• ABC News(WASHINGTON) -- Protesters marched on Washington D.C.'s National Mall on Sunday morning to draw attention to the situation in hurricane-stricken Puerto Rico. "The Unity for Puerto Rico March" featured politicians as well as boldface names, including Lin-Manuel Miranda, whose agenda was to turn a spotlight on the devastated island territory, and work to update the 1920 law called the Jones Act, which mandates that American ships distribute all its goods. Representative Luis Gutierrez of Illinois said Puerto Rico had been neglected, which he called "one of the gravest injustices that I have seen" since he came to Washington as a congressman.Then he took shots directly at President Trump.The president recently unveiled a hurricane aid package that secures $44 billion in aid, a figure that many lawmakers said was too low.He criticized Trump for failing to serve his country in the military, like so many Puerto Ricans do."We have a president of the United States who on four occasion ... said, 'My foot hurts, I cannot serve,'" he said. "But he was able to take those feet to every golf course all over the world and walk on them."The congressman was referring to how Trump received four student deferments from serving in the Vietnam War.During the presidential campaign, Trump told ABC News chief global affairs correspondent Martha Raddatz that during the war he "had a minor medical deferment for feet, for a bone spur of the foot, which was minor."Gutierrez went on to say how Trump has no right to disparage Puerto Ricans, who he said are being shortchanged in relief shipments of food, supplies and medicine."Well, let me just say to the President of the United States each and every time an airplane showed up in World War II, Korea, Vietnam, you filled it with Puerto Ricans and they said 'Presente!'" he said.Sunday's march included protesters young and old who proudly raised the island territory's red, white and blue flag while snaking through the U.S. capital, singing and chanting in unison: "What do we want? Justice! When do we want it? Now!" "Who's in the house? Puerto Rico's in the house!" and also repeating "The Jones Act has got to go."
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  • Twitter/@BenVimont(NEW YORK) -- One driver in Long Island took the concept of "park and ride" a little too far on Saturday when they ended up parked right on the train platform.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- The storm that knocked out power for thousands, closed down local businesses and dropped a tornado in Indiana on Saturday is tracking eastward, ABC News meteorologist Brittany Borer said.Americans from Florida to Maine are getting a piece of this storm Sunday. Radar is showing rain for most, while parts of Maine and even the Buffalo area are seeing cool enough temperatures to receive a wintry mix or snow.Wind gusts of up to 50 mph are expected in some areas, bringing power outages as wind speeds go high enough to break tree limbs.Temperatures will be falling throughout the day as the cold air works in behind the frontal boundary around the East.For the remainder of the day Sunday, lake-effect snow can be expected in eastern portions of the Great Lakes region.Due to the colder air and high wind speeds behind the system, wind chill values will be in the teens and 20s from Marquette, Wisconsin, to Pittsburgh.Folks in far upstate New York could be feeling wind chill values that are below zero Monday morning. Other areas, such as Washington, D.C., New York City and Boston, will feel like the temperature is in the 20s as people head out on their morning commute Monday.In the Northwest, rain is expected to begin Sunday evening in Seattle with windy conditions ahead of the approaching front. Winds could gust up to 55 mph on Sunday.A second system will move up the West Coast on Tuesday, bringing Pacific moisture ahead of it to tag onto the previous system. This will enhance rainfall totals through Tuesday night into Wednesday.The highest rainfall totals of 4-plus inches will be at upper elevations along the Cascades. Portions of the northern Rockies will be seeing heavy snowfall with this system, making travel difficult as the Thanksgiving holiday approaches.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(PITTSBURGH) -- Police have found a vehicle they believe was involved in the killing of a Pennsylvania cop during a traffic stop, officials said Saturday."We were able to find and seize the vehicle that we believe to be involved in this incident," New Kensington Police Chief James Klein said. "The investigation into the vehicle’s full involvement and the occupants that were in the vehicle is ongoing at this time."
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(WEST CHESTER, Pa.) -- More than two dozen people were injured while others remain unaccounted for after a massive fire engulfed a senior living facility west of Philadelphia on Thursday night, authorities said.The five-alarm fire at Barclay Friends Senior Living Community in West Chester, about 35 miles from Philadelphia, began just before 11 p.m. ET Thursday, authorities said. It burned for hours before firefighters brought it under control early Friday. Hundreds of first responders scrambled to rescue the elderly residents from the burning building, evacuating them on beds and in wheelchairs.Approximately 27 people were hospitalized for injuries related to the blaze, West Chester Police Chief Scott Bohn said at a press conference Friday afternoon. All of them are expected to survive, Bohn added. The police chief estimated that 160 people, including residents and staff, were evacuated from the flaming center. The blaze was contained Friday afternoon but continued to burn.Authorities were unclear on the exact amount of people unaccounted for and whether that number includes residents or staff. "As you can imagine it was a little chaotic during the evacuation. There were some folks who were evacuated to West Chester University, some folks went home with family, so we're still trying to account for everybody," Donald Robinson, special agent in charge of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) National Center for Explosives Training and Research, said at the press conference Friday afternoon.The investigation into the cause of the fire is ongoing, and the ATF was on scene Friday. Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(KINGSTREE, S.C.) -- The family of an 86-year-old South Carolina man has settled with the city of Kingstree just a month after the man was tased by police following a car chase.Police dash cam video of the incident shows Albert Chatfield immediately emerging from his car at an intersection and backpedaling from two police officers, who repeatedly shout for him to "stop." As he continues to back up through the street, one officer pulls out his Taser and, after the other officer is heard shouting "tase him," fires it. Chatfield is knocked to the ground instantly.The city agreed to pay $900,000 to Chatfield's family over the incident, one of the fastest settlements in a Taser case in the state ever, according to the family's lawyer. Chatfield remains in the hospital after suffering bleeding on his brain due to the fall, according to ABC affiliate WCIV.Police had claimed Chatfield assumed a "fighting stance" as he backpedaled from police. The video shows the man raising his hands, but he is slowly backing away from the officers throughout. The police report also described the scene as a busy street, saying they were trying to protect Chatfield and others' safety, though the video shows just one car in the intersection."Our lives have been permanently changed," Chatfield's daughter Jodie said at a news conference Friday to announce the settlement. "We've been in ICU for an entire month."The family's lawyer, Justin Bamberg, blamed the police chase on a mental issue. Police had been called after Chatfield was aggressively tailgating other vehicles.Bamberg said the money would be used to pay for Chatfield's medical expenses.
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