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  • ABC News(WASHINGTON) -- A former Homeland Security secretary said the fight against Russian election meddling should put internet companies rather than the government in charge of regulating content on social media.Jeh Johnson, who headed the Department of Homeland Security in President Barack Obama’s second term, told ABC News' This Week Co-Anchor Martha Raddatz on Sunday that he is concerned about government security agencies getting involved in "regulating free speech."“When it comes to Facebook and social media and speech that appears on social media, I think that the security agencies of our government need to be very careful in trying to delve into this whole topic,” Johnson said.He said the onus should be on internet service providers to guard against the use of fake social media accounts or other means for trying to interfere in U.S. elections or politics.“I think that the answer has to be that those that provide access on the internet do more to self-regulate, to do more to make attribution to those who gain access to the information marketplace," the former Homeland Security secretary said. "We are a society of free speech, and we need to be careful not to get security agencies of our government involved in regulating free speech.”Johnson's comments came after the special counsel probing alleged interference in the 2016 presidential election on Friday charged 13 Russian nationals and three Russian groups with violating the law with the intent of meddling with "U.S. elections and political processes."Chris Christie, an ABC News contributor who was formerly New Jersey governor and a federal prosecutor, said the indictment was "incredibly detailed and gave the American people, for the first time, a real picture into the scope of at least part of the operation that was obviously meant to disparage and damage Hillary Clinton."
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  • ABC News(WASHINGTON) -- A Democratic congressman who represents the Florida district where a school shooting last week killed 17 students and teachers said President Donald Trump needs to "talk to these kids and their families."Rep. Ted Deutch told ABC News' This Week Co-Anchor Martha Raddatz that the reform of gun laws that some survivors of the Feb. 14 shooting are demanding could happen if the president meets directly with teens at the Parkland high school who survived the rampage.Trump needs to “come to Parkland and talk to these kids and their families and everyone who has suffered. That's what should happen. That's how change will come,” Deutch said.The Democratic representative added that the student survivors of the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School who are demanding gun control are "just not going to sit back after what they experienced, after what they saw -- the worst things imaginable. They're not just going to sit back and take it. They're going to stand up for their lives."A Republican congressman from Florida, Rep. Carlos Curbelo, who appeared on This Week with Deutch, agreed that “something has to happen.”Curbelo noted that he has co-sponsored gun reform legislation, such as a bill to ban bump stocks, attachments that can make semi-automatic rifles fire faster and that were used in a mass shooting in Las Vegas on Oct. 1. “Co-sponsorship is the most important currency in the Capitol,” he said."I think I am part of that new generation that refuses to see this as a black or white issue where we either do everything or we do nothing," Curbelo said. "We can meet in the middle on this issue."Deutch said survivors of the shooting “don't want to hear about co-sponsoring” of legislation. He faulted Curbelo for supporting Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis., to lead the House of Representatives, saying Ryan “refuses to bring” gun reform legislation up for a vote.Curbelo "should talk to the speaker," Deutch said. "He should come to the speaker with those kids" from Stoneman Douglas High School.
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  • Chris Kleponis/Pool/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- Rob Porter may be the latest man President Donald Trump defended amid assault allegations, but he wasn't the first.The president himself has faced repeated allegations of sexual misconduct or assault, saying that all of the women who have accused him are "liars."That isn't the exact same approach Trump used for Rob Porter, his now-former White House staff secretary, and other men close to him when they've faced either assault, sexual assault or sexual misconduct allegations in the past.Rob PorterThree days after detailed allegations of Porter's alleged spousal abuse were made public, and two days after photos of the alleged abuse were released, Trump weighed in and praised Porter's work, saying he did "a very good job while he was in the White House."Porter has denied the allegations, despite graphic photos of one ex-wife with facial bruising and a black eye, and a haunting description of violence from a second ex-wife.Making remarks in the Oval Office on Feb. 9, Trump said he hopes Porter has "a great career ahead of him.”Trump said the allegations were "very sad" and said it was "obviously a tough time.""It was very sad when we heard about it. And certainly, he's also very sad. Now he also, as you probably know -- he says he's innocent and I think you have to remember that," Trump said.Five days later -- after his initial remarks about Porter -- Trump made another statement, saying he is "totally opposed" to domestic violence and did not specifically tie the comments to the accusations against Porter."I am totally opposed to domestic violence, and everybody here knows that," Trump said on Feb. 14. "I am totally opposed to domestic violence of any kind. Everyone knows that."Roy MooreBack in November, ahead of the special election to fill the Senate spot in Alabama vacated by Jeff Sessions, Trump publicly weighed in on the embattled Republican candidate Roy Moore.Trump spoke of the multiple allegations of sexual misconduct against Moore -- and sided with him."You have to listen to him also,” Trump said, adding, “He totally denies it.”Moore was accused by eight women of sexual misconduct or impropriety. He denied those claims.Bill O'ReillyTrump defended former Fox News host Bill O'Reilly after an April 1 New York Times report that described settlements he reached with five women who accused him of harassment. O'Reilly denied the misconduct claims.Trump, who has known O'Reilly for years, told the Times that O'Reilly is "a person I know well" and "a good person" and that he didn't think "Bill did anything wrong.""Personally, I think he shouldn’t have settled," Trump said.Roger AilesAfter Roger Ailes stepped down as Fox News chairman and CEO, Trump praised him and said, "He's been a friend of mine for a long time."Ailes' resignation came after former anchor Gretchen Carlson left Fox News on June 23 and, shortly afterward, filed a lawsuit against her former boss. Fox News and Ailes, who later died in May 2017, had denied Carlson's allegations.Carlson was one of several women, including Megyn Kelly, who came forward with allegations of impropriety against Ailes during his tenure at Fox. Then-candidate Trump came to his defense."Some of the women that are complaining -- I know how much he's helped them," Trump said during an appearance on Meet the Press in July 2016.He added, "Now all of a sudden, they are saying these horrible things about him. It's very sad because he's a very good person. I've always found him to be just a very, very good person."Corey LewandowskiIn March 2016, Trump's then-campaign manager Corey Lewandowski was accused of grabbing a female reporter after a campaign event, and Trump's campaign responded with a statement from then-campaign press secretary Hope Hicks saying the accusation was "entirely false."Trump himself weighed in two days later, after the March 10 Republican primary debate."Everybody said nothing happened. Perhaps she
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  • Win McNamee/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- The Justice Department on Friday indicted 13 Russian nationals and three Russian groups of violating criminal laws with the intent to interfere "with U.S. elections and political processes," according to the agency.The indictment depicts an elaborate scheme in which some of the Russians accused allegedly came to the U.S. with the deliberate intention of undermining the American political and electoral process, including the 2016 presidential election.Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein said the Russians charged called their work "information warfare against the United States" with the goal of spreading distrust of candidates and the political system in general.Some defendants "communicated with unwitting individuals associated with the Trump campaign" without revealing their association with Russia. The indictment also says the defendants posted negative information about a number of candidates during the last general election.The individuals operated social media pages and groups designed to attract American audiences with a strategic goal to "sow discord in the U.S. political system". They staged rallies and had a basic infrastructure which included computers and other support systems.Ultimately, the "defendants' operations included supporting the presidential campaign on then-candidate Donald J. Trump and disparaging Hillary Clinton" his Democratic rival, according to the indictment.According to the agency, "the indictment charges all of the defendants with conspiracy to defraud the United States, three defendants with conspiracy to commit wire fraud and bank fraud, and five defendants with aggravated identity theft."
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- Thirteen Russian nationals and three Russian groups were indicted for allegedly trying to interfere with "U.S. elections and political processes," according to the Justice Department.The 37-page indictment details the elaborate alleged scheme in which some of the Russians accused supposedly came to the U.S. with the intention of undermining the American political and electoral process, including the 2016 presidential election. Read the full text here. Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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