• Wavebreak Media/Thinkstock(MANCHESTER, England) — The brother of Salman Abedi, the suspect accused of carrying out a bombing in Manchester, England, that killed 22 people, allegedly said he knew his brother was going to carry out an attack, but did not know where or when, according to a spokesman for Libya’s counterterror forces.Abedi, 22, the suspected suicide bomber, died at the scene of Monday night's attack at an Ariana Grande concert.Authorities found what was described to ABC News as a bomb-making workshop in Abedi’s home in Manchester, with enough chemicals to build additional bombs.  Libyan authorities had been following Hashem Abedi, the suspect’s brother who was born 1997, for a month and a half because of suspected links to ISIS, said Ahmed Dagdoug, the spokesman for Libya’s counterterror forces.The two brothers were close, and Dagdoug said that Salman placed a call to Hashem, as well as their mother, 30 minutes before carrying out the attack.On Tuesday, that brother was detained in Libya. During interrogation, Hashem Abedi revealed that he knew his brother was going to carry out an attack, but he did not know where or when, Dagdoug said.Dagdoug said Hashem Abedi also revealed that he knew exactly how the bomb was made, and that he believes that Salman created the device by himself. He said that he provided some assistance to his brother, but added no specific details as to what that was.Dagdoug said a network was involved in planning the attack.The brothers came to Libya on April 18 and Salman Abedi departed on May 17, Dagdoug said.It’s not clear at this time if Salman went to Syria, Dagdoug said.Salman Abedi's father, Ramadan Abedi, was also arrested in Libya.Dagdoug told ABC News that the two brothers do consider themselves to be members of ISIS and said that they had been studying ISIS videos online, including instructional videos that teach the viewer how to make a bomb.  Another one of the suspect's brothers, 23-year-old Ismail Abedi, was arrested in Manchester, a security official confirmed to ABC News.A total of seven people are in custody in Britain in connection with the attack. Under British law, a person can be taken into custody in a terrorism investigation and held up to 14 days without being charged.Chief Constable Ian Hopkins of the Greater Manchester Police said today, "This is clearly a network that we are investigating, and extensive activity is taking place across Greater Manchester as we speak." U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May Tuesday raised the country's threat level to critical -- the highest of the United Kingdom's five threat levels -- indicating that another attack may be imminent.  The U.K. Metropolitan Police said 1,000 additional armed officers have been freed up to carry out patrols across the U.K."The extra officers add to a wider policing plan which sees increased patrolling at crowded places, iconic sites and transport hubs as police and partners do everything they can to protect the public," the police said.  Twenty-two people, including a female police officer who was off duty, were killed in the Monday night explosion. ISIS has claimed responsibility for the bombing.Witness Joseph Harries told ABC News' "Good Morning America" that "people were just trying to get out of the arena as fast as they possibly could after the blast. I was directly in front of the stage at the heart of the arena. I had exactly the same distance to get out of any of the doors."  "I had my best friend with me, and I grabbed hold of her wrist and told her never let go of me," he said. "We just ran. We jumped over chairs, railings to get out of the doors. We had to force open doors that wouldn't open because people were trying to get to -- the entire capacity of the 20,000-person arena were trying to get out of one exit."It felt like an eternity," Harries added, but it "couldn't have been more than two, three minutes from in our seats to outside of
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  • ABC News(MANCHESTER, England) -- In the wake of a devastating bombing in Manchester that killed at least 22 people at an Ariana Grande concert, officials and parents alike were grappling with the news that many of the injured and killed were young adolescents or children.U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May called the bombing a "sickening attack" that targeted children and young people "who should have been enjoying one of the most memorable nights of their lives.""We struggle to comprehend the warped and twisted mind that sees a room packed with young children not as a scene to cherished but as an opportunity for carnage," May said Tuesday.According to the Greater Manchester Health and Social Care, a total of 119 people were taken by ambulance or went to a hospital following Monday night's attack at Manchester Arena. Officials said 64 were being treated as of Wednesday and 20 of them remained in critical condition across Greater Manchester.At least 12 children under the age of 16 were seriously injured, officials said. An 8-year-old girl who died from her injuries is the youngest known victim in the attack. Saffie Rose RoussosAmong the dead is Saffie Rose Roussos, described by her teacher as a "beautiful little girl."Saffie had become separated from her mother and sister during the attack.Chris Upton, the headteacher at the Tarleton Community Primary School, where Saffie was a student, released a statement calling the girl's death a "tremendous shock.""I would like to send our deepest condolences to all of her family and friends," Upton said. "The thought that anyone could go out to a concert and not come home is heartbreaking. Saffie was simply a beautiful little girl in every aspect of the word. She was loved by everyone and her warmth and kindness will be remembered fondly. Saffie was quiet and unassuming with a creative flair."Upton said the school will be calling in specialists to help students and staff cope with Saffie's death.Georgina CallanderRunshaw College confirmed that the 18-year-old college student was among the victims. "It is with enormous sadness that it appears that one of the people who lost their lives in Monday’s Manchester attack was one of our students here at Runshaw College," school officials said in a statement posted on Facebook. "Georgina Callander was a former Bishop Rawstorne pupil studying with us on the second year of her Health and Social Care course. Our deepest sympathies, thoughts and prayers go out to all of Georgina’s friends, family, and all of those affected by this loss." Olivia Campbell"RIP my darling precious gorgeous girl Olivia Campbell taken far far to soon go sing with the angels and keep smiling mummy loves you so much," Olivia's mother, Charlotte Campbell, wrote on Facebook.  Prior to learning that her 15-year-old daughter had been killed in the attack, the teen's mother pleaded for the public to help her locate her daughter, telling the BBC, "I’m worried sick. If anybody has seen her please contact the police. Contact somebody let her know you’ve seen her. Even if you think you’ve seen her just let the police know ... We’ve not slept. We’ve got family out looking for her. Please, please somebody must have seen her at some point. Just let me know you’ve seen her. Let the police know, let anybody know you’ve seen her please."Lisa LeesThe 43-year-old mother and grandmother was also among those killed. One of her daughters, Lauren Ashleigh Lees, described her as "a very elegant person" and "an amazing" mother, grandmother and wife who was "absolutely adored" by everyone around her."She cared so much for everybody and did anything for them," Lauren Ashleigh Lees said in a statement. "We will pull together as a family and help each other through the darkness."Nell JonesThe ninth-grader was confirmed to have died in the attacks by her school, Holmes Chapel Comprehensive and Sixth Form. The girl's family had searched for her after
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  • Franco Origlia/Getty Images(ROME) -- First lady Melania Trump paid a visit to Bambino Gesù children's hospital in Rome on Wednesday, spending her time coloring with patients, snapping selfies, signing bandages and even speaking to them in Italian.“My visit to Bambino Gesu Children’s Hospital today was very moving," the first lady said in a statement. "To spend time speaking to and coloring with children who have such a positive spirit despite illness was an amazing gift. The time I spent with the little ones in the Intensive Care Unit is something I will never forget, and I will pray for each of them daily. I want to thank the doctors, nurses and staff of the hospital, who all do such beautiful and critical work.”Trump also shared a moving story about a young boy who was just informed he received a heart transplant, adding that she visited with the boy just hours prior.“Upon landing in Belgium, I learned a young boy and his family who had been waiting for a heart transplant was informed that the hospital has found a donor," she said. "I read a book and held hands with this special little one just a few hours ago, and now my own heart is filled with joy over this news.” A little boy who I visited today & had been waiting for a heart transplant will be receiving one! #Blessings #Faith pic.twitter.com/DZU3ojxXVC
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(CAIRO) -- The U.S. Embassy in Cairo issued a security warning about a potential threat posed by a group it referred to as a "terrorist organization.""The embassy is aware of a potential threat posted on a website by the Hassm group, a known terrorist organization, suggesting some kind of unspecified action this evening," the embassy said in a security message. "The embassy has no further information about this potential threat but is in contact with Egyptian authorities."Hassm is described as "a non-Salafi revolutionary jihadist group" that uses "violent insurgency tactics against Egyptian security forces, which they refer to as occupiers," according to the Terrorism Research & Analysis Consortium, a digital database of research and analysis focused on terrorism.Hasam is a splinter group of the Muslim Brotherhood, a Sunni Islamist organization and political party, according to TRAC.The message urges Americans living in Egypt to follow security guidelines provided by the State Department for dealing with possible threats."U.S. citizens should continue to follow sound security practices and adhere to the security guidelines provided in the travel warning for Egypt issued by the State Department on Dec. 23, 2016," according to the message.Additional information will be provided if it becomes available, the message said. Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • ABC News(NEW YORK) -- Authorities tell ABC News that they found a kind of bomb-making workshop in Salman Abedi’s home and he had apparently stockpiled enough chemicals to make additional bombs.The hunt is intensifying for what British authorities suspect is a possible “network” behind the deadly suicide blast outside an Ariana Grande concert at Manchester Arena on Monday, officials say.The search stretched from the U.K. to Libya, where officials made multiple arrests in a country seen by American officials as a burgeoning new base of operations for ISIS, which has claimed Salman Abedi was a "soldier of the Caliphate."Counterterrorism officials fear whoever built the bomb that killed 22 people and injured more than 50 others may have built other improvised-explosive devices which could be used in further attacks.“I think it’s very clear that this is a network that we are investigating,” Ian Hopkins, chief constable of the Greater Manchester Police, said in a press briefing.According to a terrorism expert who has been briefed on the investigation, the bomb featured a sophisticated design similar to the bombs used in the attacks in Brussels in 2016.The expert confirmed that Abedi traveled to Manchester Arena by train, likely carrying the bomb in a backpack. The device, a metal container stuffed with bolts and nails, was apparently hooked to a powerful battery and featured a remote, cell-phone detonator with built-in redundancies to ensure a blast even if a first attempt failed.The design was sophisticated enough to bolster the theory that Abedi didn’t act alone, suggesting, according to the expert, “there’s a bomb maker on the loose.”"It's really suggesting that he probably did not act alone, that he probably had some help, that he certainly had some advice on how to create the bomb," said Matt Olsen, former director of the U.S. National Counterterrorism Center and an ABC News contributor. A western counterterrorism official told ABC News hours after the attack that British-born Abedi had only days earlier returned from an extended trip to his ancestral Libya, which has seen large towns under ISIS control in the past two years.Libyan authorities Wednesday arrested both the bomber’s father, Ramadan, and the bomber's younger brother Hashim. Ramadan told Reuters that Salman was not a member of any terror group, but a spokesperson for Libyan special forces told ABC News that, following his arrest, Hashim admitted his involvement in the plot and told authorities that he and Salman consider themselves members of ISIS.Hashim knew his brother was planning a suicide attack, the spokesperson said, but he didn’t know the time or place or target. According to the spokesperson, Hashim said he and Salman had been studying ISIS videos online since 2015, including videos offering instruction on how to make a bomb.British officials expressed anger at American security officials over the leak to U.S. news media of Abedi's name hours after the attack, when they already realized he might have accomplices they needed to locate as fast as possible to prevent more lives being lost in a followup attack, one senior western official told ABC News.Past plots to successfully attack Paris and Brussels were hatched by core-ISIS in its Syria stronghold Raqqa, but counterterrorism investigators believe Abedi dropped out of university in Manchester this year and visited Tripoli "to get some skills" from the terror group's operatives there. If true, it would be the first core-ISIS plot hatched from outside Syria and possibly signals a significant shift.The U.S. military's Joint Special Operations Command has gradually increased its operations in Libya, killing the top ISIS leader last year in an airstrike and other senior leaders there.The U.K. has raised its threat level and deployed troops including elite anti-terrorism commandos of the Special Air Service.Copyright © 2017, ABC Ra
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  • Vatican Pool/Getty Images(ROME) — President Donald Trump and Pope Francis exchanged gifts Wednesday following their cordial, private meeting at the Vatican that lasted about 30 minutes.In standard practice, the pope gave rosaries to the president's visiting U.S. delegation, including first lady Melania Trump and the president's son-in-law and daughter, White House advisers Jared Kushner and Ivanka Trump.The pope gave the president a large medal by a Roman artist, inscribed with an olive branch — a symbol of peace.Pope Francis also gave Trump this year's "message of peace" with a personalized inscription he had written."We can use peace," Trump said. "That's so beautiful. Thank you."Other gifts from the pope include his three writings on the topics of family, the joy of the gospel and "care of our common home, the environment," which the pope said he gives to all Catholics.Included in these three writings is Pope Francis' 2015 encyclical "Laudato Si," in which he calls for global action to combat climate change."Well I'll be reading them," Trump said after receiving the gifts.In return, President Trump gave Pope Francis a set of books by civil rights icon Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. presented in a custom, hand-made display case."I think you will enjoy them," Trump told the pope.The first-edition collection includes Stride Toward Freedom, The Measure of a Man, Why We Can’t Wait, Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community? and The Strength to Love, which has Dr. King's signature.According to the White House, each book is "custom-bound and accented with gold hand-tooling."In addition to the books, Trump gave the pope a piece of the Dr. King monument, the Stone of Hope, engraved with a quote, and a hand-made bronze sculpture of a floating lotus by a Florida artist titled "Rising Above." The sculpture represents "hope for a peaceful tomorrow" the White House said.Before parting ways, President Trump thanked the pontiff and said, "I won't forget what you said."Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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