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  • ABC News(PYEONGCHANG, South Korea) -- And the jabs at Vice President Mike Pence keep coming.U.S. Olympic skier Gus Kenworthy took aim at Mike Pence again Thursday night, joking that he's unable to shake the vice president's hand because of a thumb injury."Broke my thumb yesterday in practice," Kenworthy tweeted, along with an X-ray of his thumb. "It won't stop me from competing (obvi) but it does prevent me from shaking Pence's hand so... Silver linings! Will be giving my teammates (and literally everyone else) an enthusiastic 'thumbs up!' of encouragement the rest of the trip."A Twitter user blasted Kenworthy, tweeting at him, "Your obsession with Pence is creepy."But Kenworthy, unlike fellow openly gay U.S. Olympian Adam Rippon, hasn't publicly criticized Pence too much."This was literally my first tweet ever that mentioned him," Kenworthy shot back in a tweet. While Kenworthy, 26, may not have previously taken to Twitter to express disdain for Pence, he did tell Ellen DeGeneres during an appearance earlier this month on her show that “to have someone leading the delegation that's directly attacked the LGBT community” seems like a “bad fit.” “I feel like the Olympics is all about inclusion and people coming together, and it seems like it's not really doing that,” he said.And during an interview with USA Today last month, Rippon said of Pence's involvement with the Olympics, "You mean Mike Pence, the same Mike Pence that funded gay conversion therapy?” Rippon said. "I’m not buying it."Kenworthy and Rippon's distaste for the vice president stems over the former Indiana governor's record on same-sex marriage, LGBT rights in the workplace and the widespread notion that he once supported so-called gay conversion therapy.In a 2000 statement on his congressional campaign website, Pence said, "Resources should be directed toward those institutions which provide assistance to those seeking to change their sexual behavior." During the 2016 election campaign, however, Pence's spokesman said he does not support the concept.Kenworthy and Rippon are the first openly gay U.S. Winter Olympians to compete in the games.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Here are the scores from Thursday's sports events:NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATIONDenver 134, Milwaukee 123Minnesota 119, L.A. Lakers 111NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUEPittsburgh 3, L.A. Kings 1N.Y. Islanders 3, N.Y. Rangers 0New Jersey 5, Carolina 2Tampa Bay 4, Detroit 1Ottawa 3, Buffalo 2Calgary 4, Nashville 3Washington 5, Minnesota 2Anaheim 3, Chicago 2Arizona 5, Montreal 2Vegas 4, Edmonton 1San Jose 4, Vancouver 1TOP 25 COLLEGE BASKETBALLHouston 67, (5) Cincinnati 62Wisconsin 57, (6) Purdue 53Penn St. 79, (8) Ohio St. 56(9) Gonzaga 76, Loyola Marymount 46San Francisco 70, (15) Saint Mary's (Cal) 63(17) Arizona 77, (25) Arizona St. 70(19) Wichita St. 93, Temple 86Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • Ian MacNicol/Getty Images(PYEONGCHANG, South Korea) -- Olympic gold medalist Shaun White apologized on Wednesday for referring to sexual misconduct allegations against him as “gossip.”“It was a poor choice of words to describe such a sensitive subject in the world today,” White told NBC’s Today show later. “And, you know, I'm just truly sorry. And I was so overwhelmed with just wanting to talk about how amazing today was and share my experience.”The Olympic snowboarder had earlier deflected questions by ABC News about a sexual misconduct lawsuit after his winning performance Wednesday in South Korea, where he offered the "gossip" explanation and tried to move on from follow-up questions during a news conference.White, 31, won his third gold medal Wednesday morning in Pyeongchang -- adding to the medals he won in 2006 in Italy and 2010 in Canada.His former Bad Things bandmate Lena Zawaideh sued White in April 2016, asking for what she said was unpaid salary after he allegedly fired her from the group that he started.Zawaideh later added claims of sexual harassment to her suit, according to ESPN, saying White forced her to watch pornography and sent her text messages asking her to wear more provocative clothing. White reportedly reached an unspecified settlement with Zawaideh last year."Honestly, I'm here to talk about the Olympics -- not, you know, not gossip," White told ABC News’ Matt Gutman before his apology. "I am who I am, and I’m proud of who I am. And my friends love me and vouch for me, and I think that stands on its own."When asked by Gutman at Wednesday's news conference about the allegations affecting his legacy, White said, "I don't think so."U.S. Snowboarding and Freeskiing spokesman Nick Alexakos then tried to turn the news conference back to the discussion of White's performance."I think we’re here to talk about the gold medal and the amazing day we had today," Alexakos said. Gutman attempted to follow up, but White interrupted to say, "I feel like I addressed it."USA Today columnist and ABC News commentator Christine Brennan noted that Alexakos took no questions from any female journalists."I understand that he would rather not talk about this, but I don't know that he gets to make that call,” Brennan told ABC News. "This 'Me Too' movement is a very significant, important part of American culture right now, and he now is in it.”Zawaideh's lawyer, Lawrance Bohm, did not respond to ABC News’ request for comment. White’s lawyers have always denied the allegations.White is one of the most popular so-called alternative-sports athletes in the world. His net worth is estimated at between $20 million and $40 million, according to Money magazine, and he has endorsement deals from AT&T, Burton snowboards and GoPro cameras.His Olympic snowboarding career may be over, but White said he plans to compete in skateboarding when the sport makes its debut at the 2020 Summer Olympics in Tokyo.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • Jean Catuffe/Getty Images(PYEONGCHANG, South Korea) -- Being gay and having disdain for Mike Pence -- those are two things that have been central to a lot of the coverage of U.S. Olympic figure skater Adam Rippon while he competes at the Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, South Korea.After all, the Scranton, Pennsylvania, native has been outspoken about the vice president's record on LGBT issues while he was the governor of Indiana. Rippon and skier Gus Kenworthy are the first openly gay U.S. athletes to compete at the Winter Olympics.But for Rippon, 28, it's being a role model for LGBT youth back home that's important to him -- not making his time at the games about a lawmaker he vehemently opposes."I have no problem talking about what I've said because I stand by it, but I think right now the Olympics are about Olympic competition and the athletes involved," Rippon, who won a bronze Sunday, said at a press conference Tuesday. "I don't want it to distract from them, and I don't want my Olympic experience to be about Mike Pence. I want it to be about my amazing skating and being America's sweetheart."The Rippon-Pence saga kicked off last month when Rippon told USA Today of the vice president's involvement with the Olympics, "You mean Mike Pence, the same Mike Pence that funded gay conversion therapy? I’m not buying it."In a 2000 statement on his congressional campaign website, Pence said, "Resources should be directed toward those institutions which provide assistance to those seeking to change their sexual behavior." During the 2016 election campaign, however, Pence's spokesman said he does not support the concept.Rippon further told USA Today, "If it were before my event, I would absolutely not go out of my way to meet somebody who I felt has gone out of their way to not only show that they aren’t a friend of a gay person, but that they think that they’re sick. I wouldn’t go out of my way to meet somebody like that."Then last week, as reports circulated that there was tension between the pair, Pence took to Twitter, and wrote, "@Adaripp I want you to know we are FOR YOU. Don’t let fake news distract you. I am proud of you and ALL OF OUR GREAT athletes and my only hope for you and all of #TeamUSA is to bring home the gold. Go get 'em!"While Rippon downplayed at the press conference the chatter about him and Pence, he instead elaborated on being a role model for youth."I worked really hard to get where I am," Rippon said. "And I didn't get to where I am for being gay or speaking out on different issues. I got to where I am for working really hard. I think that me using my voice has given my skating a greater purpose of more than just something that I enjoy to do. It's given me a voice to reach to young kids."Rippon continued, "I've gotten so many messages. I could even get emotional thinking about it. I've gotten so many messages from young kids all over the country -- that my story has resonated with them, and it's incredibly powerful that this platform that you can have at the Olympic games.And Rippon, who is based in Los Angeles, has no plans to quiet down."I heard a lot of people, say 'Adam Rippon should tone it down' and blah, blah, blah. I can't tone it down. I'm being me and being myself," he said, adding, "And I would be doing myself an injustice and an injustice to those kids who didn't think they could be themselves."
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  • Chris Graythen/Getty Images(PYEONGCHANG, South Korea) -- In Adam Rippon's Olympic debut in Pyeongchang, he helped his team seize a bronze medal in figure skating.But the 28-year-old said he almost vomited before heading out on the ice."I could feel the pressure. I was really nervous, to be honest," Rippon said. ABC News' Matt Gutman spoke with the medal-winner and his mother, Kelly Rippon, a single mother of six who traveled to Korea to support her son."It's a great day. I am very proud," Kelly Rippon said. "It's just so impressive to be able to keep the focus in that kind of pressure."After skating, Adam Rippon said he felt "great and amazing," but also "ready for lunch and a good nap."He added, "I have a brother and sister here. I am really glad that my sister got to see me skate in a competition for the first time."Adam Rippon's path to Pyeongchang was a long one, his mother said."I remember saying to him that night he missed qualifying for the '14 Olympics: The only thing that is life and death, is life and death. You've got to believe something better is waiting for you," Kelly Rippon said. "And then he was just like, 'Uh-huh,' but he took that. And over the past year, when he broke his foot, I was sobbing when he said, 'Mom, you've got to believe that this has happened for something better to come in the future.' And when he said that, I just knew he would be here and something like this would happen."Teammate Mirai Nagasu, who also failed to qualify for the 2014 games, consoled each other while eating In-N-Out burgers. But, four years later, each qualified -- and they're now roommates at the Olympic Village."I can't believe everything that we have been through," Adam Rippon said. "Especially Mirai and I off the ice, that we are here together and we have these two incredible performances together. I mean, Mirai was unbelievable. I was trying to keep it together -- I was crying throughout her entire performance."Adam Rippon also made headlines as the first openly gay U.S. athlete to compete in the Winter Olympics."As far as him formally coming out to me," Kelly Rippon said, "we were walking into a show and he said to me -- this was when he was in his 20s -- 'Mom, I just want you to know that I am gay,' and I said I appreciate you telling me that formally.”Gutman asked Kelly Rippon what she thought of the controversy between her son and Vice President Mike Pence, who attended the games."I thought it was poor timing," she said. "I was disappointed as a citizen of this country. I thought it was completely unnecessary, and I thought he was kind of taunting him. I am glad Adam did not respond to him."Pence's office contacted Adam Rippon's agent and asked to have a conversation or some kind of meeting, which the skater declined at this time so he could focus on training, competing and supporting his teammates, Kelly Rippon said."'No' is not never," she added. "He said, 'Not now -- I'm at the Olympics, for heaven's sake.'"
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