• Don Juan Moore/ESPN Images(MIAMI) -- After seven seasons with the Houston Texans, Arian Foster is changing gears and heading to Florida.The 29-year-old running back signed a free agent contract with the Miami Dolphins on Monday.
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  • Jared C. Tilton/Getty Images(LOUDON, N.H.) — Matt Kenseth’s No. 20 Toyota failed a post-race inspection following his victory in the New Hampshire 301 at New Hampshire Motor Speedway on Sunday.The Joe Gibbs Racing driver’s car failed inspection in the laser inspection station and will undergo further evaluation at the NASCAR Research & Development Center in Concord, North Carolina, NASCAR.com reports.Any penalties forthcoming would likely be announced in the middle of the week.Kenseth finished ahead of Tony Stewart and Joey Logano in Sunday’s race. It was his second Sprint Cup victory of the year.Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Here are the latest scores and winners: INTERLEAGUEColorado 7, Tampa Bay 4AMERICAN LEAGUEKansas City 7, Cleveland 3 L.A. Angels 9, Texas 5  Oakland 7, Houston 4Seattle 4, Chi White Sox 3N-Y Yankees 2, Baltimore 1Detroit 1, Minnesota 0NATIONAL LEAGUESt. Louis 10, San Diego 2 Miami 3, Philadelphia 2, 11 InningsChi Cubs 5, N-Y Mets 1Cincinnati 8, Atlanta 2Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(HOUSTON) -- A former St. Louis Cardinals official has been sentenced to jail for hacking the Houston Astros' computers.
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  • Steve Marcus/Getty Images(PHOENIX) -- UFC star Jon Jones' temporary suspension has been extended by the Nevada State Athletic Commission.
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  • Stockbyte/Thinkstock(MOSCOW) -- The World Anti-Doping Agency has recommended Monday that Russia be totally barred from this summer's Olympics in Rio de Janeiro after a damning new investigation by the body found the country directed a doping cover-up affecting virtually “all sports” in the country.Russia’s track and field athletes are already banned from competing in Rio after a WADA investigation in November found a cover-up of systemic doping among them. The new WADA investigation found that doping affected almost every sport, not just track and field, and provided fresh evidence it was controlled directly by the Russian state.The investigation was presented in Toronto Monday by the man who oversaw it, Richard McLaren, a Canadian lawyer commissioned by WADA to examine spectacular claims made in May to The New York Times of a cover up at the 2014 Sochi Winter Olympics. McLaren's report largely upheld the claims made to The New York Times by Grigory Rodchenkov, the former head of Russia's anti-doping laboratory, but also described in far greater detail how the system had been controlled directly by Russia's ministry of sport and aided by its F.S.B. security service.Speaking at a news conference, McLaren said Russia had created a “state-directed” system that “allowed cheating Russian athletes to compete while using performance enhancing drugs” and that this affected “all sports."Following the report's release, WADA released a list of recommendations that included that the International Olympic Committee and Paralympic Committee "decline entries, for Rio 2016, of all athletes submitted by the Russian Olympic Committee (ROC) and the Russian Paralympic Committee." The list also recommends Russian officials be barred from attending the Olympics.Russian President Vladimir Putin called the WADA report Monday a “dangerous relapse into political interference in sport” that could lead to the splitting of the Olympic movement.Coming just weeks before the Olympics, Russia now faces a whole-sale ban of its athletes from the summer games. Ahead of the report, 10 national anti-doping bodies, including those of the U.S., Germany and Japan, had called for Russia to be barred if the report was damning. WADA does not have the power to bar Russia, but international sports bodies are bound to take its recommendations into account.In a statement immediately after the report’s release, the IOC said “the report shows a shocking and unprecedented attack on the integrity of sport and on the Olympic Games” and that the IOC would “not hesitate to take the toughest sanctions available” against those implicated in it. The IOC is due to convene a conference call on Tuesday, which is expected to discuss the issue.Russia has repeatedly denied that it has a state doping program. But McLaren's report, which he said was supported by forensic and documentary evidence, as well as testimonies, describes Russian state involvement in the cover-up in greater detail than WADA's previous reports.As described by Monday's report, the system allegedly hinged on Russia’s anti-doping laboratory in Moscow, where Rodchenkov had been director. According to McLaren, every positive sample was sent to Russia’s sports ministry for it to decide which samples should be covered up. An order would then be sent back down to the lab, ordering it to conceal certain results, which it would do by entering false information into the Russian and WADA’s own anti-doping database.According to the report, the orders to cover up were particularly frequent around international competitions hosted by Russia and the Olympics, taking in all the major athletics events hosted by the country since 2011.“The State implemented a simple failsafe strategy,” McLaren said in the report. “If all the operational precautions to promote and permit doping by Russian athletes proved to have b
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