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  • iStock/Thinkstock(SALISBURY, England) -- The poisoned daughter of a former Russian spy has reportedly been discharged from the hospital after being targeted with a suspected nerve agent, along with her father.Hospital officials said early on Tuesday morning that Yulia Skripal, 33, had left the facility. They said she had recently made a rapid recovery after spending almost a month unconscious and in critical condition.A statement delivered by the medical director of Salisbury district hospital, Christine Blanshard, said they "wish Yulia well," but added "this is not the end of her treatment.""Yulia has asked for privacy from the media and I want to reiterate that request," Blanshard said.Yulia Skripal and her father Sergei Skripal, 66, were found slumped on a park bench in the English city of Salisbury on March 4. Blanshard said Sergei Skripal has also made "excellent" progress and they hoped he would also be released from the hospital "in due course."Assessments by the British government concluded they were attacked with a type of Russian nerve agent known as Novichok.Russia has fiercely denied allegations that it is responsible for the poisonings and accused the British government of fabricating the attack.Doctors at Salisbury district hospital said last week that Yulia Skripal was "responding well to treatment, improving rapidly and no longer in a critical condition.""Our job in treating the patients has been to stabilize them -- ensuring that the patients could breathe and that blood could continue to circulate," Blanshard said Tuesday morning about the treatments used to save Yulia and her father. "We then needed to use a variety of different drugs to support the patients until they could create more enzymes to replace those affected by the poisoning."Shortly after the hospital's announcement, reports said that Yulia may have spoken to her cousin in Russia by phone.A recording that was purported to be of that conversation was aired on Russian television. During the brief conversation reportedly between the two, Yulia said she did not think her cousin would be given a visa to enter the U.K. to visit her.On Monday, the Russian RIA news agency reported that Yulia is applying for asylum in the U.K.Over the weekend the British press reported the Skripals may be resettled in one of the western countries involved in the "five-eyes" intelligence-sharing community -- the U.S., the U.K., Canada, Australia or New Zealand.
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  • Drew Angerer/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley is urging the Security Council to adopt a resolution that condemns the reported chemical weapons attack in Syria over the weekend and would re-establish a U.N. investigative body to determine whether chemical weapons were used.If the UN didn't act, Haley said, the U.S. would act on its own."Russia's obstructionism will not continue to hold us hostage when we are confronted with an attack like this one. The United States is determined to see the monster who dropped chemical weapons on the Syrian people held to account," she said, repeatedly calling Syrian strongman Bashar al-Assad a "monster."Haley spoke in vivid detail about the attack, but said she wouldn't bother to hold up photos of the children murdered on Saturday, as she has before, because, "What would be the point? The monster who is responsible for these attacks has no conscience, not even to be shocked by pictures of dead children."Neither does Russia, in her view, because "No civilized government would have anything to do with Assad's murderous regime," as Russia – Assad's ally and military backer – does. "Russia could stop this senseless slaughter if it wanted, but it stands with the Assad regime and supports without any hesitation," she added.A draft of the resolution obtained by ABC News "condemns in the strongest terms the continued use of chemical weapons" in Syria – although it does not blame the Assad regime for the attack, instead establishing a U.N. "Independent Mechanism of Investigation" to try to determine whether chemical weapons were used and possibly who is responsible.There was such a body, called the Joint Investigative Mechanism, or JIM, that reported last fall that Syrian strongman Bashar al-Assad's forces were responsible for a sarin gas attack in April 2017 that killed approximately 100 civilians and led to U.S. airstrikes on a Syrian military base. But Russia has since ended the JIM by blocking an extension of its mandate on numerous occasions.The Russian permanent representative to the UN called the latest attack "fake news" during Monday's Security Council session and slammed the U.S., U.K., and France for their "slander, insults, hawkish rhetoric, blackmail, sanctions, and threats to use force against a sovereign state."Ambassador Vasily Nebenzia argued that the attack was staged and said Russian specialists who went to the area took soil samples, "which showed the lack of nerve agent and chlorine-containing substances." They interviewed local residents, he said, and "Not a single local resident confirmed the chemical attack had taken place... There were no reports about symptoms from attacks from substance such as chlorine" at the local hospitals, he said.In fact, he said, no bodies have been found – and without bodies, there could be no crime: "The bodies of the dead as result of the contamination were not found. Medical personnel and residents have no information about their potential burial areas. Thereby, the use of sarin and chlorine is not confirmed," he concluded.The U.S. has disputed those claims, with a State Department official telling ABC News that victims' symptoms, "reported by credible medical professionals and visible in social media photos and video, are consistent with an asphyxiation agent and of a nerve agent of some type."The U.N. body was briefed by the Deputy to the High Representative for Disarmament Affairs Thomas Markram and the Special Envoy of the Secretary-General for Syria Staffan de Mistura ahead of the open hearing. De Mistura, who has been special envoy for nearly four years, offered some of his starkest warnings yet about the increasingly complex conflict in Syria."The Council cannot allow a situation of uncontrollable escalation to develop in Syria on any front," the seasoned Italian diplomat said.Markram, a South African diplomat, also urged the international body to take action: "The Council
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  • Gilles BASSIGNAC/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images(BAGHDAD) -- Monday marked 15 years since Iraqis celebrated the collapse of Saddam Hussein's regime by toppling a statue of the longtime ruler in downtown Baghdad.Some of those who celebrated beheaded the statue and embraced the American troops as liberators.Saddam ruled for 23 years and committed numerous crimes before his ouster, which rendered him a fugitive with a $25 million bounty on his head.In December 2003, the U.S. military confirmed Hussein's capture. At the time, President George W. Bush told Iraqis: "You do not have to fear the rule of Saddam Hussein ever again."Three years later, Hussein and two co-defendants were found guilty of murder and crimes against humanity, linked to the 1982 killings of 148 Shiite Muslims in the Iraqi town of Dujail. They were sentenced to death by hanging.
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  • The Venue Lymm via Storyful(LONDON) -- Security footage from a pub shows a hooded man walking in and dousing more than 20 patrons in white paint.Police said the incident in Lymm, England, just east of Liverpool, occurred the night of April 3 at The Venue, where customers were waiting for the pub quiz to begin, according to Metro."It went all over me and the customers, everyone was covered in it," Emily Clare, 25, owner of The Venue, told Metro. The incident lasted less than a minute. An accomplice of the suspect also splashed red paint across the front of the building. The two men may have fled in a red van.Police are reviewing the footage and investigating the incident, according to Metro.The Cheshire Police Department and the owner of The Venue did not immediately respond to ABC News' request for comment.
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  • ABCNews.com(WASHINGTON) -- President Donald Trump weighed in on the Syrian government's allegedly conducting a new chemical attack against its own citizens. The president in his tweets Sunday morning blasted Russian President Vladimir Putin and the government of Iran for backing the regime of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad in his civil war with rebel forces. Trump also criticized former President Obama, suggesting that he could have taken action to end the Syrian civil war.Trump on Twitter called it a “mindless CHEMICAL attack” and blamed "President Putin, Russia and Iran" for backing the government of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad.A Republican senator responded to Trump's tweets by saying he needs to follow through on his threats to respond to the alleged use of chemical weapons.“If he doesn't follow through and live up to that tweet, he's going to look weak in the eyes of Russia and Iran so this is a defining moment,” Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina told ABC News Chief Global Affairs Correspondent and co-anchor Martha Raddatz on "This Week” Sunday.“Mr. President, you need to follow through with that tweet, show a resolve that [former president Barack} Obama never did to get this right,” Graham said on "This Week."An adviser to Trump who also appeared on "This Week" said he would take nothing "off the table" in predicting the U.S. response to the alleged chemical attack.“I wouldn’t take anything off the table,” White House homeland security and counterterrorism adviser Tom Bossert told Raddatz. “These are horrible photos [from the alleged attack]. We’re looking into the attack at this point.”The Trump adviser said the use of chemical weapons is "one of those issues in which every nation, all peoples have all agreed, and have agreed since World War II, that this is an unacceptable practice."“The president’s senior national security cabinet have been talking with him and with each other all throughout the evening and this morning and myself included" about the alleged chemical attack, Bossert said.ABC News contributor Steve Ganyard said that if Trump does strike Syria in response, it could take days to happen. The U.S. strike against a Syrian air base in 2017 came on April 7, three days after a chemical attack the killed approximately 100 civilians, according to a State Department estimate."That strike was very limited and targeted aircraft in hardened bunkers in remote areas," Ganyard said. "It was a warning more than punishment."A U.S. strike against Syria could potentially send "a message to Damascus that would carry, loud and clear, all the way to Pyongyang," Ganyard said. Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un plan to meet for negotiations over North Korea's nuclear program.
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