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  • Phil Ellsworth / ESPN Images(LOS ANGELES) -- LeBron James says he didn't know who Laura Ingraham was until she started an NBA-like trash-talking feud with him on her Fox News show by telling him "shut up and dribble" in response to his bashing of President Trump.But the 33-year-old Cleveland Cavaliers star said Ingraham couldn't have picked a better time than NBA All-Star weekend to launch her attempt to silence his social commentary."I get to sit up here and talk about social injustice, equality and why a woman on a certain network decided to tell me to 'shut up and dribble,'" James said at a news conference ahead of Sunday night's NBA All-Star game in Los Angeles. "So, thank you, whatever her name is. I don't even know her name."On Sunday, the 54-year-old conservative host of "The Ingraham Angle" defended her on-air comments about James, in which she slammed his "barely intelligible, not to mention ungrammatical take on President Trump" in a podcast. She said people who described her comments as racists in an avalanche of social media posts took them wrong."In 2003, I wrote a New York Times bestseller called 'Shut Up & Sing,' in which I criticized celebrities like the Dixie Chicks & Barbra Streisand who were trashing then-President George W. Bush. I have used a variation of that title for more than 15 years to respond to performers who sound off on politics. I’ve told Robert DeNiro to 'Shut Up & Act,' Jimmy Kimmel to 'Shut Up & Make Us Laugh,' and just this week told the San Antonio Spurs’ Gregg Popovich to 'Shut up & Coach,'" she said in a statement to ABC News."If pro athletes and entertainers want to freelance as political pundits, then they should not be surprised when they’re called out for insulting politicians. There was no racial intent in my remarks -- false, defamatory charges of racism are a transparent attempt to immunize entertainment and sports elites from scrutiny and criticism."Ingraham's brouhaha with James started Thursday night when she aired part of a segment from the podcast "Uninterrupted," hosted by ESPN's Cari Champion, in which James and fellow NBA star Kevin Durant talked basketball and social issues while riding in an Uber."I feel like our team, as a country, is not ran by a great coach," Durant tells James in the piece.James responds: "It's not even a surprise when he (Trump) says something. It's laughable and it's scary."Referring to Trump, Champion added: "I shouldn't be numb to your racist comments. I shouldn't be numb to your behavior."When the camera cut back to her, Ingraham said, "I'm numb to this commentary" before slamming James, specifically."Must they run their mouth like that?" she said. "Unfortunately, a lot of kids, and some adults, take these ignorant comments seriously."Look, there might be a cautionary lesson in LeBron for kids," she continued. "This is what happens when you attempt to leave high school a year early to join the NBA. And it's always unwise to seek political advice from someone who gets paid a hundred-million-dollars a year to bounce a ball. Oh, and LeBron and Kevin, you're great players, but no one voted for you. Millions elected Trump to be their coach. So keep the political commentary to yourself or as someone once said, shut up and dribble."During his news conference Saturday with reporters from around the world, James said, "We will definitely not shut up and dribble. I will definitely not do that.""I also wish she did a little bit more fact checking because I actually did finish high school and didn't leave early. I graduated high school," James said. "You know, to be an African-American kid and grow up in the inner city with a single-parent mother and not being financially stable, and to make it to where I've made it today, I think I've defeated the odds and I want every kid to know that and everybody to know that the youth, they can do it as well."Pointing to his two young sons sitting near him, James said he feels an ob
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  • Clive Rose/Getty Images(PYEONGCHANG, South Korea) -- Shaun White is a three-time Olympic champion.
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  • Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images(PYEONGCHANG, South Korea) -- Champion freestyle ski prodigy Torin Yater-Wallace has always faced adversity head-on and uses setbacks as catalysts for growth and future goals -- including, he hopes, an Olympic gold medal in Pyeongchang, South Korea.The 22-year-old Aspen, Colorado, native sat down with ABC News to discuss his long hard-fought journey to the 2018 Winter Olympic Games.Yater-Wallace is familiar with bending over backward and taking leaps of faith to succeed as a freestyle skier in halfpipe, but when family struggles and a life-threatening liver infection came into play, he had to face the unexpected hurdles head-on.He recently shared his story about battling from the brink of death to his place atop the X-Games podium in “Back to Life,” a documentary produced by Red Bull.“It was honestly more just wanting to tell a story that happens to be real life,” Yater-Wallace told Watt about his reasoning for doing the documentary. “It was also just a window to look into the life of a professional athlete. ... You see what they do on TV and see them winning all these medals and you know life looks perfect and beautiful. But ultimately you don't know anything about it,” he said.“Skiing is what saved my life and it was my getaway as a kid,” Yater-Wallace said of his challenges early in life. At just 12 years old, his father was arrested, indicted and convicted of fraud and sent to prison. “The feds just took my dad from my sister and I and my mom and it was emotional and it was a hard time to go through as a kid,” he explained.But he turned to skiing to help him through that difficult time and quickly rose to the top of the competition. “It happened, it sucks, but you really just have to adapt to an older version of yourself at a young age.”Yater-Wallace has racked up an impressive list of accolades, including eight X-Games medals, starting with a silver medal in 2011 when he was just 15.The young skiing phenom fought back from a collapsed lung in 2014 to qualify for his first Olympics in Sochi and had more family struggles waiting at home.“I dealt with [a] pretty severe injury leading into Sochi and had only skied 10 days that year after collapsing my lung twice and breaking my ribs,” he said.“My mom got diagnosed with cancer when I was going into the Olympic qualifying process for Sochi ... She was in and out of the hospital just in a horrible state,” Yater-Wallace added.“It was always just that thought of why me,” he said of the setbacks.Less than a year later, he fell ill during a ski run in Utah and was airlifted to a nearby hospital where he was diagnosed with a deadly liver infection that hospitalized him for 20 days.“Before I knew it, I was being flown to a hospital in Salt Lake [City] and was in a medically induced paralysis, in a sedated state and had an infection that took over my liver,” he said. “My gallbladder caused a massive abscess on my vital organs [and they] were shutting down.”Yater-Wallace bounced back from his illness and once he was cleared to ski, he went on to compete and won gold at the X-Games in Oslo. “That was special. It was really cool,” he said.With his health back on track, Yater-Wallace is competing in his second Olympics and this time his family will be by his side."In my eyes, he was still my hero and still the person that I looked up to," he said of his father who served his time in prison. "And nothing has changed till this day. I still love my dad to death."Even with his family's support, he said the competition will be stiff in South Korea.“The standard is unprecedented it's insane,” he said of the scoring adding that even the slightest mistake can dash his chances. “I almost will just give up on the run and ski down because I just know it's not going to score high and that's just how competitive the
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  • Ron Vesely/MLB Photos via Getty Images(SAN DIEGO) -- Two-time MLB All-Star pitcher Esteban Loaiza was arrested last week after San Diego County sheriffs allegedly caught him with half a million dollars in cocaine.Loaiza, who pitched in the majors for 14 years, most prominently with the Chicago White Sox, was pulled over for a minor traffic violation while under surveillance for an ongoing narcotics investigation on Feb. 9, according to the San Diego County Sheriff's Department.A search of Loaiza's vehicle revealed "a sophisticated aftermarket compartment used to conceal contraband," the sheriff's department said. No drugs were actually found in the car, but the search led detectives to to investigate his home near San Diego.A search warrant was issued for Loaiza's home in Imperial Beach, California, where investigators found over 44 pounds of cocaine. Authorities estimated the drugs had a street value of about $500,000.San Diego Sheriff's Department Lt. Jason Vickery told ABC News the drugs were found in Loaiza's garage hidden in duffel bags and were packaged in a way that they appeared to have been transported from Mexico to the U.S. for distribution throughout the country.He has been booked on possession of over 20 kilograms of cocaine, possession of cocaine for sale and transportation of cocaine. Bail was set at $200,000.Loaiza, 47, pitched for eight teams in his lengthy MLB career and finished with a record of 126-114. He went to the All-Star Game in 2003 and 2004 with the White Sox and finished second in Cy Young Award voting in 2003.The pitcher made over $43 million in his career, according to Baseball Reference.
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  • Steve Russell/Toronto Star via Getty Images(PYEONGCHANG, South Korea) -- Mirai Nagasu, 24, sailed through the air with a 3-rotation jump at the Winter Games in Pyeongchang to become the first American woman to land the high-risk triple axel during an Olympic competition.Just 21 seconds into her routine in women's free skate at the team competition, Nagasu pulled off the rare feat that made her not only the first American woman but the third woman ever to land a triple axel at the Olympics, according to ESPN.Nagasu noted that the only two other women to achieve the feat in an Olympic competition were also of Japanese heritage."Midori Ito, Mao Asada and now Mirai Nagasu, all Japanese heritage," Nagasu said. "But I'm really fortunate that I'm American, so I'll be the first U.S. lady."Ito made the triple axel for the Japanese women's figure skating team during the 1992 Winter Olympic Games in Albertville, France, making her the first woman in Olympic history to land the jump. She won the silver medal in individual women's skating.Asada, also of Japan, won the silver medal after landing a triple axel during her routine in the 2010 Vancouver Olympics.“This is definitely history or herstory, whatever way you want to put it,” Nagasu said of her feat. “I wanted to make my teammates proud and I wanted to make America proud."“I knew in my heart this day would come,” she said.Nagasu was snubbed for a spot on the 2014 Olympic skating team and has spent the last four years training in hopes to qualify for this year's games.During her performance Monday, "I could see my teammates standing out of excitement," Nagasu said. "At that moment I wanted to stop the music and get off, but I still had my whole program ahead of me."Her coach, Tom Zakrajsek, took to Facebook to thank Nagasu, pointing out that she practiced her triple axel every day for the last four years.Former U.S. ice skating medalist Kristi Yamaguchi, who won gold during the 1992 Olympics, tweeted her congratulations after Nagasu’s historic performance with “tears of joy.”The U.S. ice skating team took home the bronze medal last night with the help of points awarded to Nagasu during her routine.Canada won the gold medal and Russia took home the silver.ESPN, like ABC News, is a division of the Walt Disney Company.
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