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  • Andrew Harrer-Pool/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- In a rare public statement, attorneys for Lt. General Michael Flynn lashed out Friday at news reports that the federal investigation into the former top adviser to President Trump is looking into allegations he helped plot a kidnapping for the Turkish government.“Today's news cycle has brought allegations about General Flynn, ranging from kidnapping to bribery, that are so outrageous and prejudicial that we are making an exception to our usual rule,” Flynn’s top attorney Robert Kelner said in a statement. “They are false.”The statement came after the Wall Street Journal reported federal investigators working for Special Counsel Robert Mueller had interviewed participants in two meetings between Flynn and representatives of Turkey. During those meetings, the report said, Flynn discussed a plot to forcibly remove a Muslim cleric living in the U.S. and deliver him to Turkey in return for as much as $15 million dollars.ABC News reported on those meetings in September, citing allegations by former CIA director James Woolsey, who said he attended a meeting in which Flynn allegedly raised the idea of an operation to capture a Turkish dissident, cleric Fethullah Gulen, who is living in exile in rural Pennsylvania.Turkish officials have accused the cleric of involvement in a failed coup attempt against Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan. Gulen, who has denied involvement, has lived legally in the Pennsylvania’s Pocono Mountains since 1999, and the Turkish government has been financing efforts to persuade the U.S. government to return Gulen to Turkey for years.“It became clear to me that, they were seriously considering a kidnapping operation for Gulen, and I told them then that it was a bad idea, it was illegal,” Woolsey said of the meeting. “I won't say that they had firmly decided to do that. But they were seriously considering it.”Woolsey has been interviewed multiple times by federal agents working on the Mueller team, according to Nancye Miller, his wife and business partner.Flynn’s lawyer said at the time there was no such discussion, calling the allegation categorically “false.” At a press conference in July, the Turkish ambassador to the U.S. also denied the notion of a kidnapping plot.“There's no truth to that,” he said, adding that the government was following “traditional” procedures to have Gulen extradited “through the legal channels.”Friday’s statement was a rare move by Flynn’s lawyers, who, like their client, have remained largely silent in the months since Flynn was removed as Trump’s national security adviser.“Out of respect for the process of the various investigations regarding the 2016 campaign, we have intentionally avoided responding to every rumor or allegation raised in the media,” Kelner’s statement Friday said.There have been repeated reports in recent weeks that Mueller’s team is looking closely at Flynn’s activities during and after the 2016 presidential campaign, where he served as a top adviser to Trump.Of particular interest is Flynn’s visit to Russia, where he was paid to attend a dinner honoring the Russian television network RT – and was seated next to Russian President Vladimir Putin. Investigators have also been looking at his consulting work for a Turkish businessman, which he only belatedly reported in federal disclosure filings.Sen. Ben Cardin, the ranking Democrat on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, told ABC News he found disturbing the mere suggestion that there were discussions about attempting to remove Gulen from the U.S. without a formal extradition process.“I think there’s a lot of information about General Flynn, that we don’t know,” Cardin said. “And I think it’s going to be very interesting as the investigation continues, a
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  • Dominique Davis/AllThatIsShe(DURHAM, England) -- A U.K. mom and her daughters have become Instagram stars for their fashionable -- and coordinated -- outfits.Dominique Davis, 31, and her daughters, Penny, 4, and Amelia, 11, post a photo each Sunday that shows them in matching clothes, often down to their hairstyles.The tradition began last year when Davis, a blogger, dressed herself and Penny in striped shirts and put their hair in messy buns.Davis’s older daughter, Amelia, then walked out of her bedroom in the exact same look.“The next week we thought we’d do another one,” Davis, of Durham, England, told ABC News. “We got 14,000 likes and we thought we’d make it a weekly series.”In the dozens of weeks since, Davis and her daughters have dressed as Mary Poppins, in 1960s-style dresses and with curlers in their hair.“We try and keep them relevant to what we’ve done that week or events we have coming up or trends that we like,” Davis said. “We try to keep it in line with what’s happening with our lives at the moment.”The photos are taken by Davis’ boyfriend, Dominic McCann.Davis said she has noticed her daughters expand their creativity and silliness in the weekly ritual.She also appreciates the time they get to spend together, and the memories they have photographed forever.“It started off as just something fun and something we enjoyed doing every week but I realized as the weeks went on that I had this weekly account of my girls,” Davis said. “It’s like our family photo album but just a bit more creative.”
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  • Pablo Blazquez Dominguez/Getty Images(MADRID) -- A top Catalan independence leader left jail on Friday after posting bond.Supreme Court Judge Pablo Llarena had ruled Thursday that five Catalonian legislators could be freed on bail, including Carme Forcadell, a pro-independence activist and former speaker of the Catalonia Parliament.Forcadell left jail this afternoon after posting the 150,000 euro (U.S. $175,000) bond, according to her lawyer, Andreu Van der Eynde.Forcadell was one of the key figures in the push for independence in Catalunya and read the group's declaration of independence from Spain on Oct. 27 in Barcelona.On Oct. 30, a Spanish judge asked that 20 Catalan politicians be investigated for rebellion, sedition, and misuse of public funds over the push for independence that challenged Spain's central government.Spain is currently going through one of the worst political crises in decades after a referendum in Catalunya Oct. 1 saw millions of people take to the streets to demand the right to vote. According to the Catalunya government, 90 percent of people there voted in favor of independence. Violent clashes between protesters and police injured some 900 people.In his decision to grant the five independence leaders bail, Llarena wrote: "All the accused ... have expressed they would either renounce future political activity or those who will remain active, will do it within the (Spanish) constitutional framework."Two pacifist activists, Jordi Sanchez, the president of the Catalunya National Assembly (ANC) and Jordi Cuixart, the president of Omnium Cultural, are currently being held in prison as part of the same inquiry. Eight former Catalan government members have also been detained since last week. They are not part of the group granted bail by Llarena Thursday.For some pro-independence Catalans who consider these detainees political prisoners, these arrests are an emotional reminder of the days of fascism in Spain.The Catalonia Parliament was dissolved by Madrid after the declaration of independence.Catalans are scheduled to vote in new regional elections on Dec. 21.Meanwhile, Spanish prosecutors are still pushing for the extradition of former Catalan President Carles Puigdemont and five of his former ministers. They fled to Belgium after Spanish prosecutors said they would investigate them for rebellion, which carries a prison sentence of up to 30 years. They are scheduled to appear in court in Brussels on Nov. 17.
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  • ABCNews.com(SEOUL) -- Invoking an alliance with South Korea "forged in the crucible of war," President Donald Trump warned the nuclear-armed North Korean regime "not to underestimate us" and called on all nations to "deny it any form of support, supply, or acceptance.""I hope I speak not only for our countries, but for all civilized nations, when I say to the North: Do not underestimate us, and do not try us," Trump warned Wednesday in a sweeping address before the South Korean National Assembly."All responsible nations must join forces to isolate the brutal regime of North Korea -- to deny it any form of support, supply, or acceptance," Trump said. "The longer we wait, the greater the danger grows, and the fewer the options become.”Standing on the dais, just 35 miles from the North Korean border, the president also spoke directly to Kim Jong Un, who he addressed by name."The weapons you are acquiring are not making you safer. They are putting your regime in grave danger," Trump said. "North Korea is not the paradise your grandfather envisioned. It is a hell that no person deserves."Trump, who in recent days has expressed openness to a "deal" with North Korea, said he remains open to a negotiation but only if "complete and verifiable denuclearization" is on the table.“We will not be intimidated," Trump said. "And we will not let the worst atrocities in history be repeated here on the ground we fought and died so hard to secure."He added, "If you want peace, you must stand strong at all times."President Trump painted a picture of horrific living conditions under dictator Kim Jong Un -– a "twisted regime" he called a "cult" -– describing personal stories of torture and abuse and harrowing attempts to escape.He accused China and Russia, two financial benefactors of North Korea, for being complicit in the regime's abuses."To those nations that choose to ignore this threat or, worse still, to enable it," Trump said, "the weight of this crisis is on your conscience." He urged all countries to sever formal diplomatic recognition of North Korea and end trade and technological ties.Administration officials have been optimistic that the president's approach –- starkly different than his predecessors’ at least rhetorically -– may force the Kim regime to improve its behavior and avoid the disastrous last resort of military conflict.On Monday in South Korea, Trump suggested he could "make a deal" with the regime, urging North Korea to "come to the table," but would not say whether he still believes direct talks are a waste of time.In addition, there is big political pressure to relist North Korea as a state sponsor of terror and national security adviser H.R. McMaster told reporters last week the administration is considering it."That's an option that's under consideration. The president's Cabinet is looking at this as part of the overall strategy on North Korea," he said.A senior administration official told ABC News that conversations are "ongoing" and "fluid" as to when to make the announcement, adding "it's a matter of when rather than if."During his inaugural trip to China, Trump will directly confront President Xi Jingping over North Korea, seeking concrete commitments the country will do more to crack down."In the end, we will work things out far better than anyone understands or can appreciate," Trump said in his speech.
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  • ABCNews.com(SEOUL) -- President Donald Trump attempted to make a surprise visit to the Demilitarized Zone -- the heavily fortified border between North and South Korea -- but was forced to turn back due to bad weather.Thick gray fog blanketing Seoul hampered the president's flight on Marine One, which officials said flew from the Yongsan Garrison military post toward the DMZ but was forced to turn back just five minutes from the landing zone.The Secret Service and U.S. military made the decision to abort the trip for safety, an administration official said.The visit was shrouded in secrecy to protect the president's safety. "This is where we're going," White House press secretary Sarah Sanders quietly told a small group of reporters invited to join the mission. She held up a piece of notepaper on which the letters "DMZ" were scrawled. The group was told they could not report the visit publicly until it was over.Trump was joined by South Korean President Moon Jae-in and Gen. Vincent Brooks, the top U.S. military commander in South Korea.A joint visit to the DMZ by an American and South Korean president would have been a "historic moment" that has never happened before, the White House said.The White House previously said that Trump would not be going to the DMZ, citing time constraints and calling any potential visit a “cliché.” Vice President Mike Pence, Secretary of Defense James Mattis and Secretary of State Rex Tillerson have all recently visited the DMZ.Trump was disappointed and pretty frustrated by not being able to complete the secret trip, Sanders told reporters.The news of the president's attempted visit comes amid his heightened war of words with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and as Trump prepares to call on the international community to maximize pressure on North Korea.Trump previously declined to say whether he would travel to the DMZ during his Asia tour, telling reporters, “You’ll be surprised.”Earlier on the trip, Trump said he sees progress in the steps his administration has taken with regard to North Korea, suggesting he could "make a deal" with the regime, but would not say whether he still believes direct talks are a waste of time.
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