• Justin Sullivan/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julian Castro is being vetted as a potential running mate for presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton, according to a Democratic source familiar with the process.Castro, 41, would be the first Hispanic candidate on a presidential ticket. His selection could help Clinton energize Hispanic voters and sharpen her contrast with presumptive Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump, who has courted controversy with his anti-immigrant proposals and incendiary rhetoric.Castro delivered the keynote address at the 2012 Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, the same prime-time role played in 2004 by Barack Obama, then an Illinois state senator.As mayor of San Antonio, Castro led a successful effort to expand prekindergarten in the city. He was tapped by President Obama in 2014 to lead the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.“At every challenge that has faced Julian Castro, he has knocked it out of the park,” said Christian Archer, a Texas-based Democratic strategist who worked with Castro in San Antonio.Castro -- whose twin brother, Democratic Rep. Joaquin Castro, represents San Antonio in Congress -- lacks the experience of more seasoned potential running mates such as Tim Kaine, a current U.S. senator and former governor of Virginia, and Rep. Xavier Becerra of California, a top House Democrat.And unlike Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts and U.S. Labor Secretary Tom Perez, Castro is not favored by progressives, who criticized him over federal mortgage policy this spring.But his supporters say the telegenic housing secretary could help broaden Clinton’s appeal.“He’s Gen- X, she’s a baby boomer. He brings gender balance, he brings regional balance,” said Henry Cisneros, a former HUD Secretary under President Bill Clinton and former San Antonio mayor.As the Clinton campaign reviews his professional and personal records, Castro has continued to play coy.At the Texas Democratic Convention last month, he told reporters he was not being vetted and downplayed the likelihood of his nomination.Castro endorsed Clinton last October and campaigned with her around the country through the primary season."I am going to really look hard at him for anything because that’s how good he is,” Clinton said of Castro at a round-table in Texas shortly after his endorsement of her.The Clinton campaign did not respond to a request for comment.
    Read more...
  • ABC News(NEW YORK) — Donald Trump used Twitter to stoke speculation about his vice presidential selection process Monday.He published a string of tweets praising three people who are believed to be in contention to become the presumptive GOP nominee's running mate.The first mention was of Arkansas Sen. Tom Cotton, a vocal Trump supporter:
    Read more...
  • ABC News(NEW YORK) — The holiday weekend included a meeting with the FBI and a trip to a Broadway show for presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton.The former Secretary of State met with the FBI on Saturday morning and "gave a voluntary interview" that was "about her email arrangements," according to a statement from her spokesman Nick Merrill.An aide to Clinton said the interview lasted about three and a half hours at the FBI headquarters in Washington D.C.Clinton called into Meet the Press a few hours later and said that the interview was civil and business-like."It was something I had offered to do since last August. I have been eager to do it," she told Meet the Press. "I was pleased to have the opportunity to assist the department in bringing its review to a conclusion."Republican National Committee chairman Reince Priebus released a statement slamming "her reckless conduct" and pointing to the interview as "the first major party presidential candidate to be interviewed by the FBI as part of a criminal investigation."The controversial interview didn't keep the Clintons indoors, however. Later Saturday, they were seen in New York attending Hamilton, arguably the hottest show on Broadway. Tickets to the show have always been hard to come by, but are especially difficult to get now as the show's star and creator Lin Manuel Miranda is stepping down next week.Some attendees -- including New York state Senator Adriano Espaillat who was seated with the Clintons -- shared pictures of the first couple at the play.Saturday wasn't their first time seeing the Tony-winning play, as they were also able to catch it when it was showing at the Public Theater before it moved to Broadway.Clinton will host a special performance of the show next week as a fundraiser for her campaign.Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
    Read more...
  • Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images(KETCHUM, Okla.) — A plane piloted by Sen. Jim Inhofe (R-Oklahoma) ran off the runway Sunday night in Ketchum, Oklahoma.According to a spokesperson for the senator, he was out flying with another local pilot, each in separate planes, when severe weather forced him to make an unscheduled landing in Ketchum.An FAA statement says the pilot reported veering into some brush to avoid a deer on the runway. The FAA would not say who was flying the plane, but the senator's spokesperson confirmed to ABC News that he was at the controls.There were no passengers in the senator's plane.Inhofe was uninjured, and is now home with family celebrating the July 4th holiday, his spokesperson said.The aircraft was a Harmon Rocket, tail number N73MM, according to the FAA, which is investigating the incident.Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
    Read more...
  • ABC News(NEW YORK) --  Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-OH) said Sunday that he thinks it's unlikely that former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton will be indicted over her use of a private email server to conduct official business."I'm not worried about it," Brown said. “I think that there won’t be an indictment, and I think that means she did what many secretaries of state have done in the past,” he added, referring to Clinton's use of a nongovernment email address, although she is the only secretary of state to have built and used a personal email server functioning out of her home.In defending Clinton, Brown mainly sought to go on offense against Clinton’s presumptive general election opponent Donald Trump.“I think what this story is missing is all we don’t know about Donald Trump,” Brown told ABC’s Martha Raddatz on This Week. He went on to refer to what he said was Clinton’s strong record of public disclosure on things like her tax returns and health care records and compared that to Trump’s.“That’s a contrast we need to make,” he said.  Brown did, however, call it “unfortunate” that Clinton’s husband Bill last week met on an airport tarmac with U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch, who will ultimately be required to act upon the recommendations of the FBI once it concludes its investigation into Clinton’s email practices.“I wish it hadn’t happened,” Brown said of the meeting.The Ohio senator also threaded a needle between Clinton’s advocating for the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal while serving in the Obama administration and her opposition to the trade pact now, saying part of her job was to publicly promote the president’s policies.“When she was secretary of state, her boss was advocating a trade policy," he said. "It was her boss.”Brown refused to say whether he’s been contacted by the Clinton campaign about being vetted as a possible vice presidential candidate.“I’m simply not going to speculate on that. I love the job that I get to do,” he said.When pressed by Raddatz, he continued, “You’ve heard my answer, that’s what you’re going to get.”Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
    Read more...
  • ABC News(WASHINGTON) -- Hillary Clinton gave a "voluntary interview" to the FBI Saturday regarding her email arrangements while she was secretary of state, her campaign says."Secretary Clinton gave a voluntary interview this morning about her email arrangements while she was Secretary," spokesman Nick Merrill said. "She is pleased to have had the opportunity to assist the Department of Justice in bringing this review to a conclusion. Out of respect for the investigative process, she will not comment further on her interview."The interview occurred at FBI headquarters in Washington, D.C., and lasted approximately three and a half hours, according to a Clinton aide."I was happy I got the opportunity to assist the department and bring this to a conclusion," Clinton said in an interview scheduled to air Sunday on NBC's "Meet the Press."The presumptive Democratic presidential nominee said she still stands by "my answers that I first gave more than a year ago."The Justice Department declined to comment, and the FBI did not immediately respond to a request for comment.The FBI is in the final stages of its email-related investigation, looking at how Clinton and her aides handled classified information when she was secretary of state.The Justice Department's goal is to complete the investigation and make recommendations on whether charges should be filed before the two major party conventions take place toward the latter half of July, according to a source familiar with the investigation.Officials want ample time to review Clinton's interview and compare it to everything they have discovered in the months-long investigations, according to the source.Attorney General Loretta Lynch has said she will accept the recommendations of the career prosecutors and investigators regarding the case.Questions were raised about whether Lynch would be impartial after it was revealed that she and former President Bill Clinton met privately during a chance encounter on the tarmac at Sky Harbor International Airport in Phoenix earlier this week."Certainly, my meeting with him raises questions and concerns," Lynch acknowledged on Friday. "It has now cast a shadow over how this case may be perceived, no matter how it's resolved. ... [But] it's important to make it clear that that meeting with President Clinton does not have a bearing on how this matter is going to be reviewed, resolved and accepted by me."She added, however: "I certainly wouldn't do it again."Both Lynch and Bill Clinton have insisted the meeting was completely "social," focusing on grandchildren, golf, travel, the Brexit vote, “and things like that," as Lynch put it.Last year, it was revealed that Clinton had exclusively used her family's private email server for official communications during her tenure as secretary of state. The official communications included thousands of emails that were later marked classified by the U.S. State Department.
    Read more...