• US Congress(WASHINGTON) -- Rep. Adam Schiff slammed Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ decision to open the door for the Department of Justice to appoint a special prosecutor to investigate former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton’s role in helping approve the sale of American uranium stockpiles to a Russian company — a deal known as Uranium One.“The threat to our democracy right now comes less from the Russians and more from the internal damage that we are doing to ourselves,” Schiff, a ranking member of the House Intelligence Committee, told ABC News’ Powerhouse Politics.“If Jeff Sessions and the Justice Department go along with this, it will be an obliteration of independence of the Justice Department. We will be nothing more than the countries that we criticize where the winning party tries to prosecute the losing party,” he said.Schiff’s comments come on the heels of Sessions’ testimony before the House Judiciary Committee on Tuesday -- an appearance that included tough questions from lawmakers about the Trump campaign’s contact with Russian officials and the Kremlin’s interference in the 2016 elections.Schiff sees the push to investigate the Uranium One deal as a move aimed at deflecting any attention away from Sessions’ involvement in the Russia probes by multiple congressional committees.Schiff said Trump campaign associates have a “selective memory” when it comes to communications with the Russians. On the question of a March 2016 event that Russian President Vladimir Putin, Trump campaign foreign policy adviser George Papadopoulos and Sessions all attended, Sessions stated that "I did not recall this event, which occurred 18 months before my testimony of a few weeks ago."“You see people around the president and his campaign that have very selective memories about the facts of their interactions with Russians -- during the campaign and after campaign,” he added.Sessions’ testimony on Monday “is very much a part of that pattern” Schiff said.Schiff said he believes that Trump actively and knowingly works to “deny, obfuscate, deflect” any ties to Russia.However, the lawmaker sees it as a “mistake” to talk about the impeachment of President Trump, “We haven't finished the investigations yet. Bob Mueller has not finished his work yet ... I don’t think it is wise to do this prematurely ... I think we ought to let the investigations run their course.”Six House Democrats introduced five articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump Wednesday. Most notably for his obstruction of justice for interfering in the Russia investigation. Rep. Al Green, D-Texas, told reporters at a news conference on Capitol Hill "Article II Section IV of the Constitution of the United States of America was drafted for a time such as this and a president such as Trump."Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • Photo by Wes Frazer/Getty Images(BIRMINGHAM, Ala.) -- Six women have accused Republican Senate candidate Roy Moore of sexual misconduct or impropriety.He has denied any wrongdoing and points to a political conspiracy as the reason why the allegations are being made public now.Four of the accusers were named in a Washington Post article, with a fifth accuser telling her story in a news conference Monday and a sixth describing an alleged encounter with Moore in an AL.com story Wednesday.Here is a summary of the accusations against Moore and what he has said about each case.Leigh CorfmanCorfman spoke to The Washington Post and accused Moore of making sexual advances toward her.Corfman told the paper that she met Moore outside a courthouse in 1979 where her mother was attending a child custody hearing. Moore, who was then a 32-year-old assistant district attorney, volunteered to wait with the young teen while her mother went inside for the hearing.When they were alone together, Corfman told the paper that Moore asked for her phone number. Corfman said he later picked her up for a drive around the corner from her house and drove her to his house, where Moore kissed her. She alleges that Moore removed his clothes during a second visit and touched Corfman over her underwear and also guided her hand to touch him.On Nov. 10, the day after The Washington Post article was published, Moore spoke to conservative personality Sean Hannity on his radio show and denied the allegations, at times going into specifics about the different allegations.When asked about Corfman, Moore said, “It never happened.”"I don't know Miss Corfman from anybody. I never talked to or never had any contact with her. Allegations of sexual misconduct with her are completely false,” Moore told Hannity."I never knew this woman. I never met this woman and these charges are politically motivated," he added.Wendy MillerWendy Miller, the second woman named in The Washington Post story said that she first met Moore when she was 14 years old and working as a Santa’s Helper at the local mall. She said Moore asked her out on dates two years later but they did not go out because her mother forbade it.During the same interview with Hannity, Moore was asked about both Miller’s claims and then about Corfman’s in the same question, and he pointed to political sabotage as the explanation for all of the allegations."I've run five successful campaigns or five campaigns, statewide campaigns, three in the county. This has never been brought up. It has never been even mentioned and all of a sudden, four weeks out, they're bringing out -- they're bringing up -- because it's political. It's a direct attack on this campaign and it involves a 14-year-old girl, which I would have never had any contact with -- nothing with her mother or any courthouse or anywhere else -- would I have done that,” he told Hannity.Debbie Wesson GibsonDebbie Wesson Gibson told The Washington Post that she was 17 years old when she met Moore after he spoke to her high school civics class. Gibson told the paper that it was then that Moore asked her out on several dates “that did not progress beyond kissing."Moore said that he did recognize the maiden name of this accuser, Debbie Wesson, and a subsequent accuser, but denied the allegations."I do not remember speaking to civics class. I don't remember that. I do not remember when we ... I seem to know or remember knowing her parents ... that they were friends. I can't recall the specific dates because that's been 40 years, but I remember her as a good girl. But neither of them have ever stated any inappropriate behavior. She didn't say anything,” Moore told Hannity on the same program.Moore said that he doesn’t “remember specific dates." Hannity then asked him again, “You never dated her ever? Is that what you’re saying?”"No, but I don't remember going out on dates. I knew her as a fr
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  • Photo by Jonathan Bachman/Getty Images(BIRMINGHAM, Ala.) --   The attorney representing embattled GOP Senate candidate Roy Moore defended him Wednesday against the sexual misconduct allegations that have driven many in the GOP to call on Moore to drop out of the race.In a press conference outside of the Alabama GOP headquarters in Birmingham Wednesday afternoon, Moore's attorney Phillip Jauregui and Moore's campaign chairman Bill Armistead stood by the candidate and challenged the story of one of Moore's accusers, Beverly Young Nelson."In the cases where it's true, it's horrible for the person making the accusations," Jauregui said, "When the allegations are made and it's not true, it's also horrible for who the allegations are directed against."Among the challenges to Young's story presented by Jauregui was the assertion that the handwriting in the yearbook Nelson held up at a presser earlier this week with attorney Gloria Allred does not match other samples of Moore's handwriting. Jauregui said that Moore's legal team has sent a letter to Allred demanding the original copy of the yearbook be released so that a "neutral custodian" can examine the handwriting.Jauregui also referenced that in 1999, when Moore was a circuit court judge in Alabama, the candidate's signature appears on documents relating to Nelson's divorce from her husband at the time, Ervine Lee Harris. Moore's signature does appear on documents obtained by ABC News related to Nelson's divorce proceedings from 1999.In the press conference in which she detailed the alleged misconduct by Moore, Nelson did not reference that Moore had signed an order relating to her divorce case.Neither Jauregui nor Armistead took questions from the media during the press conference.In a statement released Wednesday responding to Moore's attorney, Allred said she would release the original yearbook on the condition that the Senate Judiciary Committee and/or the Senate Select Committee on Ethics hold hearings regarding the allegations against Moore, and again said Nelson is willing to testify under oath regarding Moore's misconduct."The time has come for Roy Moore to announce whether he is willing to be examined under oath concerning his conduct with regard to the five accusers before the Senate Committees," she said.Allred also urged the committees to "subpoena Roy Moore to testify under oath about his denials of the accusations made against him."Moore has remained defiant in the face of growing pressure from top Republicans like Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., and House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., who have called for him to step aside and have suggested a write-in challenger should enter the race against Moore.
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  • ABC News(WASHINGTON) -- President Donald Trump took a swig from Marco Rubio’s playbook Wednesday, pausing twice during a speech promoting his administration's foreign policy achievements and trade matters to drink from a bottle of Fiji water.The moments immediately led many on social media to recall a similar moment featuring Sen. Marco Rubio. In 2013 Rubio awkwardly stopped during his Republican response to President Barack Obama's State of the Union address to drink from a bottle of water.At the time, Trump himself mocked Rubio on Twitter, writing, "Next time Marco Rubio should drink his water from a glass as opposed to a bottle—would have much less negative impact.Rubio took notice of Wednesday's moment, tweeting shortly after Trump's speech: "Similar, but needs work on his form. Has to be done in one single motion & eyes should never leave the camera. But not bad for his 1st time."According to the company, which is headquartered in Los Angeles, Fiji Water is bottled and shipped from Fiji.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • Credit: Architect of the Capitol(WASHINGTON) -- As Republicans continue to disagree about how best to pivot in the wake of sexual misconduct allegations against Roy Moore, Democrats in Washington D.C. have largely decided to stay clear from the Alabama special election next month and let their party’s nominee, Doug Jones, run his own campaign.The decision from some national organizations to hold back could be a strategic one, but smaller, more grassroots groups on the left worry the party as a whole is squandering a unique moment to build out their infrastructure and communities in a deep red-state.“[Jones] is raising tremendous money without any help from the Democratic organizations,” Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer told reporters on Monday. “When they ask us for help, we’ll do it, but it’s been an Alabama race, period.”Staff at the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee echoed the Minority Leader and told ABC News that if Jones asked for last-minute financial or volunteer help they could still step in. They added that, for now, his team was in good shape and had enough money, they said, to keep campaign ads on the air through next month’s highly-publicized special election.Beth Clayton, the national committeewoman for Alabama Young Democrats, during a phone interview with ABC News, said she worried an influx of outside money could backfire.Clayton wants to make sure Jones' campaign has the resources it needs to capitalize on this moment. However, she keenly remembers the Georgia 6th Congressional District special election over the summer in which an infusion of millions in donations and heightened attention from Democrats across the nation potentially hurt the Democratic candidate, Jon Ossoff, with local voters.“I think [Jones] has a fantastic chance, but I don’t know what the impact would be of national money coming in,” Clayton, who has been volunteering for Jones, told ABC News. “I think here in Alabama, people do not necessarily want people to feel like D.C. is coming in and telling them how to vote.”Clayton also cited the Republican primary in Alabama and posited that the state's voters doubled-down on Moore, in part, because Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell spent money for his opponent.“People here want to feel like it’s our election, it’s our decision. If people are seeing Chuck Schumer, well, that does not sell well down here. Those are not names people identify with,” she said.The race in Alabama was already more competitive than expected.With a strong candidate in Jones and Moore’s history of divisive, controversial statements, Democrats saw a possible — albeit, long-shot — path to victory, even before the allegations of sexual misconduct against Moore broke in the news last week.A former Alabama U.S. attorney well-known in the state for prosecuting Ku Klux Klan members in 2002 who were responsible for the historic 1963 Birmingham church bombing, Jones has run a campaign focused on jobs and health care and taken advantage of both the energy and small dollar fundraising of networks on the left as well as his appeal to both independents and moderate Republicans.Still, advisers working closely with the National Democratic Committee expressed concerns similar to Clayton’s.One top Democratic adviser said while Jones may be closing a gap, an influx of formal party money now would unlikely be what ends up tipping this race.Neil Sroka, the communications director at Democracy for America pushed back.“I think that is an excuse for not investing in the race,” Sroka told ABC over the phone. “Sure, if it is just a bunch of DC hacks parachuting in and dropping a boat-load on ads, yes, that probably is not going to be super helpful, but that is not a reason to sit out the race, that is a reason to find new ways to support a race like the one Doug Jones is running.”The
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  • Credit: Architect of the Capitol(WASHINGTON) -- Six House Democrats introduced five articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump Wednesday – from obstruction of justice for interfering in the Russia investigation to making charges of fake news against the media from the bully pulpit.“Article II Section IV of the Constitution of the United States of America was drafted for a time such as this and a president such as Trump,” Rep. Al Green, D-Texas, told reporters at a news conference at the Capitol. “This president has committed misdeeds that merit impeachment.”The five articles of impeachment the lawmakers introduced Wednesday are:1. Obstruction of justice regarding the Russia investigation and firing of FBI Director James Comey
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