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  • ABC News(WASHINGTON) -- President Donald Trump said Monday that he intends to declare North Korea a state sponsor of terror.This is a breaking news story. Please check back for updates.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • Cindy Ord/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- Just over two years ago, then-Vice President Joe Biden announced that he would not run to succeed President Barack Obama in the 2016 presidential election. This week, he admitted he regrets that he doesn't currently occupy the Oval Office given the potential he sees in the United States."I regret that I am not president because I think there is so much opportunity," Biden told Oprah Winfrey in a clip from an OWN Network interview aired exclusively by Good Morning America on Thursday. "I think America is so incredibly well-positioned."Biden, who served eight years as Obama's vice president after 36 years in the U.S. Senate, said he did not have second thoughts, however, about the reason why he passed up the opportunity to enter the race."I don't regret the decision I made because it was the right decision for my family," he said.When Biden announced in October 2015 that he would not be a candidate in the following year's Democratic presidential primary, he was less than five months removed from the death of his son Beau, a former Delaware attorney general, due to brain cancer at the age of 46. Only six weeks after Biden's election to the Senate in 1972, his wife Neila and daughter Naomi were killed in an automobile accident that seriously injured Beau and son Hunter.The former vice president explained that in order for one to decide to announce whether he or she is running for president, they need to be able to answer two questions."One: Do they truly believe they are the most qualified person for that moment? I believed I was," Biden said. "But, was I prepared to be able to give my whole heart, my whole soul and all my attention to the endeavor?"I knew I wasn't."Reflecting on the tragedies that have befallen him personally as he wrote his forthcoming book, "Promise Me Dad: A Year of Hope, Hardship and Purpose," Biden said he recalled a conversation he had with his mother Catherine "Jean" Finnegan Biden just after the deaths of his wife and daughter in which she encouraged him to persevere."She said, 'Joey grab my hand. ... Out of everything horrible, something good will come if you look hard enough for it,'" he told Winfrey. "That was my mother's notion. We were taught just to get up. When you get knocked down, just get up and move forward."Many of those early lessons came during Biden's childhood in Scranton, Pennsylvania, the blue-collar northeastern Pennsylvania city he would reference with frequency while on the campaign trail in 2008 and 2012. Winfrey noted that in those days, Biden was known as "a boy with a vision" who knew from a young age the kind of person he wanted to grow up to be. Asked if he fulfilled his vision, Biden said yes, but said it wasn't a matter of his professional achievements."I wanted to live up to my parent's expectations and I wanted to be that person that met my mother's standard, being defined by my courage," he said. "I wanted to be that person who, no matter what happened, just got back up and kept going. I wanted to be that person who was there and loyal to people who were loyal to him."Biden and Obama's loyalty to each other was frequently on public display in the White House, with the two going so far as to joke about their "bromance." The president entrusted Biden to be the voice of White House advocacy efforts for victims of sexual assault and to spearhead a task force aimed at developing cancer prevention and treatment methods. In an emotional moment in January, Obama surprised Biden, whom he called his "brother," with the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian honor.Since leaving the vice president's office, Biden has not shied away from criticizing President Donald Trump, in particular his handling of the aftermath of a white nationalist rally in Virginia in August and his efforts at diplomacy. In the final month of last year's presidential campaign, Biden remarked that he wished he "could take Trump behind the gym," insinuati
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- ­Newly disclosed documents filed in the case against Paul Manafort and Rick Gates lay out the government's reasons for treating the indicted men as flight risks. Manafort and Gates, both men of substantial wealth and with considerable foreign contacts, are facing 188 and 151 months in prison, respectively, according to the federal sentencing guidelines described by prosecutors. The Special Counsel's Office argued, "The possibility of prison sentences in these ranges alone establishes a risk of flight as to both defendants."Federal Magistrate Deborah Robinson agreed, ordering that both surrender their passports and be placed on house arrest.  The government also asserts in the filings that both men "lied repeatedly to financial bookkeepers, tax accountants, legal counsel, and the government to further their scheme."Some of those lies, the government alleges, had to do with filings required under the Foreign Agents Registration Act (FARA) that Manafort and Gates submitted in November 2016 and February 2017 with the help of an attorney."The Chief Judge recently found that the government made a prima facie showing the defendants used their former attorney (who was not complicit) to convey this false and misleading information to the Department of Justice," the Special Counsels Office (SCO) states in its conditions of release memo.The new filings also disclose that Chief Judge Beryl Howell ordered the attorney to testify before the grand jury, effectively pushing aside the attorney-client privilege.  "When a person uses the attorney-client relationship to further a criminal scheme, the law is well established that a claim of attorney-client or work-product privilege must yield to the grand jury's investigatory needs," Howell wrote in his memorandum opinion."The Court finds that the SCO has made a sufficient prima facie showing that the crime-fraud exception to the attorney-client and work-product privileges applies," Howell added.To some legal observers, this is another sign that Special Counsel Robert Mueller is playing hardball."They are sending a signal of being aggressive," said former federal prosecutor and ABC News consultant Matt Olsen."This is an indication that the investigation is going to turn over every stone and is not going to let any so-called claim of privilege get in the way of finding out the truth," Olsen added. "Attorney client privilege is not a shield to protect ongoing criminal wrongdoing."Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • US Senate(WASHINGTON) --   Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., called out President Donald Trump over his response to domestic terror on Tuesday in the wake of a deadly a truck-ramming attack in New York City."The Trump administration [has] taken the gloves off when it comes to the war on terror overseas," Graham told reporters on Capitol Hill Tuesday evening. "We have to look in our own backyard and see if we have the intelligence network and capability to prevent these attacks."And at the end of the day, if somebody’s committed to dying and take some people with them, it’s hard to stop," he said, but lawmakers must do "everything we can to prevent these things, within our values and within our constitutional framework." Graham’s remarks came just hours after a man killed eight people, and injured more than a dozen others, on a Manhattan bike path Tuesday afternoon.The suspect, Sayfullo Saipov, 29, of Tampa, Florida, was taken into custody after the attack. He was said to have shouted "Allahu Akbar," or "God is Great" in Arabic, at the scene.Trump called the incident "a terrorist attack" in a tweet and referred to the assailant as a "sick and deranged person." Trump later posted another tweet to offer his "thoughts, condolences and prayers to the victims and families" affected by the attack."We must not allow ISIS to return, or enter, our country after defeating them in the Middle East and elsewhere. Enough," he said."I have just ordered Homeland Security to step up our already Extreme Vetting Program. Being politically correct is fine, but not for this," he said in a subsequent tweet.Graham told Fox News that he spoke with Trump after making the remarks on Capitol Hill.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • ABC News(WASHINGTON) -- In his first response to George Papadopoulos' guilty plea, President Donald Trump Tuesday attempted to distance himself from the foreign policy adviser who joined his 2016 campaign and, later, served on a presidential international business advisory council.  "Few people knew the young, low level volunteer named George, who has already proven to be a liar," Trump tweeted Tuesday morning.Papadopoulos pleaded guilty earlier this month to lying to FBI officials about his communications with Russian nationals in an effort to arrange a meeting between the Trump campaign and Russian officials. Special counsel Robert Mueller's team unsealed the documents in the case against Papadopoulos Monday as part of its investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 election.Trump's lawyer personal lawyer Jay Sekulow argued on "Good Morning America" today that Papadopoulos' offense was "no crime of collusion." Papadopoulos was most recently serving as an independent oil, gas and policy consultant for the International Presidential Business Advisory Council, according to information from his LinkedIn account.Papadopoulos was only a volunteer on the campaign and that his role was "extremely limited," the White House said Monday.Papadopoulos was seated at the table with President Trump and Attorney General Jeff Sessions during a March 31 meeting with the president's national security team.During a visit to the Washington Post headquarters in March of last year, Trump revealed the names of his foreign policy team and mentioned Papadopoulos as an "excellent guy."White House press secretary Sanders said Monday that Trump was being nothing more than "complimentary on behalf of the campaign" at the time.Trump has also argued that the focus on Mueller's investigation should be on the Democrats and his 2016 opponent, Hillary Clinton. Along with Papadopoulos' guilty plea, Trump's campaign manager Paul Manafort and Trump's deputy campaign manager Rick Gates were indicted on 12 counts including money laundering and failing to disclose their work as foreign agents. They pleaded not guilty."As Paul [Manafort's] lawyer said, there was 'no collusion' and events mentioned took place long before he came to the campaign," Trump tweeted.The indictment released by the special counsel Monday alleges that Manafort acted as an unregistered agent of the Ukranian government between 2006 and 2015. But Manafort was laundering Ukraine payments from 2006 through at least 2016 to hide it from the U.S. government, according to the document. Manafort joined the Trump campaign in March 2016.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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