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  • Bruce Bennett/Getty Images(PYEONGCHANG, South Korea) -- A Slovenian hockey player has been expelled from the Olympic Games after allegedly testing positive for a banned substance, the international Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) said Tuesday.Ziga Jeglic, who played on the Slovenian team that beat Team USA last week, was tested on match day, according to Team Slovenia press officer Brane Dmitrovic.He was told to leave Pyeongchang, South Korea, Tuesday within 24 hours, the CAS said in a statement. Jeglic is the third athlete in the Winter Games who has been accused of doping.CAS, the Switzerland-based body that reviews the evidence in such cases, said it has started an investigation.Kei Saito, a Japanese short-track speed skater, was sent home after allegedly testing positive last week for acetazolamide, a diuretic and masking agent.Russian Aleksandr Krushelnitckii, the bronze medalist in mixed pairs curling, allegedly had meldonium in his blood samples and has also left the games.Meldonium appears to work by inhibiting the synthesis of a substance called carnitine, which the cells in the body need to burn fat to produce energy. The Russians argue that it wouldn’t help them.Published studies say meldonium may be effective in treating heart ailments, strokes, diabetes and Alzheimer’s disease, as well as in improving people’s moods. But some experts said the evidence for such claims was scant and that it was not even clear whether the drug improves athletic performance.Krushelnitsky, in a statement published on the Russian Curling Federation’s website, said he has never used any banned substances in his career."I can declare openly that never have I used banned substances or resorted to any other unsportsmanlike methods over the time I have been in sport," Krushelnitsky wrote.The Russian National Committee is banned from the Pyeongchang games because of widespread, systematic doping during the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics. Only athletes who were viewed to have not participated in any doping scheme were invited to attend these Olympics after careful vetting.They participate under a neutral banner, the Olympic Athletes from Russia (OAR). If Krushnelnitckii is found to have purposefully taken the drug to enhance his performance, it could jeopardize Russia’s efforts to be reinstated into the Olympic family.The Russian Olympic Committee (ROC) today said it will launch a comprehensive investigation into the incident to establish the details. “The concentration of meldonium found in the sample indicates that it was a single dose of the drug, which is not used for medical purposes, and it is absolutely meaningless from the point of view of achieving any therapeutic effect on the human body,” the ROC said in a statement.Krushelnitckii, who trained in Japan before arriving in South Korea for the competition, has reportedly told officials that somebody must have laced his food or drink with the banned substance. Meldonium has been a banned substance for athletes in competitions since 2016.The International Olympic Committee (IOC) has declined to comment on the ongoing investigation until it is complete, but said the new strict procedures will catch violators.“It is always disappointing when these things happen, but it shows the systems are working here,” IOC spokesman Mark Adams said. The Russian Curling Federation is fully backing its curler’s claim of innocence and rallying to show support for the OAR curling squad."Today, practically all members of the Russian Curling Federation are flying to Pyeongchang to attend the CAS session,” Dmitry Svishchev, President of the Russia Curling Federation, told Russian news agency TASS. “We cannot leave these guys all alone in this situation." CAS has indicated it will release its ruling on Krushelnitckii by Thursday. The Olympic closing ceremonies will take place Sunday when the Russian athletes hope they will be allowed to ma
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  • (PYEONGCHANG, South Korea) -- Now that snowboarder Chloe Kim has won a gold medal at the U.S. 2018 Olympics, the 17-year-old Californian would like to go back to just being a normal teenager."I will try to go to prom, find me a boy," she told ABC News' Amy Robach.Kim, who won the halfpipe snowboarding competition in Pyeongchang, South Korea, earlier this week, has already sacrificed many events in her young life."I missed out on a few proms, homecomings, might miss my graduation," she said, adding that she'd do it all over again if she could. "I wouldn’t want it any other way...it’s worth it."Kim described to Robach the thrill of competing at the Olympics."I think the scariest part is learning a new trick and the first runs, I was pretty nervous my first run but after that, I was like, 'Eh,'" Kim said."I think the cool thing about snowboarding is that everyone has their own style," she added.Kim also talked about the support of her family."I didn’t know my grandmother was going to be there...I think she was stoked," she said. "She was jumping up and down...she was so cute and I am glad she was able to watch."Kim was excited to share her win with her parents."I don’t think I made many sacrifices myself but my parents have," Kim said. "If anything, I feel like they’ve given up so much for me and this is [the] least I could do, ‘Look, guys, I made it!'"Kim’s parents emigrated from South Korea to California in the 1980s. As a Korean American competing in Pyeongchang, Kim had fans not only from the U.S. but fans from South Korea as well who embraced Kim as their own.When asked what makes South Korea special, Kim said: “Everyone is super down with like anything here. Like every cool trend is here."Back home, Kim loves Beyonce, Kpop, shopping, potato chips and binge watches "Riverdale." She also has a celebrity crush on “Riverdale” actor KJ Apa.Her guilty pleasure is sweets, and she can't go anywhere with her lip balm.Kim also enjoys changing her hair color. When she was 13 years old, Kim made a bet with her mom that if she made podium at her contest, she could dye her hair.Kim earned third place and got her wish. Since then, she has changed her hair color from pink, purple, blue and now blonde hair."I told my mom I wanted to do silver and she said 'No,'" she said.Now Kim wants to go back and spend time with her dog."I want to go home because my dog is at home and I’d do anything for my dog," she said.And Kim also wants to catch up on some much-needed rest."I think and it will be nice just chill a little bit," Kim said. "I’m probably going to be hibernating for however many days in my room sleeping. Wake up to eat, go back to sleep. That sounds very nice."
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  • Amin Mohammad Jamali/Getty Images(PYEONGCHANG) -- North Korea finished 13th in pair skating at the Winter Olympics as each competitor achieved a personal-best score.Ryom Tae Ok, 19, and Kim Ju Sik, 26, scored 124.23 points on Thursday in the free stake after gaining 69.40 points in the short program Wednesday for a total of 193.63.North Korean spectators and cheerleaders loudly applauded for the pair as they skated to the French-Canadian song "Je ne suis qu’une chanson" (“I am a song”) during their performance at Gangneung Ice Arena.Ryom and Kim's coaches, Bruno Marcotte of Canada and Kim Hyong Son of North Korea, emotionally hugged each other while waiting for scores to post from the routine. The skaters appeared disappointed with their marks."We feel somewhat disappointed because in our training we did a whole lot better than the results we got here," Kim said in an interview with South Korean TV station SBS. "We will try our best to improve our score in our next performance. We want to break our record, step by step, and hope to get better and better."His partner agreed."I feel the same," she said, looking away from the camera. When asked about her next goal, she said, "I will tell you after I reach that goal. Right now, I have nothing to say."Ryom said hearing the crowd's enthusiastic support for her and Kim was inspiring."At the start of the competition we were very nervous," she said. "But as we heard the crowd cheering we were very happy, and the hardship just melted away and I felt better. I was very happy."Kim, who has skated with Ryom since 2015, also told reporters that they "are proud to have participated" in an Olympics that celebrated both nations."We would like to send our thanks to the South Koreans and our fellow Koreans for cheering us on," he said. "We were happy to perform here."Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • Gene Sweeney Jr./Getty Images(PHOENIX) -- Utah Jazz guard Donovan Mitchell made a pair of powerful statements Wednesday about the shooting rampage at a Florida high school that left 17 dead: "Pray for Parkland" and "End Gun Violence."But the rookie player didn't tweet those words, nor did he issue a statement through his press representative: Instead, with a black magic marker in hand, he jotted down those messages on the side of his shoes.Following the game -- Utah Jazz beat the Phoenix Suns 107-97 -- Mitchell explained why school shootings struck a nerve with him."My mom's a schoolteacher," the Connecticut native, 21, told reporters. "I was about 15, 20 minutes away during the Sandy Hook shooting. It's kind of scary. I'm not saying all shootings make me feel the same way, but especially school shootings, with my mom being a nursery teacher, it's kind of scary that that could happen at any moment, anywhere."Mitchell continued, "And that’s kind of one of the things that hit home with me, and why I came in here early. I saw a Snapchat video of a kid screaming. And I just sat there for 5 minutes just thinking about it. My prayers go out to all those families. It's tough. It's crazy."Mitchell took the opportunity to speak out about gun control legislation."We definitely have to do something about it," he said. "A lot of people, we talk about it, and there's a lot of so-called awareness of it, but there's nothing being done. I looked something up, and the same gun that was used in Vegas, Orlando, Sandy Hook, and I'm missing more. It's interesting how it just continues to happen, and the movement doesn't do much."Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • Andreas Rentz/Getty Images(PYEONGCHANG) -- Chris Mazdzer made history at the 2018 Winter Olympics by becoming the first from the U.S. to medal in men's singles luge -- and his raucous cheering section has become almost as famous."When I came out and saw the second-place, something you have dreamed about your entire life, I wanted to celebrate with family and friends," he said at a press conference after his medal-winning run in Pyeongchang, South Korea.Mazdzer’s girlfriend Mara Marian and sisters, Kate and Sara, loudly cheered Mazdzer on while wearing U.S.-themed sports bras despite the frigid conditions. Photos of the women went viral."The protocol," Mazdzer explained, "is to get off the track to the left, but I got off to the right. I just wanted to be there with them. It takes a lot for them to come here and support me."Mazdzer told ABC News' Amy Robach that if he were in a similar situation as his fans, he "would have done the same exact thing.""It was really cool to look up and honestly know that most of the crowd was there for me," he said."The goal was to medal," he added, "and I really didn’t care what color it was."The 29-year-old Mazdzer also competed in Sochi and in Vancouver, but didn't win any medals.In luge, competitors can reach speeds close to 90 mph and many runs have a vertical drop of about 30 stories. But it's still an event that requires more psychological preparation than physical, he said.Luge is a "mental, emotional roller coaster," Mazdzer added."Forget the bruises, they go away -- the ice burns, straining muscles, soreness -- that's easy," he said. "Physical stuff, I can do. Mental stuff is the hardest."When Mazdzer recently went through a slump in training, he unexpectedly received a boost from a friendly rival."This goes against every Russian-U.S.A. stereotype ever," Mazdzer explained, "but one of the Russian athletes actually wanted me to use his sled because he didn't think he would come to the Olympics, and he wanted to know what it could do. That friendship and trust was really moving."Mazdzer declined to name the man who offered to help him."If you have the fastest equipment, why would you give it to anyone else?" said Mazdzer, who used the sled for a run in Latvia but ultimately decided he was too big for it."I developed such strong relationships with people," he continued. "We travel together for months on end, known them since we were 13, so you build a strong relationship. You have the human side and the luge side."
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