about how perpetrators should be held accountable.Information obtained during Kotey and Elsheikh's interrogations and in material discovered in their possession at the time of their capture helped locate sites in Syria where FBI agents with cadaver dogs started excavating graves under escort by U.S. Special Forces in late February.“Information was obtained leading them to a few of the people,” a counterterrorism official told ABC News at the time.At least four U.S. hostages died in ISIS hands. Journalist James Foley, journalist Steven Sotloff and aid worker Abdul-Rahman (Peter) Kassig were shown being beheaded by “Jihadi John” in ISIS propaganda videos. Aid worker Kayla Mueller wa
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- President Donald Trump said on Tuesday that he is inclined to pull U.S. troops out of Syria soon.“I want to get out. I want to bring our troops back home. I want to start rebuilding our nation,” Trump said in a response to a reporter's question during a press conference with Baltic leaders.The president said the U.S. will be making a decision “very quickly in coordination with others in the area as to what we'll do” and suggested that if others, like Saudi Arabia, want the U.S. to maintain a presence, perhaps they should pay for it.“Saudi Arabia is very interested in our decision and I said, well, you know, you want us to say maybe you will have to pay but a lot of people, you know, we do a lot of things in this country. We do them for, we do them for a lot of reasons. But it is very costly for our country and it helps other countries a hell of a lot more than it helps us. So we're going to be making a decision,” Trump said.The president's remarks come after he suggested last week in surprise comments that the U.S. would soon pull out of Syria.“We will not rest until ISIS is gone," he said before his opening remarks at Tuesday's press conference.
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