• iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — Less than 24 hours after Donald Trump takes the oath of office in Washington, D.C., to become the 45th president of the United States, hundreds of thousands of people from across the country will descend upon the nation’s capital to participate in the Women’s March.The march — which will begin with a rally featuring speakers and musical acts — is based on a mission that the rhetoric of the 2016 election cycle “insulted, demonized, and threatened” Americans, leaving communities “hurting and scared.”Organizers say one of the goals of the march is to tell the new administration that on Day 1, “women's rights are human rights.” Despite the name of the event, leaders have made clear that all are welcome to join, not just women.Organizing the event began shortly after Election Day with a Facebook post by Hawaiian grandmother Teresa Shook, who asked friends about marching together as women on the inauguration. Her question soon escalated to a Facebook event, which received hundreds of thousands of RSVPs. But the Women’s March on Saturday isn’t limited to D.C. — “sister marches” and rallies are planned in locations as distant as Nairobi, Kenya, and Osaka, Japan, as well as in most major U.S. cities.The march is billed by organizers as a nonpartisan opportunity for people to “stand together in solidarity with our partners and children for the protection of our rights, our safety, our health, and our families — recognizing that our vibrant and diverse communities are the strength of our country.”With the event happening on the new president’s first full day in the White House, critics contend the march is a protest against Trump’s presidency, particularly as organizations that opposed the president-elect’s campaign joined as partners. The ACLU, Amnesty International, Emily’s List, Planned Parenthood, GLAAD and the Muslim Women’s Alliance all signed on as the event grew in size.Before the march begins, a three-hour rally will be held on the National Mall with musical headliners Janelle Monae, Questlove, and Grimes, along with celebrity speakers that include America Ferrera, Angela Davis, Gloria Steinem, Ashley Judd, Melissa Harris-Perry, and Michael Moore. Planned Parenthood president Cecile Richards is one of the keynote speakers at the event as well.Singer Beyonce has not been confirmed at the event but did post a message to her Facebook page Wednesday writing, “Together with Chime for Change, we raise our voices as mothers, as artists, and as activists. As #GlobalCitizens, we can make our voices heard and turn awareness into meaningful action and positive change. #WomensMarch.”Her sister, Solange, will be in Washington for the Peace Ball — an alternative event happening at the same time as the Trump inauguration balls.The Washington, D.C., Homeland Security and Emergency Management Agency estimates as many as 400,000 people could attend the march, with over 1.3 million registering on the Women’s March website to join around the world.The rally in Washington kicks off at 10 a.m. Saturday, starting at the intersection of Independence Avenue and Third Street Southwest in Washington, D.C., just blocks from the Capitol.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — As thousands of people descend on Washington D.C. for the inauguration of President-elect Donald Trump, months of security planning, intelligence gathering and coordination are coming to fruition to protect lawmakers and the public.The event, like the pope’s visit and the Democratic and Republican national conventions, is designated as a national security event, which unlocks federal resources and allows Secret Service to assume the leadership role for security.While there are no specific or credible threats, almost every federal partner imaginable will be contributing to the security apparatus this weekend, including the FBI, ATF, Park Police, Customs and Border Protection, the Coast Guard, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Department of Energy.The United States Capitol Police Department is responsible for securing the Capitol and the Metropolitan Police Department will be primarily protecting the parade route, while still serving the entire city outside of inaugural activities.In addition, more than 3,000 police officers from around the country are expected and National Guard troops will be patrolling.The PlanningThe planning process has been going on for well over a year, with various agencies holding tabletop exercises, coordination drills and working to staff the massive security undertaking.The Secret Service trained for nearly every contingency. In a simulation, agents practiced how they would handle a drone spraying weaponized gas on the president and the crowd, a suicide vehicle attack as well as administering first aid if the president himself is attacked.“Our number one concern is to keep our protectees and the general public safe and secure during all the inauguration events,” said Brian Ebert, Secret Service Special Agent in Charge.Customs and Border Protection (CBP), which will be contributing to air support on Inauguration Day, did test runs around Washington, D.C. in the week leading up to the event to make sure communication systems were functioning.“With the heightened awareness — the possible threats — we just want to do everything we can to put a stop to that,” a CBP pilot told ABC News' Senior Justice Correspondent Pierre Thomas on one of the test flights in a AS350 A-Star helicopter.The Metropolitan Police Department (MPD) sent personnel to the Democratic and Republican national conventions last year to study the security procedures there, as well studying local demonstrations in Washington, D.C. to prepare for the rallies expected this weekend, some of which has already taken place throughout the city.“We expect by and large, people come here to exercise their First Amendment rights, that's what Washington, D.C. is all about. In the event we have a few that want to create problems, if they break the law, we'll be able to handle that as well,” said MPD interim Police Chief Peter Newsham.He added that if something happens in D.C., “it won't be for a lack of planning.”Security MeasuresLaw enforcement sources from across government told ABC News that they are utilizing a “multi-layered” approach to security.There will be visible layers, like physical barriers, checkpoints with magnetometers, bag searches and patrolling uniformed officers, as well as hidden layers, such as plainclothes officers inside and outside of the perimeter, radiation detection and surveillance cameras."We talk through and identify and gaps in our training or in our communications. So we plan for those up front. On game day, it is seamless, and that is so important, because real-time information is where it's at," said Park Police Chief Robert MacLean.Major roads, tunnels and bridges leading to the Capitol and downtown D.C. will be closed.To protect against a possible vehicle attack, like those that have happened recently in Germany and France, trucks filled with sand will be deployed to block the parade p
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  • Orlando Police Department(ORLANDO, Fla.) --  As suspected Orlando cop killer Markeith Loyd was captured, police chopper video showed that he was crawling on the ground towards a group of officers, after which he appeared to be kicked in the head by at least one officer.Loyd, who was wanted for allegedly killing Master Sgt. Debra Clayton of the Orlando Police Department this month and for allegedly killing his pregnant ex-girlfriend in December, was armed with two handguns when he was caught late Tuesday, according to Orlando police. One of the guns was a Glock that contained a magazine with the capacity for 100 rounds of ammunition. He had been on the run for nine days.In the video of his capture -- which was shot from a police chopper above the scene -- Loyd is seen crawling away from a house and toward officers by the roadway. After he stopped crawling, the officers approached him while he lay prone in the street. At least one officer then appeared to kick Loyd in the head. At that point, the chopper camera panned away.Orlando Police Chief John Mina today called the camera pulling away "concerning" and said the use of force will be investigated.When asked if kicking him was necessary, Mina said, "the officers were very concerned about what was underneath him. After they handcuffed him, and searched him, pulled off his body armor, he had a large bag of ammunition."The police said that, while the case involving Clayton's murder is an ongoing investigation, they decided to release this video.The capture happened late Tuesday after Loyd tried to escape through the back door of a home and was confronted by a group of police; Loyd ran back inside, then came out through the front door, where more police were waiting for him, Mina said.Loyd was holding two handguns and wearing body armor, Mina said. He said that Loyd crawled towards the officers, did not comply with the officers requests and the "officers used force." Loyd dropped the weapons at some point, Mina said, but the specific timing is not clear.Mina said Loyd suffered a fractured left orbital bone and damage to his eye. The accused murderer was hospitalized until late Wednesday.  Mina said Loyd "has a long and violent history" that will be factored into the use of force investigation. Mina said officers are judged regarding the "totality of circumstances" when they look at use of force; officials will try to determine what an objectively reasonable officer would have done in light of those circumstances that night.Officers involved in the arrest are still on full duty, Mina said.Loyd, whom Mina called a "cold-blooded, ruthless killer," was first wanted in December for the death of his former girlfriend and her unborn child, the police said. Loyd also allegedly shot and injured the former girlfriend's brother, police said.Then, on Jan. 9, Loyd allegedly shot and killed Sgt. Clayton, who was a wife, mother and veteran Orlando officer. Mina said today that after Loyd first shot Clayton, he had a clear and unobstructed path to his car, but he chose to run over to where Clayton was. Mina said Clayton was still alive; Mina said Loyd stood "over her defenseless body" and fired multiple shots at her, killing her.Prosecutors announced Thursday night the charges against Loyd in relation to Sgt. Clayton's murder: First-degree murder, attempted first-degree murder with a firearm, carjacking with a firearm, aggravated assault and wearing a bulletproof vest.In connection with the death of his former girlfriend, Loyd was charged with one count of first-degree murder with a firearm, one count of unlawful killing of an unborn child, one count of attempted first-degree murder with a firearm and two counts aggravated assault with a firearm. The judge today set no bond for Loyd's first three charges and set bond at $1,500 for each of the two aggravated assault charges. Loyd did not enter a plea.
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  • ABC News(WASHINGTON) --  Friday is Inauguration Day, and many may be wondering what kind of weather Washington, D.C. will see, since it is mid-January, after all.Well, the good news is temperatures will not be harsh or frigid; they will be on the mild side for the middle of winter, with highs nearly reaching 50 degrees. That means there are no worries of snow, ice or dangerous winter conditions. The bad news is there is a chance of rain throughout much of the day. Inaugural celebrations begin at 9:00 a.m. Temperatures will be at their coldest of the day, in the upper 30s, but gradually rising. A brief hit of rain is possible right before and just at the start of the ceremony. By noon, temperatures are up to the mid 40s, approaching that mild 50 degree mark. After a brief lull in the rain for the mid-morning hours, steadier rain moves in around noon. Moderate rain is possible from 12 p.m. to 3 p.m. After 3 p.m., some brief heavy downpours are possible, just as the parade is about to start. The beginning of the parade may be a bit soggy, but shortly after, the rain should clear up and the rest of the afternoon and evening look dry.This certainly is not the worst weather that ever happened on Inauguration Day. As recently as eight years ago, for Barack Obama's first inauguration, it was a freezing 28 degrees with wind chills in the mid-teens. Looking back in history, the coldest inauguration was in 1985 when it was only 7 degrees as Ronald Reagan became president. The wind chills fell to -10 to -20 degrees below zero that day.But it could have been worse. The worst weather for an inauguration was in 1909 when President William H. Taft's ceremony was forced indoors as a major storm continued to drop 10" of snow in the city. The storm began the night before causing downed trees, telephone polls, crippling traffic jams and essentially brought the capital city to a standstill. It took 6,000 men and 500 wagons to clear 58,000 tons of snow from the parade route.Another terrible, and this time tragic, weather Inauguration Day was in 1841 when President William Henry Harrison was sworn in on a very cold and very windy day. His speech lasted nearly two hours outdoors and he then rode his horse without a hat or coat. After being in such harsh conditions, he developed a cold, eventually led to pneumonia. He passed away a month later.Severe winter weather is always a possibility in the nation's capitol on Inauguration Day since it falls in January. Although it might rain a little bit on the parade this time around, it could have been much worse.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • Orlando Police Department(ORLANDO, Fla.) -- Suspected cop killer Markeith Loyd -- who was caught Tuesday after a nine-day manhunt in Orlando, Florida -- cursed at the judge in a profanity-laced first appearance in court Thursday morning.Loyd, who was wanted for allegedly killing Master Sgt. Debra Clayton of the Orlando Police Department this month, was in court Thursday charged with killing his pregnant ex-girlfriend Sade Dixon in December. He told the judge he wants to represent himself in the court proceedings involving Dixon’s alleged murder. Loyd has not yet been charged in connection with Sgt. Clayton’s murder.Loyd appeared Thursday with a bandage over his left eye, with his hands cuffed and with officers holding each of his arms.In the murder suspect's profanity-laced tirade, he said to the judge about Dixon's murder, "Ya'll making up s--- like I just went in there and shot this girl, endangering my family. ... Ya'll portray this s--- to the news people like I just went in there and shot this girl.""Ya'll been making up s--- the whole time," he said.Loyd claimed he was beaten by police when authorities captured him as he tried to flee a home on Tuesday.
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  • ABC News/Jacksonville Sheriff's Office(JACKSONVILLE, Fla.) -- The South Carolina woman accused of kidnapping a newborn baby from a hospital in Jacksonville, Florida, in 1998 allegedly admitted to the crime over a year ago, according to court documents obtained by ABC News. Moreover, the stolen child knew she had been abducted, the documents showed.Gloria Williams, 51, allegedly abducted Alexis Manigo on July 10, 1998, just hours after she was born at a Jacksonville hospital and raised the girl as her own in South Carolina. Williams allegedly posed as a nurse and told the baby's mother that the newborn had a fever and she needed to take her away, according to Jacksonville Sheriff Mike Williams.Williams, who has not yet entered a plea, was arrested at her home in Walterboro, South Carolina, on Jan. 13 and charged in the nearly two-decade-old kidnapping case.According to the affidavit for the woman’s arrest warrant obtained by ABC News, the Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office received two anonymous tips last year from the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children. The first tip, which authorities received on Aug. 8, stated that Manigo told her friend that she was kidnapped as a baby and is listed as a missing person. The tip also provided authorities with Manigo’s current name, according to the affidavit.The second tip, which authorities received three months later, stated that Williams confessed to taking Manigo from a hospital in Jacksonville, saying she had renamed the girl and claims her as her daughter. The tip also stated the two were living in Walterboro, according to the affidavit.Detectives with the Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office said they interviewed two witnesses who confirmed the anonymous tips, according to the affidavit. The first witness provided a sworn statement that approximately a year and a half ago Williams confessed to him that she “stole” a baby from a Jacksonville hospital and that she renamed the baby Alexis Manigo, according to the affidavit.A second witness provided a sworn statement that approximately a year-and-a-half ago Manigo told her that she had been kidnapped from a hospital in Jacksonville when she was a baby. According to the witness, Manigo said Williams told her she was named Kamiyah Mobley at birth, the affidavit said.ABC News chief legal affairs anchor Dan Abrams said it’s unlikely Manigo will be charged in the case if she was in fact aware of her own abduction and chose not to report it to police.“She’s a victim,” Abrams said on ABC’s Good Morning America Thursday. “She was stolen away from a hospital, she was brought up by the only mother that she knew, so you have to sympathize with her plight.”Williams was extradited from South Carolina to Florida on Tuesday, according to the Jacksonville sheriff. She returned to Jacksonville for her first court hearing Wednesday morning, where a judge set no bond on the kidnapping charge but set bail at $503,000 on the interference with custody charge, citing the unique circumstances and the gravity of harm alleged by prosecutors.Williams is next scheduled to appear in court on Feb. 8.On Jan. 10, Jacksonville detectives arrived in Walterboro and determined that a birth certificate and social security card for Manigo were fraudulent. The social security number listed with Manigo’s name was issued to a male in Virginia, who died in 1983, according to the affidavit.DNA testing showed that Manigo, now 18, was not Williams' biological daughter. Oral swabs recently submitted by Manigo were compared to DNA samples that had been collected and preserved from Manigo's birth. The result was a positive match, according to the affidavit.Manigo, who was given the name Kamiyah Mobley at birth, was reunited with her biological mother and father last week. She appears to be a normal 18-year-old in good health, according to the Jacksonville sheriff.However, in an exclusive interview t
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