• iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- President Donald Trump and his Russian counterpart, Vladimir Putin, spoke over the phone for "more than one hour" Tuesday, discussing efforts to combat terrorism and the situations in North Korea, Ukraine and Syria, according to details provided by the White House.
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  • Alex Wong/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- Former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort and his longtime associate Rick Gates have been given a limited release from house arrest to allow them to travel for Thanksgiving.
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  • Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images(NEW YORK ) -- Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-MA, compared President Donald Trump's presidency to "dog years" in an interview with "The Late Show" on Monday. The comment came after "The Late Show" host Stephen Colbert pointed out that she hadn’t been on the show since the start of Trump’s presidency. “Oh, I remember those days,” Warren said with a smile. “How long has he been president now?” “Forty-five years ... If my bone density is any indication,” Colbert replied. “That's right. They were dog years, now they're Trump years. It's going to be hard,” Warren joked.” Warren also hit back at Trump for referring to her as “Pocahontas” in a tweet earlier this month. “Donald Trump thinks if he's going to start every one of these tweets to me with some kind of racist slur here that he's going to shut me up,” the senator said. “It didn't work in the past, it's not going to work in the future.” Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- The tax plan advanced by House Republicans last week will spur economic growth, but still add more than $1 trillion to the deficit, according to a new study released Monday.The macroeconomic analysis from the Tax Policy Center, a joint venture of the Brookings Institution and the Urban Institute, finds that the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act would boost economic output by .6 percent of gross domestic product in 2018, and .3 percent in a decade.The economic growth would provide $169 billion in additional tax revenue for the federal government over the next decade, according to the analysis. The entire tax package is expected to add $1.4 trillion to the deficit over the same period of time.The White House and congressional Republicans, who have criticized the Tax Policy Center’s findings in the past, have said passing the plan will spur economic growth that will offset the tax cuts in the package.The TPC had to revise its initial analysis of the House plan over a computing error.The House plan will not make it to President Donald Trump’s desk unchanged: Senate Republicans will vote next week on their own version of the tax bill, which will then be reconciled with the House-passed proposal.While Senate Republicans and the White House also support repealing Obamacare’s individual health insurance mandate as part of the plan, White House budget director Mick Mulvaney said Sunday that Trump could also forego the mandate repeal to help the proposal clear the House and Senate.“If a good tax bill can pass with that Obamacare mandate repeal as part of it, great. If it needs to come out in order for that good tax bill to pass, we can live with that as well,” Mulvaney said in an interview with CBS News’ "Face the Nation."In a separate study released Monday, the Tax Policy Center found that the Senate proposal would reduce taxes on average for all income groups in 2019 and 2025.Roughly 10 percent of taxpayers would pay higher taxes compared to current law under the proposal in 2019, a number that would rise to 50 percent in 2027, according to the analysis.
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  • ABCNews.com(WASHINGTON) -- President Donald Trump's namesake charitable foundation is being shut down, in keeping with previously announced plans.In a filing with the IRS last week, the foundation said it intends to dissolve and is seeking approval to distribute its remaining funds. The documents were posted publicly on Guidestar.org and reviewed by ABC News."The foundation continues to cooperate with the New York attorney general's charities division, and as previously announced by the president, his advisers are working with the charities division to wind up the affairs of the foundation. The foundation looks forward to distributing its remaining assets at the earliest possible time to aid numerous worthy charitable organizations," a spokesperson for the Trump Foundation told ABC News.In December, when Trump was president-elect, he announced plans to shutter the Trump Foundation "to avoid even the appearance of any conflict with my role as president.""I have decided to continue to pursue my strong interest in philanthropy in other ways," he added.The organization had come under scrutiny for its practices.Last year the Trump Foundation conceded that it gave "income or assets" to a "disqualified person" — a prohibited practice known as self-dealing — according to a 2015 tax filing obtained by ABC News. It was not clear from the filing how much was given or to whom.New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman launched the investigation into the Trump Foundation in 2016 over a donation that was made to a political fundraising group associated with Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi. He ordered that the foundation stop fundraising late last year.At the end of 2016, the Trump Foundation had a little more than $970,000 in assets, according to last week's filing.Even though his name is the basis for the charity, Trump was never the biggest contributor, according to the organization's 990 forms for 2001 through 2014.Trump made contributions to the foundation from 2001 to 2008, but he is not listed as making any financial contributions since then. His contributions ranged from $713,000 in 2004 to $30,000 in 2008; his total contributions to his foundation are in excess of $2.7 million.Earlier this year, the New York Attorney General's Office also launched an investigation into the Eric Trump Foundation after questions were raised about the charity in light of a media report that it paid large sums to use Trump-owned properties for fundraisers.
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  • ABC News(NEW YORK) -- Travels by Trump campaign adviser Carter Page to meet with senior officials in Hungary during the 2016 presidential election are being closely examined by congressional investigators, given the increasingly close ties between Hungary and Russia and the role of the country as a hub for Russian intelligence activity. The Hungarian prime minister was the first foreign leader to endorse Donald Trump’s candidacy.Though characterized as a low-level volunteer, Page held high-level foreign policy meetings with Hungarian officials before the 2016 presidential election, ABC News has learned.The meetings included a 45-minute session in September 2016 with Jeno Megyesy, who is a close adviser to the Hungarian prime minister and focuses on relations with the United States, at his office in Budapest, where Page presented himself as a member of then-candidate Donald Trump’s foreign policy team.Megyesy confirmed to ABC News in an interview Friday that he met with Page at the request of Reka Szemerkenyi, the Hungarian ambassador to the U.S. Megyesy said he did most of the talking at the meeting because Page did not appear to be well versed on the issues facing the region.“I had the impression he didn’t deal with these issues on a regular basis,” Megyesy said.Page’s visit to Budapest drew notice from members of the House Intelligence Committee investigating Russian interference in the 2016 election. Hungary’s prime minister, who was the first world leader to endorse then-candidate Trump, has become increasingly aligned with Russian President Vladamir Putin, and Budapest is considered by experts to be a central hub for Russian intelligence activity.When questioned by Rep. Adam Schiff of California, the ranking Democrat on the committee, during a hearing in early November, however, Page had only hazy memories of the trip. He said that he remembered seeing a Hungarian official, but he could not recall who it was.“You don’t remember the names of anyone you met with or what their positions were in the Hungarian government?” Schiff asked, according to transcripts of the closed-door session.“Not right now,” Page replied. “I can’t recall.”Page told the members he could only barely remember the visit, saying “the detailed specifics of that are a distant memory,” but Schiff was incredulous.“You went all the way to Budapest, and you can’t remember who you met with and what you hoped to accomplish?” he asked.According to Megyesy, he spoke to Page in his office in the ornate parliament building, a sprawling landmark along the Danube River that draws legions of tourists. Their conversation covered a range of topics, Megyesy said, including the recent strain in relations between the U.S. and Hungary.“I walked him through the politics and the issues with respect to Hungary,” Megyesy said.Page held another meeting in Budapest, this one with Szemerkenyi, who was also in the city at the time, for coffee at a hotel, according to one person familiar with the meeting. Page initially met Szemerkenyi at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland. The two met a third time in October at an embassy function in Washington, she said.“When Mr. Page went to Budapest, I was on a scheduled visit back home and met with him for courtesy meetings,” Szemerkenyi told ABC News in a written statement. “Our conversations were friendly, discussing only general foreign policy issues.”The infamous 35-page dossier detailing unverified intelligence gathered by a former British spy hired to dig up damaging information on then-candidate Trump, contains allegations that Page held secret meetings with Russian officials during a visit to Moscow in July. Page has flatly denied the dossier’s assertion and frequently derides the document as the “dodgy dossier.”Megyesy said no outsiders attended his m
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