• ABC News(WASHINGTON) -- President Donald Trump said Monday that he intends to declare North Korea a state sponsor of terror.This is a breaking news story. Please check back for updates.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
    Read more...
  • iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- Special Counsel Robert Mueller's team investigating whether President Donald Trump sought to obstruct a federal inquiry into connections between his presidential campaign and Russian operatives has now directed the Justice Department to turn over a broad array of documents, ABC News has learned.In particular, Mueller's investigators are keen to obtain emails related to the firing of FBI Director James Comey and the earlier decision of Attorney General Jeff Sessions to recuse himself from the entire matter, according to a source who has not seen the specific request but was told about it.Issued within the past month, the directive marks the special counsel's first records request to the Justice Department, and it means Mueller is now demanding documents from the department overseeing his investigation.Attorney General Jeff Sessions and Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein played key roles in Comey's removal. And Sessions has since faced withering criticism from Trump over his recusal and Rosenstein's subsequent appointment of Mueller.Mueller's investigators now seek not only communications between Justice Department officials themselves, but also any communications with White House counterparts, the source said. Before this request, investigators asked former senior Justice Department officials for information from their time at the department, ABC News was told.The latest move suggests the Special Counsel is still actively digging into, among other matters, whether Trump or any other administration official improperly tried to influence an ongoing investigation.Last month, Sessions told lawmakers he would cooperate with any requests from Mueller and is willing to meet with him."I want him to complete his investigation professionally," Sessions told the Senate Judiciary Committee.Trump, however, has openly expressed disdain for the federal probe, and since his days on the campaign trail he has questioned the U.S. intelligence community's unanimous conclusion that Russia tried to meddle in last year's presidential election.Shortly before firing Comey, Trump secretly drafted a memo laying out his reasons for wanting the FBI chief ousted. The New York Times described it as an "angry, meandering" missive.The draft memo was never publicly released, but a copy was shared with Rosenstein, who had taken command of the Russia-related probe, according to the Times.To publicly bolster Trump's decision on Comey, the White House released two memos written separately by Sessions and Rosenstein, with both faulting Comey for his handling of the FBI's probe into Hillary Clinton's use of a private email server.During a House hearing in June, Rosenstein refused to say whether he consulted with the White House ahead of Comey's firing or whether anyone asked him to write his memo, insisting such questions "may well be within the scope of the special counsel's investigation."Rosenstein still maintains final supervision over the case, even though he was interviewed by Mueller's team as a witness for his own role in Comey's firing.Meanwhile, Trump has taken aim at Sessions for the recusal, launching such biting personal attacks months ago that it appeared as though Sessions possibly would not last the summer as attorney general.At one point, Trump told reporters he wouldn't have nominated Sessions to run the Justice Department had he known the attorney general was going to give up oversight authority of the long-running investigation.In July, Trump posted a Tweet demanding to know why "our beleaguered" attorney general wasn't "looking into Crooked Hillarys crimes & Russia relations."In announcing his recusal four months earlier, Sessions said he and "senior career department officials" spent "several weeks" discussing whether his role as top foreign policy adviser to Trump's presidential campaign last year meant his "impartiality might reasonably be questioned."His work leading the campaign's foreign policy team
    Read more...
  • ABC News(WASHINGTON) -- A key moderate Senate Republican said the Senate’s tax bill needs revisions before it is put to a vote.
    Read more...
  • ABC News(WASHINGTON)-- Carly Fiorina, a former CEO of Hewlett Packard who ran for the Republican nomination for president in 2016, said the current wave of sexual harassment allegations from Hollywood to Capitol Hill "will only be a watershed moment if men decide to step forward."
    Read more...
  • ABC News(WASHINGTON) -- Republican Sen. Susan Collins said sexual misconduct allegations against President Donald Trump that surfaced during the 2016 campaign "remain very disturbing."
    Read more...
  • Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- Sen. Jeff Flake, a frequent sparring partner of President Donald Trump, continues to make enemies in his own party after calling the GOP "toast" while unaware he was still on a live mic.
    Read more...