• iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- Presumptive GOP nominee Donald Trump took to Twitter Tuesday to express outrage over the cost to taxpayers for President Obama’s campaign trip to Charlotte, North Carolina with Hillary Clinton.But what is the actual cost to taxpayers?
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  • ABC/ Ida Mae Astute(WASHINGTON) -- The FBI said Tuesday that Hillary Clinton and her staff were "extremely careless" in handling classified data on her private email server but stopped short of recommending criminal charges against the former secretary of state.The discovery of her email practices and the FBI investigation could still have an impact on the presumptive Democratic nominee's campaign.Why the FBI Is Not Recommending ChargesThe FBI spent months looking into whether Clinton intentionally mishandled any classified information and whether her private email server had been compromised.FBI Director James Comey said his team uncovered more than 100 emails that contained information that was classified. FBI investigators also found thousands of work-related emails that were not included in the 30,000 emails Clinton handed over to the State Department.But Comey said the FBI didn’t believe those emails were intentionally concealed from investigators."Bottom line is that this case is over from a legal perspective," said Sunny Hostin, a senior legal analyst at ABC News. "The crime the FBI was investigating is the crime of unauthorized disclosure of classified information, which requires specific intent. Hillary Clinton has repeatedly said she didn't intend to disclose classified information."Attorney General Loretta Lynch previously said she would accept the FBI recommendations after the probe was completed.What Happens Next?Despite the FBI's finding of carelessness by Clinton and her staff, Comey said "no reasonable prosecutor would bring such a case.""Our assessment is that like many email users, Secretary Clinton periodically deleted emails or emails were purged from her system when devices were changed," he said.He added that there were occasions when her email could have been compromised, although the agency did not discover evidence that her email was successfully hacked.Clinton's use of a personal email account to conduct official business has been criticized by the State Department's independent watchdog group as a violation of department policy.There is no indication that a grand jury will hear evidence related to the investigation, and most of Clinton’s work emails have already been made public under the Freedom of Information Act.Clinton spokesman Brian Fallon responded to Tuesday's announcement in a statement, saying, "We are pleased that the career officials handling this case have determined that no further action by the department is appropriate. As the secretary has long said, it was a mistake to use her personal email, and she would not do it again. We are glad that this matter is now resolved."What's at Stake?The FBI's probe into Clinton's email use as secretary of state caused a political firestorm in the middle of a heated presidential race."While I respect the law enforcement professionals at the FBI, this announcement defies explanation. No one should be above the law," said House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., in a statement. "But based upon the director's own statement, it appears damage is being done to the rule of law. Declining to prosecute Secretary Clinton for recklessly mishandling and transmitting national security information will set a terrible precedent."The case has been subject to intense scrutiny, and Republicans have maintained that her use of a private server endangered sensitive national security material.After the FBI’s announcement, presumptive Republican nominee Donald Trump was quick to react, posting to Twitter that Gen. David Petraeus got in "trouble for far less."While commanding U.S. forces in Afghanistan, Petraeus kept copious notes that contained highly classified information, including code names for operations. He kept those books of those notes improperly secured at his home and later handed them to his mistress for the purpose of writing his biography.He also lied to investigators about possessing the books and sharing them with his biographer, according to t
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  • ABC News(NEW YORK) -- FBI Director James Comey's recommendation that Justice Department prosecutors not pursue charges against Hillary Clinton for using a private email server during her tenure as secretary of state is "very unfair” and another example of a “rigged” system, presumptive Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump said Tuesday.Trump also repeated his oft-used comparison that former CIA director General David Petraeus "got in trouble for far less" than Clinton did for using a private email server.
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  • ABC News(WASHINGTON) -- Tuesday's bombshell announcement from FBI Director James Comey regarding Hillary Clinton's use of a private email server underscores discrepancies between what the agency found in its yearlong investigation and what Clinton has publicly said about her email use.Even though the FBI said it "cannot find a case that would support bringing criminal charges," there were several areas where Comey made it clear that Clinton and her team mishandled her email.Clinton's First Remarks on Email ServerClinton addressed her email server in a press conference at the United Nations on March 10, 2015."When I got to work as secretary of state, I opted for convenience to use my personal email account, which was allowed by the State Department, because I thought it would be easier to carry just one device for my work and for my personal emails instead of two ... Looking back, it would've been better if I'd simply used a second email account and carried a second phone, but at the time, this didn't seem like an issue," she said.What the Investigation FoundAlthough employees were allowed to send and receive emails via a private email account under certain circumstances, Clinton's exclusive use of a private server was a violation of the rules, according to the inspector general's report.The report also said the inspector general "found no evidence that the secretary requested or obtained guidance or approval to conduct official business via a personal email account on her private server" and that she did not meet her "obligation to discuss using her personal email account to conduct official business." Had she done so, the report says, the relevant management offices "would not approve her exclusive reliance on a personal email account to conduct department business, because of the restrictions in the FAM [foreign affairs manual] and the security risks in doing so."In the process of the investigation, the FBI determined that Clinton was not the first secretary of state to use a personal email address. Colin Powell and aides to Condoleezza Rice used private email accounts to handle classified information during their tenures at the State Department.Clinton Said She Handed Over All Work EmailsAt that March 2015 press conference at the U.N., Clinton said that after she left office, "the State Department asked former secretaries of state for our assistance in providing copies of work-related emails from our personal accounts. I responded right away and provided all my emails that could possibly be work-related, which totaled roughly 55,000 printed pages, even though I knew that the State Department already had the vast majority of them. We went through a thorough process to identify all of my work-related emails and deliver them to the State Department."What the Investigation FoundIt's "likely" that there were work-related emails that were not handed over to investigators, Comey said."The lawyers doing the sorting for Secretary Clinton in 2014 did not individually read the content of all of her emails, as we did for those available to us," he said Tuesday.He said that Clinton's legal team used the email subject information and the results of certain searches for key terms to determine which messages were work-related."It's highly likely that their search missed some work-related emails and that we later found them," Comey said.Clinton Said Server Was SecureThe personal server that was used to house accounts under the clintonemail.com domain was stored for much of her tenure as secretary of state at the Clinton family residence in Chappaqua, New York. That server was previously used by her husband, former President Bill Clinton."It was on property guarded by the Secret Service. And there were no security breaches. So I think that the — the use of that server, which started with my husband, certainly proved to be effective and secure," she said in March 2015.What the Investigation FoundComey said Tuesday there were some occasi
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  • ABC News(WASHINGTON) — FBI Director James Comey said Tuesday that the agency is not recommending any charges be filed against Hillary Clinton as a result of the investigation into her use of a private email server while serving as secretary of state."Although there is evidence of potential violations of the statutes regarding the handling of classified information, our judgment is that no reasonable prosecutor would bring such a case," Comey said.He said that the FBI spent "a tremendous amount of work over the last year" and now the case is headed to the Department of Justice "for a prosecutive decision."Comey noted that investigators read all of Clinton's 30,000 emails that were provided to the State Department in 2014.The announcement comes three days after Clinton's spokesperson confirmed that she had a "voluntary" meeting with investigators over her use of a personal email server during her time as secretary of state.A Clinton aide said the interview lasted about three-and-a-half hours at the FBI headquarters in Washington, D.C.Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • ABCNews.com(WASHINGTON) -- The FBI has released the remarks prepared for FBI Director James Comey on the agency's investigation of presumptive Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton's use of a private email server during her time as secretary of state. The FBI recommended to Department of Justice prosecutors that they not file charges against Clinton. After delivering remarks, Comey did not take questions from reporters.PREPARED REMARKS:Good morning. I’m here to give you an update on the FBI’s investigation of Secretary Clinton’s use of a personal e-mail system during her time as Secretary of State.After a tremendous amount of work over the last year, the FBI is completing its investigation and referring the case to the Department of Justice for a prosecutive decision. What I would like to do today is tell you three things: what we did; what we found; and what we are recommending to the Department of Justice.This will be an unusual statement in at least a couple ways. First, I am going to include more detail about our process than I ordinarily would, because I think the American people deserve those details in a case of intense public interest. Second, I have not coordinated or reviewed this statement in any way with the Department of Justice or any other part of the government. They do not know what I am about to say.I want to start by thanking the FBI employees who did remarkable work in this case. Once you have a better sense of how much we have done, you will understand why I am so grateful and proud of their efforts.So, first, what we have done:The investigation began as a referral from the Intelligence Community Inspector General in connection with Secretary Clinton’s use of a personal e-mail server during her time as Secretary of State. The referral focused on whether classified information was transmitted on that personal system.Our investigation looked at whether there is evidence classified information was improperly stored or transmitted on that personal system, in violation of a federal statute making it a felony to mishandle classified information either intentionally or in a grossly negligent way, or a second statute making it a misdemeanor to knowingly remove classified information from appropriate systems or storage facilities.Consistent with our counterintelligence responsibilities, we have also investigated to determine whether there is evidence of computer intrusion in connection with the personal e-mail server by any foreign power, or other hostile actors.I have so far used the singular term, “e-mail server,” in describing the referral that began our investigation. It turns out to have been more complicated than that. Secretary Clinton used several different servers and administrators of those servers during her four years at the State Department, and used numerous mobile devices to view and send e-mail on that personal domain. As new servers and equipment were employed, older servers were taken out of service, stored, and decommissioned in various ways. Piecing all of that back together—to gain as full an understanding as possible of the ways in which personal e-mail was used for government work—has been a painstaking undertaking, requiring thousands of hours of effort.For example, when one of Secretary Clinton’s original personal servers was decommissioned in 2013, the e-mail software was removed. Doing that didn’t remove the e-mail content, but it was like removing the frame from a huge finished jigsaw puzzle and dumping the pieces on the floor. The effect was that millions of e-mail fragments end up unsorted in the server’s unused—or “slack”—space. We searched through all of it to see what was there, and what parts of the puzzle could be put back together.FBI investigators have also read all of the approximately 30,000 e-mails provided by Secretary Clinton to the State Department in December 2014. Where an e-mail was a
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