• iStock/Thinkstock(PHILADELPHIA) -- A massive fire engulfed a senior living facility west of Philadelphia on Thursday night, sending emergency responders scrambling to remove patients from the large complex. The three-alarm fire in West Chester, Chester County took place at Barclay Friends Senior Living Community and was burning uncontrolled until after midnight. Dozens of residents could be seen being wheeled out on beds and in wheelchairs. Chester County Hospital said it had admitted eight patients, including one paramedic. The hospital said they were suffering from smoke inhalation and minor leg injuries. All area hospitals have been told to expect patients, Philadelphia ABC station WPVI reported. West Chester is about an hour west of Philadelphia.
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  • Image Source/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) --  Almost three feet of snow has fallen over the past 48 hours in the Sierra Nevada mountains in a storm expected to dump heavy rain on the Midwest and Northeast to start next week.The Sierra Nevada in California has seen 30 inches of snow since Wednesday. Oregon's Cascades Mountains have seen heavy snow in the past week, with 5 feet of snow on the ground -- the highest snowpack ever recorded this early in the season.As the storm moves through the Rockies and into the western plains, watches and warnings have been extended from California to Oklahoma and up into the northern plains.The storm system is moving out of California on Friday and moving through the Rockies with heavy snow expected.As the storm moves into the Midwest and Tennessee Valley, strong to possibly severe storms could develop on Saturday. The biggest threat with these storms will be damaging winds, and possibly tornadoes.By Saturday evening, the storm system moves into the Northeast with heavy rain and wind from Washington, D.C. to Boston. Delays at major airports in the region are likely due to the gusty winds and low visibility.Additional snowfall is forecast for the west through the next 24 hours, with up to 2 feet of snow possible in Colorado, and additional 6 to 12 inches is still possible for the Sierra Nevada mountains.The storm system will also bring snow to the Great Lakes and inland Northeast due to the cold air moving over the relatively warm Great Lakes. Some areas could see several inches from Wisconsin to New York state.Behind the storm system, much colder air and gusty winds will cover the eastern half of the United States, with freezing wind chills to kick off the Thanksgiving holiday week. Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- As more restrictions are placed on gun ownership, more people - and criminals - could start to manufacture their own, law enforcement experts tell ABC News.The issue of "ghost guns" or guns without serial numbers has been thrust into the national spotlight after California authorities revealed that the man who engaged in a string of shootings earlier this week that left five dead had two firearms that he manufactured at home.Tehama County Assistant Sheriff Phil Johnston told reporters in a press conference Wednesday afternoon that the two semi-automatic rifles with multi-round clips that gunman Kevin Neal was armed with were illegally manufactured at his home and were not registered. Neal was out on bail on an assault charge he was arrested for in January, and his family said he suffered from a history of mental health issues, such as paranoia. Johnston said that as gun laws become more restrictive, criminals will begin to build their own. ABC News consultants, former NYPD Police Commissioner Ray Kelly and former FBI agent Steve Gomez, said they agree with him.People are already building firearms or modifying existing firearms in an "unlicensed and illegal manner," Gomez said."If lawmakers took steps to make the gun laws more restrictive, those unlicensed home-made firearms would be highly sought after by people and criminals who do not care to comply with the law," Gomez said. These guns are almost impossible to trace, experts say. Tracing the parts of a homemade firearm could be difficult if there are no serial numbers or registered identifiers designated for those parts, Gomez said."That typically is the objective of the manufacturer and end user of the [homemade] firearm - to produce and own a gun that is untraceable by the authorities," Gomez said.The tagline for the site ghostguns.com includes the words "unserialized" and "unregistered," while a description says the company "specializes in unregistered weapons build."Ghost guns pose a threat to society because if someone exhibits behavior indicating the potential to commit violence, law enforcement will not be able to determine if the person possesses a firearm and determine whether he or she has the capability to act out on those violent tendencies, Gomez said."Without the ability to check a database to determine if a potentially violent person possesses a firearm, law enforcement may have a more difficult time determining if a person poses a threat to the public, unless provided with specific facts that would justify an investigation and/or enforcement action," Gomez said.Civilians and especially cops should be worried about ghost guns, Kelly said. When responding to a call, there could be "no record that anyone there has a gun." Although, the same case could be made for illegal guns, too, Kelly added.In addition, unregulated guns may be unsafe and pose a hazard to the user and the surrounding public because they do not meet the same operating standards of regulated firearms, Gomez said.In order to attempt to trace ghost guns, authorities can look at monitoring or even regulating materials that may be used to build a homemade firearm in the same manner that they use to closely monitor ingredients that can be used to make explosives, Gomez said."However, even with increased monitoring and regulations, those individuals intent on having and using an unlicensed and illegal firearm will always seek other alternatives," Gomez said. "Its law enforcement’s job, along with the public’s help, to anticipate and respond to those alternatives that can lead to a violent incident as we saw in Tehama County."  While Kelly agrees that ghost guns are a "problem," he said he does not believe that lawmakers are currently in an environment to place regulations on gun parts."I don't think we're going to get legislation anytime soon that would effectively stop the shipment of ghost weapons," Kelly said.Lawmakers, law enforcement and mental hea
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(LOS ANGELES) --  Two children were killed in an accident involving a police SUV in Los Angeles on Thursday night.The Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department vehicle was rushing to the scene of a gunshot victim at 7:25 p.m. PT when it struck five pedestrians in the Boyle Heights section of the city, according to police.In addition to the two killed, three other pedestrians were injured, and two sheriff's deputies in the vehicle were taken to the hospital, according to authorities. The deputies were treated and released Thursday night. The extent of the injuries to the other three pedestrians was unknown. Police did not provide the ages of those killed, but said both were minors."I was inside in my home and I heard the crash. Within seconds, I was outside and just a few feet from the incident," eyewitness Paulette de la Cruz told Los Angeles ABC station KABC. "When I got there I saw a little boy with a white blanket over him. Another one across, I'm not sure if he was conscious or not, but it didn't look like he was."There were two other vehicles involved in the accident, but no one in the cars were injured.Police said an investigation into the accident was ongoing.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • kodda/iStock/Thinkstock(AMHERST, S.D.) -- Some 210,000 gallons of oil leaked from the Keystone pipeline in South Dakota, TransCanada, the owner of the pipeline, said on Thursday.The company said it shut down the flow of oil on the pipeline at 6 a.m., "after a drop in pressure was detected in its operating system resulting from an oil leak that is under investigation."The leak took place some 35 miles south of the Ludden pump station in Marshall County, South Dakota, the company said in a press release.TransCanada said the leak was "completely isolated within 15 minutes and emergency response procedures were activated.""The safety of the public and environment are our top priorities and we will continue to provide updates as they become available," the press release added.A proposed extension of the pipeline, known as Keystone XL, has been mired in controversy for years. The Trump administration approved the long-delayed 1,179-mile project in March of this year. The proposal was hotly debated and pitted environmentalists against proponents who said it would promote energy independence.The Obama administration previously rejected the proposed pipeline, which would carry crude from Canada through Montana and South Dakota to Nebraska.Nebraska's Public Service Commission is due to rule in the coming days on a permit that would allow Keystone XL to move forward.
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  • Ingram Publishing/Thinkstock(SAN FRANCISCO) -- The 59-year-old psychiatric patient who was on the lam for four days after escaping the Hawaii State Hospital said he left as an "act of desperation."In 1981, Randall Saito had been committed to the hospital in Kaneohe, just outside Honolulu, after he was acquitted of first-degree murder by reason of insanity. He had been missing for 10 hours by the time hospital staff alerted authorities, who then warned the public that Saito was "extremely dangerous and should not be approached."Saito described the mental health facility as "hell in a handbasket," adding that he was spurred to flee because "patients' rights were being denied" in an interview with ABC San Francisco station KGO from the San Joaquin County Jail in French Camp, California, Thursday, one day after he was apprehended in nearby Stockton."I don't want to be in the state hospital," he said. "I'm not safe there."Hawaii's Department of Health, which runs the Hawaii State Hospital, did not immediately respond to ABC News' request for comment.Saito escaped the mental health facility Sunday morning on Oahu and was captured in Stockton, California, three days later. He had been missing for 10 hours by the time hospital staff alerted authorities, Hawaii Gov. David Y. Ige said.Seven hospital workers have been relieved of their duties without pay while officials investigate the incident, officials said.Saito is currently awaiting extradition from California. If he makes the $500,000 bond once back in Hawaii, he will be placed back into the hospital's custody, officials said.Saito was able to make his escape with $6,000 he had in cash as well as a "bogus" driver's license that featured his photograph but an alias for the name, he said, declining to reveal how he obtained the identification or the money.While the hospital has security guards and surveillance cameras, there is no "fencing all around" the campus, Saito said."It's a hospital, not a prison," he said.Hawaii Department of Health Director Dr. Ginny Pressler said at a press conference Wednesday afternoon that Saito's escape was a "result of a major breakdown" in staff protocols, procedures and guidelines at the hospital. An initial internal investigation revealed that staff "may have inadvertently or purposely neglected" to notify supervisors of the incident, Pressler added.Saito did not have a plan in place for after he left the hospital grounds, he said. He chartered a small plane from a private company to go from Honolulu to Maui, and from there, he chose the cheapest ticket out -- to San Jose, California.Once he landed in San Jose, he spent the night in a hotel and tried to "get" himself "together," he said."I couldn't believe I actually made it," Saito said. It was surreal."Saito spent Monday traveling around San Jose looking for a car to buy, but couldn't find a good enough deal, he said.When the cab driver asked him where he wanted to go, he chose Stockton "off the top of his head," and he ended up staying there until he was caught on Wednesday morning.Saito said he mostly stayed in his hotel room, which he noticed was right across the street from where local police officers would fill up their squad cars.He had traveled to Walmart to buy a phone, but later found it was defective, he said. On Wednesday, he said he called a cab and asked the driver to take him back to Walmart so he could exchange it. When the store wouldn't accept the defective phone due to a lack of a receipt, the driver asked Saito where he wanted to go next, Saito said.When the driver told him that he would fill up his tank first, Saito knew it was a setup, he said."I started laughing, because I knew," he said.Saito went inside the gas station store, and when he returned to the cab, he saw the police officers waiting to apprehend him, he said.The San Joaquin County Sheriff's Office said the tip from the taxi cab driver is what led authorities to Saito.Saito said he escaped to prove he could exist
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