• anama images/Thinkstock(LONDON) — A United Airlines plane bound for Los Angeles was forced to make an emergency landing after striking a bird, an airline official said.United Airlines flight 840 departed from Sydney, Australia but returned to the airport after hitting a bird shortly after takeoff, a United spokesman said.No passengers or crew were injured but emergency crews attended the scene.The plane was temporarily taken out of service for maintenance, though the extent of the damage was not immediately known, a United spokesman said.Passengers will be re-booked on a flight leaving Sydney on Tuesday, according to United Airlines.  Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(RUSH CITY, Minn.) — A U.S. Army veteran used his sharp-shooting military training to rescue a bald eagle who became entangled in a rope and was hanging upside down from a tree, 70 feet off the ground.Last Thursday, Jason Galvin used a .22-caliber rifle with a scope to fire 150 shots at the distant rope that was tangled around the eagle's leg. The bird was hanging upside down in a tree near Galvin’s Rush City, Minnesota cabin, according to his wife.Galvin’s wife, Jackie, wrote on Facebook Friday that her husband was nervous about shooting near the eagle but the couple felt they had no choice after officials said the eagle had been stuck for days and there was “nothing they could do.”“I told Jason he had to shoot it free! He was nervous as he didn't want to get in trouble for shooting at an eagle but I know with his sharp shooter skills that if anyone would save this eagle it was him!,” Jackie wrote in the post.She described the rescue effort taking nearly 90 minutes with a borrowed gun, in difficult conditions. "A neighbor at the cabin drove by and borrowed Jason his .22 as it had a better scope than Jason's," she wrote. "It was windy and he only had about 4" of rope to shoot without hitting the eagle."When the bald eagle was finally freed, the couple wrapped it in a blanket, the post said. The eagle was never hit by one of Galvin's bullets and is now recovering at the University of Minnesota's Raptor Center.The couple named the eagle “Freedom” and hope to be able to release him near they’re home once he is back to good health, Jackie said.“What an amazing hero, my Army Veteran saving an eagle on 4th of July Weekend!” she wrote.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- The explosive that severely injured a man in New York's Central Park Sunday was likely "an experiment with fireworks or explosives," but did not seem like a device made deliberately to hurt anyone, officials said.It was still not clear exactly what the explosive was, but police said they did not believe it was connected to terrorism or that it was placed in the park to harm anyone, police said.Three men were walking in an area of the park not far from the entrance to the Central Park Zoo when the explosion occurred, severely injuring the foot of one of them, a New York Police Department spokesperson said.Police identified the victim as an 18-year-old, and said his friends were interviewed, but they were not suspects.The man was taken to Bellevue hospital with a "possible amputation," a Fire Department of New York spokesperson said. He was in serious but stable condition, officials said early Sunday evening.One of the young men, Thomas Hinds, 20, said the explosion was "definitely not a firecracker." He said his friend, whom he identified as Connor Golden, 18, had his foot "severely mutilated" by the explosion."We were climbing down the rocks, Connor was 6 feet behind me and all of sudden I felt the explosion on my back," Hinds said. "The explosion sounded like a gunshot next to my ears. I turned around and saw his foot which wasn’t completely blown off but was severely mutilated. My other friend Matthew [Stabile, 18] was behind Connor and all he saw was a massive amount of dirt go flying up in the air. My understanding, I could be wrong, is he’s in surgery right now and they are hoping to keep his foot."He said police questioned them separately and "were understandably going at us hard asking about firecrackers because the idea that there would be some sort of bomb in Central Park is really scary."The NYPD bomb squad was on the scene, and a portion of the park was closed for the investigation, police said.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(SARASOTA, Fla.) -- A teen is dead after he was accidentally shot at a Florida gun range, according to the Sarasota County Sheriff's Office.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(PASADENA, Calif.) -- The devastation the California drought has caused to conifer trees in the Sierra Nevadas over the last couple of years "is far greater than previously observed," NASA scientists said in announcement of the publication of new map of the region.David Schimel, a senior research scientist who worked on the study, told ABC News that the map represented NASA's "first close look" at the extent of the damage caused by drought on Sierra trees.Schimel referred to the findings as "millions of trees dying at once."The map was created with measurements from NASA’s Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer instrument, which was developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. The image was created by scientists at the U.S. Forest Service's Pacific Southwest Region Remote Sensing Lab, in McClellan, California, by performing a time series analysis of AVIRIS images taken from NASA's ER-2 aircraft.NASA said that the map will be used to help the USFS assess and respond to the impacts of increased tree mortality caused by the drought.Wildfires have plagued California throughout the summer of 2016.Schimel said the death of the trees was caused by a number of factors, related to climate change."These are trees that have been stressed by heat and a lack of water for a number years," he said. "Some of them died of a lack of water and others died from insects and plants. Trees would normally be resistant to such threats but the drought weakens them."He also said that the map points to what could represent a permanent change in the landscape of the region."The drought has some momentum, there could be a wave of mortality that continues for the next several years," he said. "The biggest concern here is that the trees that are dying are decades old or even centuries old, and this mortality rate means that the Sierras will be changed during our lifetimes and our kids' lifetimes."
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  • (LOS ANGELES) --  California police officers gathered to honor a fallen K-9 team member on Tuesday.Police officers saluted Credo, a Belgian Malinois, as he was carried out of the animal hospital where he was pronounced dead.Credo succumbed to injuries sustained during a SWAT call involving a suspect wanted in connection with an assault with a deadly weapon investigation, the Long Beach Police Department said in a statement.Credo, 4, served served the community with the LBPD for two years and was involved in over 30 apprehensions, according to the department.  "This is going to be a substantial loss to our K-9 corps, to our K-9 handler that has worked with Credo for those last two years and to the Long Beach police family," LBPD Deputy Chief Richard Conant said at press conference on Tuesday."These K-9s are not just dogs. They are police officers. That's going to weigh heavily on the department."The LBPD asked members of the community to keep Officer Mike Parcells, Credo's handler, in their thoughts.
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