• KABC-TV(WHITTIER, Calif.) — A veteran officer was killed and another injured after a parolee opened fire on them after they responded to a traffic incident Sunday in Whittier, California, police officials said.The officers responded to a reported incident — in which a driver, who police said was driving a stolen car, rear-ended multiple other vehicles — around 8 a.m.Lt. John Corina of the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Office said the suspect, who was not named, moved his car around the corner after the collisions.When officers arrived on the scene, the other drivers, who had refused to give the suspect a ride, indicated that he had moved his car.The officers, who did not know at the time that the car was stolen, made contact the suspect and went to pat him down, and he pulled out a gun and opened fire, police said."When they got the call, it was just a traffic accident, and they didn't know what they had," Corina told reporters. "When they went to contact him, that's when the shooting happened."Corina said the suspect was 26, a "known gang member" and was armed with a semiautomatic handgun. He was released from jail a week ago.The officers returned fire, wounding him.The suspect was released on parole two weeks ago and has made statements to police.The two officers and the suspect were hospitalized after the shooting, and one officer, Keith Wayne Boyer, died at the hospital. The surviving officer, Patrick Hazel, and the suspect are in stable condition, according to Corina.Boyer became an officer with the Whittier Police Department in 1990 and was remembered as positive and energetic, according to the department's chief, Jeff Piper.He was from the area and had grown children, Piper said.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- In the wake of 11 new threats Monday against Jewish centers, from New York to New Mexico, the FBI said it is investigating, along with the Department of Justice, bomb threats to the centers across the country.Federal authorities are looking into threats communicated to at least 60 Jewish centers around the country this year. The threats started in January and the FBI began investigating later that same month. The threats have come in "different waves," with more threats phoned in to centers Monday, according to one source familiar with the matter.The FBI said they are "investigating possible civil rights violations in connection with threats to Jewish Community Centers.""The FBI will collect all available facts and evidence, and will ensure this matter is investigated in a fair, thorough, and impartial manner," the FBI said in a statement. "As this is matter is ongoing, we are not able to comment further at this time."This year, a total of 69 threats to 54 JCCs have spanned 27 states and one Canadian province and came in four waves: Jan. 9, Jan. 18, Jan. 31 and then Monday, the JCC Association of North America said.In Monday's wave of threats 11 JCCs received bomb threats over the phone, the JCC Association of North America said. All threats were determined to be hoaxes and all JCCs returned to normal operations, they said.The threats Monday included a JCC in St. Paul, Minnesota, a JCC in Albuquerque, New Mexico, and two Jewish centers around Buffalo, New York.The Department of Homeland Security has also been working on this matter. Almost immediately after the threats are reported to federal authorities, the DHS is informed and disseminates the information nationwide through the Homeland Security Information Network channel "so that others can see that these calls are going on and respond accordingly," one source said.David Posner, director of strategic performance at JCC Association of North America, said that while the JCCs that received the threats have all resumed operations "with a heightened level of security," he added, "we will not be cowed by threats intended to disrupt people’s lives.""While we are relieved that all such threats have proven to be hoaxes and that not a single person was harmed, we are concerned about the anti-Semitism behind these threats, and the repetition of threats intended to interfere with day-to-day life," Posner said. "Local JCCs serve not just the Jewish community, but the entire community. Participants from all different backgrounds come to their local JCCs."The Anti-Defamation League (ADL) said in a statement Monday that the threats are "alarming, disruptive, and must always been taken seriously.""We look to our political leaders at all levels to speak out against such threats directed against Jewish institutions, to make it clear that such actions are unacceptable, and to pledge that they will work with law enforcement officials to ensure that those responsible will be apprehended and punished to the full extent of the law," ADL CEO Jonathan Greenblatt said in the statement.At a press conference last week, when a Jewish reporter started to ask President Trump about a rise in anti-Semitic incidents in the U.S., he said it wasn't a fair question and told the reporter to sit down. Trump then said he is "the least anti-Semitic person you've ever seen in your entire life."He later responded to questions about possible anti-Semitic activity saying, "As far as people, Jewish people ... I think that you’re going to see a lot different United States of America over the next three, four, or eight years. I think a lot of good things are happening, and you’re going to see a lot of love."White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer said Monday, in response to the threats, "Hatred and hate-motivated violence of any kind have no place in a country founded on the promise of individuals freedom. The President has made it abundantly clear that these actions are u
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  • Molly Draper(MARION, Ohio) -- Police across the country are used to solving puzzles, but one Ohio police department recently got a plea for help from a local girl seeking to solve a puzzle of a more mathematical bent.Ten-year-old Lena Draper, 10, decided she needed some help with her fifth-grade math homework, so she took to the Marion, Ohio, Police Department's Facebook page on Friday and messaged them a few problems that she felt needed answering.The police department came to her rescue, messaging the little girl back after she posted the math problem, (8 + 29) X 15. The police department responded with "do the numbers in the parenthesis first so in essence it would be 37 X 15."Lena followed up with another problem: "(90+27)+(29+15)x2"To which the police department replied: "Take the answer from the first parenthesis plus the answer from the second parenthesis and multiply that answer by two."Though they were going above and beyond their duties, in a math faux pas, the answer given to Lena ended up being incorrect, as pointed out by a friend of Lena’s mother. (The correct answer is to add the numbers in the second parenthesis and multiply only that by two, and then add it to the numbers in the first parenthesis.)Lena’s mom, Molly Draper, said she was tickled that the local police department tried to help her daughter with her homework. “I didn’t believe her and asked for a screenshot. I thought it was pretty funny. And I love that they went ahead with it," she told ABC News.In response to the incident, the Marion Police Department posted on its Facebook page that it is a full-service police department that makes every emergency a cause to be answered.When asked if Lena’s math problem ever got answered correctly, her mom said, “I hope so. But we’ll see when she gets her paper back.”For those in need of math equation help, remember the acronym, PEMDAS, which stands for parentheses, exponents, multiplication, division, addition and subtraction -- the order in which mathematical operations should be performed in an equation.
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  • ABC News(NEW YORK) -- Following years of drought, parts of Northern California have experienced a deluge of rain so far in 2017.Rain, heavy at times, is expected throughout Monday in the region, before tapering to scattered showers overnight, according to ABC News meteorologists.Around the area of the Oroville Dam, where residents were forced to evacuate last week following concerns that the structure could falter, 1 to 2 inches of rain were expected, and the area surrounding nearby mountains could get as much as 5 inches or more, meteorologists said.Following the rain, wind gusts Monday evening and overnight could create downed trees, power lines, and power outages in some areas.This has been the wettest start to the year ever recorded in the Sacramento area -- which has now exceeded a foot above normal for rainfall since Oct. 1, 2016, according to ABC News' analysis.Some residents of the region are preparing for the possibility of another evacuation of the region surrounding Oroville, according to the Sacramento Bee, but the water has nevertheless been lowered to a safe level.
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  • ABCNews.com(Cannon Ball, N.D.) — Dakota Access Pipeline protestors that are still camped out in North Dakota could be arrested Wednesday if they do not leave.Protesters have been at the campsite since August as they fight the construction of a pipeline that will carry oil from North Dakota through South Dakota and Iowa to Illinois.  They feel the pipeline threatens the sanctity of the land, and Native American tribes argue the pipeline threatens drinking water and cultural sites.Weather serves as another threat to protests. Protesters may have to move to higher ground amid the possibility of spring flooding.Some protesters tell Bloomberg News they are prepared to be arrested, but will remain peaceful.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • Indiana State Police(DELPHI, Ind.) -- A tip line set up by investigators in the murder of two Indiana teens who disappeared while hiking is filling up with calls from across the country after a man photographed on a nature trail was named a primary suspect in the killings, police said."Everyone is calling us from everywhere," a spokesperson for the Delphi Police told ABC News.The bodies of the two girls -- Liberty Rose Lynn German, 14, and Abigail Jay Williams, 13, both of Carroll County -- were found last Tuesday near a creek, roughly three-quarters of a mile from an abandoned railroad bridge, near Delphi, Indiana, where they were dropped off Monday to go hiking.Indiana State Police named a man in a photograph as the primary suspect in the double homicide investigation Sunday afternoon, but nothing is known about him at this time outside of a single image.Previously, he had been labeled a person of interest, and police said he might only be a witness to the crime.That changed Sunday afternoon."Since Wednesday February 15th, law enforcement officers have distributed a photo of a person observed on the Delphi Historic Trail. The photo appears to depict a white male wearing blue jeans, a blue coat/jacket, and a hoodie," a statement from the Indiana State Police read.Investigators told ABC News that a search warrant was executed at a home in Delphi on Thursday night, but it did not yield anything of value to the investigation.State police referred to "preliminary evidence" that led their attention to the man in the picture, without detailing what it was."During the course of the investigation, preliminary evidence has led investigators to believe the person, in the distributed photo, is suspected of having participated in the murders of Abigail Williams and Liberty German," the statement added.The case has garnered great attention in the otherwise peaceful area of rural Indiana from which the girls disappeared.On Monday, police told ABC News that people in the small city of Delphi bonded together following the tragedy and have been extremely helpful to the investigation."The people of Delphi are being very helpful," the spokesman said. "They are helping in any way that they can."Thousands gathered in Delphi this weekend to take part in a motorcycle memorial ride to commemorate the lives of the two girls.Organizers for the motorcycle rally estimated that more than 3,000 people took part in the ride on Saturday, while hundreds of spectators watched, according to the Lafayette Journal and Courier, a local paper.The paper said that the downtown area of the small city overflowed with motorcycles and cars, who registered for $20 per driver and $5 per passenger to ride from Office Tavern Bar in Delphi to Whiskey and Wine Saloon in Monticello, and that the funds were split between the families of the two victims.ABC affiliate WRTV in Indianapolis reported that residents of Delphi were applying purple ribbons to their homes and storefronts show their support for the victims and their families.The affiliate also reported that several local businesses in Delphi are hosting fundraisers for the families.
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