• ABC News (KANSAS CITY, Mo.) -- About a year before a 10-year-old Kansas boy was killed in 2016 on a water slide, lifeguard Nathan Campbell experienced firsthand just how dangerous the ride was, he said.Campbell, 20, was a lifeguard at the Schlitterbahn Waterpark in Kansas City the summer Caleb Schwab was killed on the ride, called Verruckt, and was among a group asked in 2015 to volunteer one morning to do test runs on the attraction, he told ABC News."Every morning before the park opened, lifeguards had to test the ride three times and the first two times we rode it everything went well," Campbell said.But on the third test run, something went wrong, he said. The rubber raft he and another lifeguard were strapped into failed to slow down as it reached the run-off pool at the bottom of the 17-story slide."The brakes just didn't work, so we never stopped," Campbell said.He said the raft slammed into a concrete wall at the end of the run-off pool."We kept going, hit a wall and flipped," Campbell said. "I mean, it was going pretty fast. It wasn't a hard hit, but it wasn't quite a soft hit as well."He told ABC News the crash left him with minor back injuries that didn't require medical treatment but nonetheless he was afraid to ever go on the Verruckt again.ABC News has reached out to Schlitterbahn regarding Campbell's allegations but did not immediately hear back."Nobody ever followed up," said Campbell.On Monday, Jeffrey Henry, 62, co-owner of Schlitterbahn Waterpark in Kansas City, was arrested on charges of second-degree murder, aggravated battery and aggravated child endangerment stemming from the Aug. 7, 2016, death of Caleb Schwab on Verruckt. Henry's business partner, John Schooley, was indicted on the same charges and Tyler Austin Miles, the water park's former operations director, was charged with involuntary manslaughter, among many other charges.Henry appeared briefly today in a court in Cameron County, Texas, where he was arrested on Wednesday. His attorney asked a judge to set bond for Henry.An indictment unsealed Tuesday alleges Henry and Schooley designed the water slide without any certifiable expertise and constructed it in violation of "nearly all aspects" of industry safety standards.Investigators said a raft Caleb was in collided with one of a series of metal hoops that held netting over the slide to prevent rafts from going airborne, decapitating the boy. Two women riding with Caleb were also injured; one suffered a fractured jaw bone and the other was left with an orbital bone fracture.The defendants, according to the indictment, also allegedly tried to hide from investigators evidence of at least a dozen other incidents in which passengers were injured on Verruckt leading up to Caleb's death. The water slide opened to the public in July 2014, the same year it was certified as the world's tallest by the Guinness Book of World Records.Corporate emails, memos, blueprints, videos, photos and statements from witnesses allegedly showed that "this child's death and the rapidly growing list of injuries were foreseeable and expected outcomes," according to the indictment.Among the numerous alleged flaws investigators found with the water slide, the braking system appears to have been a persistent problem that Miles was made well aware of, according to the indictment."In addition to numerous oral reports, [there were] 21 written staff reports advising Miles that Verruckt's brake system was in the process of failure..." the indictment reads."On July 15, 2016, 23 days before the death of [Caleb Schwab], a seasonal manager finally heeded the various reports and flagged the brake system as an urgent priority level 1 maintenance issue. Rides that have priority level 1 maintenance issues are not supposed to operate until the repair has been completed," the indictment states."Miles possessed authority to close the Verruckt for this repair, but ... staff did not. Miles chose to continue operating Verruckt unceasingly. No rep
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  • Gabriel Olsen/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- With spring underway, many students and parents are facing the pressures of prom season.Actress Kyle Richards, a star of Bravo's The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills, has four daughters, and has gone through prom season before as a parent, and will go through it again. She recently spoke with ABC News, offering advice on handling the pressures of prom and what parents can do to stay calm and ensure their teens have memorable experiences.Richards says it is important to recognize that the nerves teens experience ahead of and during prom season are entirely normal. Teens have a lot to think about, such as what they should wear, what to do after prom, and whether or not they will be asked out. Richards tells ABC News, instead of thinking about the unknown, teens should take steps to make themselves feel their best even if things do not go according to plan."You want to look beautiful and elegant. You don't want to look back and be like, 'What was I thinking?'" Richards told her daughter when she was picking out her prom outfit. Richards recommends whatever outfit feels best for that person, but they should take their time considering what they want to wear.Richards says employing good skin care practices is another way to boost confidence ahead of prom:"You've got to keep your regimen going because otherwise if it gets out of control, you know what's going to happen and it's going to affect how you feel."She advises cleaning and treating skin weeks in advance, rather than in the final days leading up to prom, recommending teens try products like Clearasil.When it comes to actually going, teens may feel the reservations of not attending prom if they do not have a date."If you're not asked, get your girlfriends and go," Richards told her daughter ahead of one of her school dances. That was exactly what her daughter did, instead of bringing a date, she and her best friend planned to go together, and Richards says there is no shame in doing that.A date is not required, but Richards believes teens should know it is helpful to have a friend or two to go with for support.For parents, Richards recommends keeping an open line of communication with their children, which is something she tries to establish with each one of her daughters. She believes it gave her children the opportunity to open up about their fears early and often so that they could be addressed ahead of prom night.She concedes certain topics like drinking or sex are not the easiest to bring up in conversation, and sometimes kids do not want to talk about them. Richards offered a helpful strategy for opening up those tough discussions though:"I like to have some conversations while I'm driving because then I can keep my eyes on the road... if it's something embarrassing to talk about."Richards also recommended teens and parents could help each other by avoiding one thing in particular: social media."One of the things that tortures me as a parent right now--I feel like what we're seeing on social media and with a lot of these celebrities is everybody has 'facetuned' themselves so much and [with] all of these [camera] filters, you're presenting a fake version of yourself... it's getting to the point where people are getting such unrealistic expectations. You don't look good unless you have a Snapchat filter on? What's the bar?"Richards' generally recommends teens should do what makes them feel like their best selves, and it is important for parents to support that. She is not condemning social media in all of its forms, but is highlighting some of the dangers of it, and believes it is especially important to not focus on the things other people and classmates are doing.It is also a topic parents can bring up with young teens:"My girls, we talk about that a lot... representing a real or fake version of yourself... I'd rather they say that's not the best picture than one that looks nothing like the person I thought they were... just havin
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  • Justin Sullivan/Getty Images(SACRAMENTO, Calif) -- Mourners have arrived at a Sacramento church to mourn the death of Stephon Clark, the 22-year-old man who was unarmed when he was fatally shot by police in his grandmother's backyard on March 18.Clark’s wake was scheduled to take place on Wednesday at the Boss Church in Sacramento, and his funeral will follow on Thursday.Black Lives Matter will also continue their week of protests, with scheduled rallies happening outside the Sacramento District Attorney’s Office Wednesday and Thursday.On Wednesday night, a city council meeting turned chaotic when Stevante Clark, Stephon's brother, stormed into the meeting, yelling and ignoring calls to restore order, as video of the meeting showed. Stevante also climbed on top of a dais where the mayor was seated and began to yell into a microphone."The mayor and the city of Sacramento has failed all of you," Stevante said. "The gang-banging has to stop. The poverty is uncontrollable. I need y'all to hear me."Press Secretary Sarah Sanders was asked about the fatal police shooting of Stephon at a White House briefing on Wednesday.She described the shooting as a “terrible incident” but also said that the problem is “something we feel should be left up to local authorities.”Sanders went on to add: “The president is very supportive of law enforcement. But at the same time, in these specific cases and these specific instances, those will be left up to local authorities to make that determination and not something for the federal government to weigh into."Reverend Al Sharpton will deliver the eulogy at Thursday’s funeral.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- A 9-year-old Texas girl who had been missing for over a year was found safe this week thanks to a tip from a viewer watching the A&E show “Live PD.”Mariah Martinez vanished on Oct. 21, 2016, and was featured Friday in a story on the show, a documentary series that follows police officers in the course of their patrol.A viewer called in a tip about Mariah after watching the show and she was recovered Tuesday in New Mexico with the help of the Lubbock Police Department and New Mexico State Police, according to the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children.“We received a viewer tip & worked w/ Lubbock Police Department & New Mexico State Police to find her,” the organization wrote in a Facebook post. “Big thank you for bringing home one of our missing kids!"Mariah and her siblings, Jeremiah and Leimiah, were reported missing in late October after investigators had secured a court order to take them from their mother's custody, according to the Lubbock Avalanche-Journal.By the time investigators tried to enforce the order, the children and their mother had disappeared.Jeremiah and Leimiah were recovered in January 2017, but their sister had remained missing until now, according to the Avalanche-Journal. Their mother, Amanda Martinez, was arrested when the first two children were found, the Avalanche-Journal reported. It's not clear where her case currently stands.The Lubbock Police Department said in a statement that it "is thankful that the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children continued to place this case at the top of their priority list, ensuring that Mariah return home safely."Further details were not immediately available.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • Johnny Nguyen(MENDOCINO, Calif.) -- A teen who was seen hugging a police officer in a photo that went viral during 2014 protests over the police-involved shooting death of Michael Brown has been reported missing after several members of his family died in a horrific car crash.According to reports, five people have been confirmed dead after the SUV they were in went off a cliff near Mendocino in Northern California, on Monday.Search and rescue teams continue to look for Devonte Hart, 15, and his siblings, 16-year-old Hannah Hart and 12-year-old Sierra Hart. Their parents, Jennifer and Sarah Hart, and three of their siblings died in the crash.Devonte Hart was seen in a photo taken on Nov. 25, 2014 hugging a police officer as tears streamed down his cheek during protests in Portland, Oregon, over Brown's death in Ferguson, Missouri, and a grand jury's failure to indict the officer who shot him. The poignant photo was taken during a national outcry over police brutality.The boy, who was 12 at the time, was carrying a sign at the demonstration that said "free hugs," prompting the Portland police officer to ask him if he would "get one of those." The moment was then captured by freelance photographer Johnny Nguyen.Devonte Hart was the adoptive son of Jennifer and Sarah Hart, ABC Portland affiliate KATU reported.The family is from just outside Woodland, Washington, a suburb of Portland, according to KATU. Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(SAN FRANCISCO) -- A man in San Francisco allegedly brandished an ax at a group of people he was fighting with, then got into his car and charged them, officials said.At least one person has died, according to the Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital. One person remains in critical condition, two victims are in serious condition, and one person is in fair condition, the hospital said.The driver initially fled the scene, according to the San Francisco Police Department.Witnesses told ABC San Francisco station KGO that the driver had an ax and was swinging it at the group he was fighting with. He then got into his van and drove into the people, witnesses said.Police have stopped a vehicle and taken one person into custody, KGO reported. It is unclear if the person detained was the driver.The police department's homicide unit is investigating the victim's death.Further details were not immediately available.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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