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  • Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- President Donald Trump ignited a new war of the words Tuesday with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un over the size of his purported "nuclear button."Trump tweeted, "North Korean Leader Kim Jong Un just stated that the 'Nuclear Button is on his desk at all times.' Will someone from his depleted and food starved regime please inform him that I too have a Nuclear Button, but it is a much bigger & more powerful one than his, and my Button works!"The president's tweet came after the rogue leader said in a New Year's address, "the button for nuclear weapons is on my table," and that he could use it to launch an attack on the entire United States.
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  • Steve Russell/Toronto Star via Getty Images(TORONTO) -- Former Taliban hostage Joshua Boyle was charged Monday in Canada with 15 criminal offenses including multiple allegations of assault since he arrived home with his American wife and three children in October following five years of captivity in Pakistan.Boyle, 34, appeared in a hearing in Ottawa's criminal court on New Year's Day, court records show. He was denied immediate release and his next hearing will be Wednesday, according to a family member.Boyle’s American wife, Caitlan Coleman Boyle, said in a statement, "I can’t speak about the specific charges, but I can say that ultimately it is the strain and trauma he was forced to endure for so many years and the effects that that had on his mental state that is most culpable for this.“Obviously, he is responsible for his own actions,” she wrote in the statement, “but it is with compassion and forgiveness that I say I hope help and healing can be found for him. As to the rest of us, myself and the children, we are healthy and holding up as well as we can.”The 15 charges filed Monday by the Ottawa Police Service include multiple allegations of assault, including physical and sexual assault of a woman, physical assault of a child and unlawful confinement, between October and December and misleading police over the weekend "to divert suspicion from himself."The Canadian court issued an order prohibiting the publication of information that identifies the alleged victims in Canada. As a general policy, ABC News does not name victims in cases of alleged sexual assault.Joshua Boyle's defense lawyer, Eric Granger, in a statement to ABC News said his client "is presumed innocent.""He's never been in trouble before. No evidence has been provided yet, which is typical at this early stage. We look forward to receiving the evidence and defending him against these charges," Granger added.The longtime Canadian anti-war activist raised in Perth-Andover and his wife of Stewartstown, Pennsylvania, disappeared hiking through eastern Afghanistan in 2012 and were held by the Taliban's Haqqani Network for five years until their sudden release in October, just as American commandos were staging a rescue operation. The circumstances of their release remain unclear.Caitlan Coleman Boyle, who was six months pregnant at the time of their capture more than five years ago, would give birth to three children in captivity. In an interview with ABC News in November, she said she and her family endured brutal treatment at the hands of their captors, including what the couple alleged was a "forced abortion" and rape by their Haqqani guards.The newly freed family arrived in Toronto on Oct. 13. The initially stayed with Joshua Boyle's parents in Smiths Falls, Ontario, but they soon moved into a hotel in Ottawa. Recently the Boyles moved into a rented apartment and told ABC News they were eager to make it a home.Joshua Boyle was known in Canada for his activism even before becoming a hostage of the Haqqani Network. He was previously married to one of Canada's most outspoken pro-jihadi women, Zaynab Khadr, whose two brothers were imprisoned at the Guantanamo Bay detention camp, but were later released.U.S. intelligence officials long expressed doubts to ABC News about Joshua Boyle's motives in traveling to Afghanistan in 2012. Joshua Boyle told ABC News last month that those doubts were unfounded and referred to his Haqqani captors as "criminal miscreants."American officials put aside their skepticism of Joshua Boyle in offering the family assistance in leaving Pakistan and since they settled in Ottawa, including offers of psychological counseling to adjust from captivity, they have told ABC News.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(LIMA, Peru) -- Officers in Peru are racing to rescue victims after a bus fell over the edge of the Pan-American Highway, just north of Lima, the capital, the National Police of Peru said on Twitter.
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  • ABCNews.com(MOSCOW) -- Russia's military, trying to show a fluffier side, has released a New Year's video of adorable puppies serving in the country's armed forces.The video, posted on Russia's ministry of defense's YouTube channel, shows dogs and puppies playing in the snow at an elite military training center outside Moscow.The channel has more commonly been used to show off Russia's military might in Syria, posting videos of bombardments by Russian aircraft there, as well as military maneuvers elsewhere. The video was released as Russian President Vladimir Putin has vowed to continue backing Syria's forces.The New Year's video, however, shows mussed puppies, as well as older dogs, frolicking in the snow and being fed.Like other militaries around the world, dogs in Russia are used as guards and for detecting explosives. Photos on the breeding center's Facebook page show Russian soldiers in Syrian campaign uniforms. Russian sappers have been de-mining areas re-taken by the Syrian army and training its troops.The video, titled "Loyal Friends," ends with New Year's wishes. New Year's Day is one of Russia's most important holidays, with families celebrating it much like Christmas in the U.S. and Europe.
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  • ABCNews.com(WASHINGTON) -- An American service member was killed in combat in eastern Afghanistan on Monday and four others were wounded in an area known for ISIS activity."Two wounded service members are being treated at a nearby medical treatment facility and are in stable condition," according to a statement released Tuesday by U.S. Forces Afghanistan. "The other service members have returned to duty.""We are deeply saddened by the loss of one of our own,” said General John Nicholson, commander, U.S. Forces-Afghanistan. "At this very difficult time our heartfelt sympathies go out to the families and friends of our fallen and wounded brothers."The area around Achin, Afghanistan, has been a key battleground against the ISIS affiliate that operates in eastern Afghanistan. ISIS forces peaked at about 3,000 in 2016, but heavy fighting since then has dwindled their numbers to about 1,000.Fifteen American service members died in Afghanistan in 2017. Almost half of that number resulted from anti-ISIS operations in eastern Afghanistan.There are roughly 14,000 American troops in Afghanistan advising and assisting the Afghan military in the fight against the Taliban and ISIS.New combat rules established by President Trump have allowed American troops to accompany Afghan forces at the battalion level, possibly placing them closer to combat situations.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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