• ABC News(SAINT PAUL, Minn.) --  The woman whose boyfriend was fatally shot by a Minnesota police officer Wednesday night has spoken out about the tragedy.A grief-stricken Diamond Reynolds stood in front of the Minnesota governor’s residence in St. Paul this morning, where friends consoled her and a crowd of protesters surrounded her. Just hours after her video of the deadly altercation went viral on social media, Reynolds spoke out about the incident for the first time as a friend live-streamed the speech on Facebook.“The police did this,” Reynolds told the crowd, sobbing. “The police killed him in front of my daughter.”  Reynolds said she was driving with her boyfriend Philando Castile and her young daughter from the grocery store in Falcon Heights, a suburb of St. Paul, when police pulled them over for a busted tail light. An officer who came to the car window asked for Castile’s license and registration. At that point Castile notified the officer that he was carrying a gun, Reynolds said.“I begin to yell, ‘But he’s licensed to carry,’” she told the crowd. “After that, [the officer] begin to take off shots, bop bop bop bop, ‘Don’t move, don’t move!’”That’s when Reynolds took out her cellphone and started live-streaming on Facebook, she said. The video, which was briefly removed from Facebook but later republished with a warning of graphic content, appears to show Reynolds – sitting in a car with Castile, whose shirt appears soaked in blood – calmly saying an officer shot her boyfriend.At least one uniformed officer is seen pointing a gun through the driver’s side window at Castile, who appears lifeless in the car seat. The officer can be heard saying in the video, "I told him not to reach for it. I told him to get his hand out."  After shooting her boyfriend, Reynolds said the officer was crying and yelled, “F---, oh my God. I can’t believe it, I can’t believe it.”Reynolds continued to live-stream for several minutes, even as officers asked her to step out of the car and sit in the back of a police vehicle. She credited her calmness to her 4-year-old daughter.“My daughter was my lifeline,” she told the crowd outside the governor’s mansion. “My daughter told me to stay strong and that’s what I had to do. My daughter told me, ‘Don’t cry,’ and that’s what I had to do.”Reynolds said police detained her and her daughter at the police precinct in Falcon Heights until early this morning. She said the officers seized her cellphone and groceries from the car.“They separated my daughter from me. They didn’t feed us and they tried to place the blame like it was something we did,” she said. “I was not released until 5 o’clock this morning when I arrived at my house with two squad cars.”  Reynolds described Castile as a “very loving” and “sweet man,” who was not the father of her daughter but acted like one. She said he was hard-working and didn’t have a criminal history.“They took a part of my heart,” a visibly distressed Reynolds said. “He didn’t have any last words. His eyes rolled in the back of his head and he was dead instantly.”Castile was employed as a nutrition services supervisor at J.J. Hill Montessori Magnet School, according to the St. Paul Public Schools. He also worked at Arlington High School and Chelsea Heights Elementary School during his employment with the district, the school system said.The St. Anthony Police Department, which has jurisdiction over Falcon Heights, said in a statement earlier today that at 9 p.m. on Wednesday, "a St. Anthony police officer effected a traffic stop on Larpenteur and Fry in the City of Falcon Heights, Minnesota. During the stop, shots were fired. One adult male was t
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(SEALY, Texas) -- A 12-year-old girl was killed after an accident involving a truck caused a portion of a bridge in Sealy, Texas, to fall onto the sedan in which she was traveling.The victim was in the car with a female relative and another child. Austin County Judge Tim Lapham told ABC News the other child was extracted from the vehicle with no substantial wounds, but the female relative was airlifted with serious chest injuries.Lapham said the car was moving when debris from the bridge fell onto the vehicle after it was struck by an 18-wheeler disposal truck.“The truck [that hit the bridge] was not that big, but its hydraulic lift was up, which then struck the bridge,” said Lapham. “It was an accident. Simply operator error or [the driver] didn’t know the lift was up.”Lapham said that the bridge has been struck several times in the past and was closed for a short period of time as recently as last year. The state has slated it for replacement in 2017, according to Lapham.The Texas Department of Transportation says the intersection of Highway 36 and Highway 90 is still shut down following the incident.
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  • Courtesy San Diego Police Department (SAN DIEGO) -- Authorities in San Diego, California, are currently trying to catch a killer believed to be preying on the city's homeless population.The suspect, who has not been identified and remains at large, is believed to be responsible for four violent attacks in the city this past week, according to the San Diego Police Department (SDPD). The victims, all homeless people, were sleeping when they were targeted by the suspect, police said.In two of the incidents, the victims were "lit on fire," the SDPD said in a news release on Wednesday. The brutal attacks have left two dead and two others with life-threatening injuries. One of the survivors is not expected to live."These evil acts of violence are some of the worst that I’ve seen in my 34 years in law enforcement," San Diego Police Chief Shelley Zimmerman said at a news conference on Wednesday."This killer has targeted some of our community’s most vulnerable citizens while they are asleep," she added. "I want everyone to know that this series against our homeless is the highest priority for our police department."Investigators are offering a $1,000 reward for information leading to the arrest of the suspect, whom police believe was caught on a convenience store's security camera."There is no doubt in our minds that this person depicted on these photos and depicted on these videos is the person responsible," SDPD Capt. David Nieslit said at the news conference. "I cannot go into detail why we say that, but we’re quite confident this is the same person responsible for all."San Diego Mayor Kevin Faulconer called the attacks against the city's homeless "absolutely reprehensible.""SDPD is bringing all its resources to bear to find the person responsible and seek justice for the victims," he said in a statement on Twitter on Wednesday. "Police officers are also conducting extensive community outreach to provide information to homeless individuals to keep them safe."As the suspected killer is still on the loose, authorities said they have been urging local homeless people to remain vigilant, to avoid sleeping alone and to stay in open, well-lit areas.One homeless man in the city told ABC affiliate KGTV that he and his friends "came up with an idea of actually sleeping in shifts.""Every time I speak about it and every time I talk about it, it sends chills through my spine," the man, who wished not to be identified, said of the recent string of attacks.
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  • Mark Wallheiser/Getty Images(BATON ROUGE, La.) -- Community leaders in Baton Rouge, Louisiana are demanding a broad and thorough investigation into all aspects of the Alton Sterling case.Sterling, a black man, was shot and killed during an altercation with two white police officers in Baton Rouge this week. An investigation into the incident will be led by the U.S. Department of Justice Civil Rights Division."Together Baton Rouge" leaders gathered at the Wesley United Methodist Church Thursday morning, calling on the Department of Justice to expand its investigation beyond civil rights and to consider the possibility of any state or local law violations.The local leaders also urged residents of the community to continue their protests.Demonstrations have been taking place outside the Baton Rouge convenience store where Sterling was shot. One man was seen holding a sign that read: "Honk for justice."The demonstrations have spread beyond Baton Rouge. In Philadelphia, crowds gathered in the streets to protest Sterling's death. Twelve demonstrators were taken into custody there after they blocked a roadway, according to ABC station WPVI-TV in Philadelphia.Baton Rouge police said the incident began early Tuesday morning when uniformed officers responded to a disturbance call from someone who said a black man who was selling CDs and threatening him with a gun.Officers approached Sterling in the parking lot of the convenience store and "an altercation between Sterling and the officers ensued," police said. Sterling was shot during the altercation and died at the scene, police said.When graphic video of the shooting circulated online, crowds gathered in Baton Rouge to protest, and #AltonSterling was the No. 1 hashtag in the U.S. on Twitter.The two officers involved were placed on leave, police said.According to East Baton Rouge Parish District Attorney Hillar Moore III, the officers "indicated that they feared for their life and that deadly force was necessary and justified," in an interview with case detectives.
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  • Facebook(SAINT PAUL, Minn.) -- More details have emerged about the man who was fatally shot in a car with a woman and child by a Minnesota police officer during a traffic stop Wednesday night.The victim has been identified by family as Philando Castile. He was employed as a nutrition services assistant from November 2002 until being promoted to a nutrition services supervisor at J.J. Hill Montessori Magnet School Aug. 11, 2014, according to The Saint Paul Public School System.Castile also worked at Arlington High School and Chelsea Heights during his employment with the school district, the school system said.In an interview with CNN Thursday morning, the victim's mother, Valerie Castile, described her son as laid back, hard-working and a good person.“He’s been working since he was 15 years old. He‘s been paying taxes since he was 18 years old. He’s been consistently employed all those years. I just don’t understand it," Valerie Castile told CNN. "I’m outraged about the whole situation because he is a really good person. He’s laid back. Everybody likes him. He’s no thug. He don’t run the street. He don’t go to bars. He just does none of that."Nekima Levy-Pounds, the president of the NAACP Minneapolis chapter, also confirmed Castile’s identity in a tweet early Thursday.The incident in Falcon Heights, a suburb of Saint Paul, appeared to be partly documented in a Facebook Live recording posted by a woman in the car, who identified herself as the man's girlfriend and said her daughter was also in the vehicle.Police have identified the woman filming the altercation as Diamond Reynolds.The video, posted Wednesday night, appeared to show an incident similar to the one police have described. It showed Reynolds sitting in a car with Castile, whose shirt appeared to be soaked in blood, saying an officer shot her boyfriend."Please, officer, don't tell me that you just did this to him," she said. "You shot four bullets into him, sir. He was just getting his license and registration, sir."Reynolds can be heard saying on video that the officer "asked him for license and registration. He told him that it was in his wallet, but he had a pistol on him because he's licensed to carry. The officer said don't move. As he was putting his hands back up, the officer shot him in the arm four or five times.”In the interview with CNN Thursday morning, Castile's mother said both her son and daughter have concealed weapon permits for Minnesota. Just hours before her son was fatally shot, Valerie Castile said he was at her house talking with his sister about how concealed-carry permit holders must be cautious, especially African-Americans."My daughter said, ‘You know what, I really don’t even want to carry my gun because I’m afraid that they’ll shoot me first and then ask questions later,’” Valerie Castile told CNN.Valerie Castile said she believes her son told the police officer he was licensed to carry a gun.“I’m sure he did because that was something we always discussed. Comply," she told CNN Thursday morning. "That’s the key thing in order to survive being stopped by the police is to comply. Whatever they ask you to do, do it. Don't say nothing. Just do whatever they want you to do. So what's the difference in complying and you get killed anyway?"The St. Anthony Police Department said in a statement early Thursday that at 9 p.m. on Wednesday "a St. Anthony Police Officer effected a traffic stop on Larpenteur and Fry in the City of Falcon Heights, Minnesota. During the stop, shots were fired. One adult male was taken to the hospital. We have been informed that this individual is deceased."The police department acknowledged there may be video of the incident on social media, and added that no one else was injured and a handgun was recovered from the scene.
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  • NASA(NEW YORK) — The slimy, smelly toxic algae overtaking some waterways in southern Florida is so widespread it can now be seen from space.NASA's Landsat 8 satellite snapped a photo on July 2 showing a blue-green algae bloom in Lake Okeechobee.While algae blooms are a common summer occurrence, they've been especially problematic this year in many southern Florida waterways.Health risks associated with blue-green algae occur when "people or animals are exposed to toxins that are sometimes produced by certain kinds of these organisms," according to the Florida Department of Health. "Exposure can happen through unintentionally swallowing lake or river water, breathing water spray or coming into direct contact with the blooms. At high levels, these can affect the gastrointestinal tract, liver, nervous system, and skin."The department of health added that "it is recommended that people avoid contact with all algal blooms," and that "[c]hildren and pets are especially vulnerable, so keeping them away from the water during a bloom is especially important."Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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