• iStock/Thinkstock(MINNEAPOLIS) -- The reason why police did not have their body cameras turned on when they shot and killed an Australian woman over the weekend is a "key question" for investigators, Minneapolis Mayor Betsy Hodges told "Good Morning America" Tuesday.
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  • ABCNews.com(PAYSON, Ariz.) -- The family of an Arizona man who went missing after a deadly weekend flash flood is holding on to hope for his safe return.Hector Garnica, 27, disappeared Saturday after torrential rains flooded the Cold Springs swimming hole in the town of Payson, Arizona, where he and his family were celebrating his wife’s birthday.The trip turned deadly when Garnica’s wife, Maria Garnica, and their three children, Danny, 7, Mia, 5, and Emily, 3, were carried away and killed in the flood. Five other members of the family were also killed, and four people were rescued.Rescue teams have been urgently looking for Garnica via air and ground searches since the incident happened. Authorities hadn’t announced any leads as of early Tuesday morning, but Hector Garnica’s family said they are optimistic."He has to be found, they can't stop looking until he is found," his sister, Carla Garnica, told ABC affiliate KNXV-TV on Tuesday.Hector Garnica's cousin, Iris Garnica, said the entire situation feels like a bad dream."It's something that we wish was a dream, a dream we could wake up from," Iris Garnica told KNXV. "To know that they are OK and they are alive, but we know it's not."
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(MINNEAPOLIS) --  A Minneapolis man who says he's heartbroken and "devastated" after his bride-to-be was shot and killed by police this weekend is "desperate for information" on the shooting.Here's what we know about the deadly Saturday encounter.The shootingJust before 11:30 p.m. Saturday, two Minneapolis police officers "responded to a 911 call of a possible assault," and "at one point an officer fired their weapon, fatally striking a woman," according to the state Bureau of Criminal Apprehension (BCA), the lead investigating agency.The BCA said the 911 call will not be released until the investigation is over.The officers' body cameras were not turned on at the time of the shooting and the squad camera didn't capture what happened, the BCA said, adding that "investigators are attempting to determine whether any video of the incident exists.""When the investigation is complete, the BCA will turn its findings over to the Hennepin County Attorney’s Office for review," the bureau said.The two officers involved are on paid administrative leave, the Minneapolis Police Department said.The victimThe victim was Justine Maia Ruszczyk, 40, the county medical examiner's office confirmed Monday night. She died from a gunshot wound to the abdomen, the medical examiner said.The Minneapolis Star Tribune said she was Australian and went by the name Justine Damond, using the last name of her fiancé, Don Damond."Her maiden name was Justine Ruszczyk," the Star Tribune said. "While the couple were not yet married, Justine referred to herself as Damond on her personal website."Damond's website says she was a yoga instructor, a personal health and life coach and a "meditation teacher, embracing and teaching the neuro-scientific benefits of meditation."Don Damond was overcome with emotion as he spoke to reporters in Minnesota this afternoon.He said Justine Damond called 911 Saturday evening reporting what she believed was an active sexual assault occurring nearby.He said his fiancée's death is "a loss to everyone who knew her.""She touched so many people with her loving and generous heart. She was a teacher to so many and living a life of openness, love, and kindness," he said. "Our lives are forever changed as a result of knowing her. She was so kind and so darn funny. ... It is difficult to fathom how to go forward without her in my life."Family friend Julie Reed read a statement on behalf of Justine Damond's family at a press conference in Australia."She was treasured and loved and we will really miss her," Reed said.The Star Tribune said some people wept at a vigil held in the neighborhood Sunday. About 50 friends and neighbors held hands in a semicircle near the site of the incident, and about 200 or more others watched from the sidewalk and the street, the Star Tribune said.A call for more answersDon Damond said this afternoon he has received very little information from law enforcement regarding what happened after police arrived."We are desperate for information," he said. "Piecing together Justine’s last moments before the homicide would be a small comfort as we grieve this tragedy."Minneapolis Mayor Betsy Hodges said, "I’m sad, disturbed, and looking for more answers, like many of you," including as to why the police body cameras were not on.Hodges said there are "few facts" available to the public at this point, and she called on BCA investigators to share as much information as they can as quickly as they can."This is a tragedy — for the family, for a neighborhood I know well, and for our whole city," Hodges said. "My thoughts are with the family and the community. There is a long road of healing ahead, and a lot of work remains to be done."Minneapolis Police Chief Janeé Harteau called the shooting "clearly a tragic death," saying in a statement, "I want to acknowledge the pain and frustration that family and community members have.""I also want to assure you that I und
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  • Suzanne Kreiter/The Boston Globe via Getty Images(WINDSOR, Conn.) -- The family of a 23-year-old man who was found after seven days missing at sea is trying to prevent him from inheriting millions following his wealthy grandfather’s homicide.Attorneys for the aunts of Nathan Carman filed a petition Monday that alleges he killed his grandfather “out of malice and greed” and asks the court to block the sizeable inheritance he now stands to gain.The petition, which lists the three sisters of Nathan’s mother, Linda Carman, as petitioners, is known as a “slayer action,” which seeks to prohibit a person from receiving an inheritance from someone they killed. The filing points the finger at Nathan for his grandfather’s killing, asking the court to “declare that the murderer was Nathan Carman.”John Chakalos, an 87-year-old real estate mogul who owned a number of nursing homes across New England, was found shot to death in his Windsor, Connecticut, home in 2013. Nathan is the last known person to see his grandfather alive.Nathan was also the last person to see his mother before she disappeared at sea last year. Nathan and Linda Carman were first reported missing Sept. 18, 2016, after they failed to return from a fishing trip off the Rhode Island coast in his boat named “Chicken Pox.”Nathan was rescued a week later from a life raft more than 100 nautical miles from Martha’s Vineyard. Linda has never been found. Nathan claims the boat sank after rapidly taking on water and that he never saw his mother as he entered the life raft, which was enclosed and stocked with food and water.The lawsuit is the first time the Chakalos sisters have publicly accused their nephew in the killing. Nathan has never been charged in either his grandfather’s homicide or his mother’s disappearance, though police have called him the prime suspect in the former case.In an exclusive interview with ABC News’ Linzie Janis, Nathan denied any involvement in his grandfather’s death, saying “he was like a father to me.” Nathan also claimed he did nothing to intentionally sink the boat with his mother on board.However, an investigation by an insurance company blamed Nathan for the incident, claiming he took “intentional” actions that caused the boat to sink.The lawsuit asks for Nathan’s inheritance to be placed into a trust that would be controlled by his aunts. However, the action is about justice rather than money, according to their attorney. “The surviving sisters cannot stand idle while their father's killer, and perhaps their sister's killer also, profits from his actions,” said Dan Small in a statement.Should they win the case, Small says the sisters plan to use the money to pay for expenses related to the investigations into the death of their father and disappearance of their sister, with the rest going to charity.Attorneys for Nathan Carman did not respond to a request for comment.
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  • Google(BRIDGEWATER, N.H.) -- A 12-year-old girl was killed after being run over by a power boat piloted by her father, according to the New Hampshire State Police Marine Patrol.Zoe Anderson was learning to water ski this morning on Newfound Lake in Bridgewater, New Hampshire, when she fell, police said in a press release. Her father, Sherwood Anderson, was steering the boat back toward where she had fallen when "his attention was momentarily distracted as his hat was blown from his head," according to police.Sherwood Anderson put the boat into neutral but it passed over Zoe at a slow speed, causing serious injuries to her torso, police said.Police said the family is from Highland Ranch, Colorado, and the girl's mother, Tonya Anderson, and her 14-year-old sister were also on board the boat at the time of the accident.Her family immediately brought Zoe to shore and first responders attempted to revive her with CPR but were unsuccessful, according to police.The incident remains under investigation, and New Hampshire State Police are asking anyone with information related to the accident to contact Sgt. Joshua Dirth at 603-293-2037.The Bridgewater Police Department and New Hampshire State Police Marine Patrol did not immediately respond to ABC News' request for comment.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(PAYSON, Ariz.) -- The deadly flooding in Arizona that killed at least nine people from a single family this weekend was a "textbook definition" of desert-region flash flooding, according to an ABC News meteorologist.The flooding took place in the area of the Cold Springs swimming hole in the town of Payson, Arizona on Saturday afternoon, officials said. A search-and-rescue operation has resumed this morning for one person, according to the Gila County Sheriff’s office, and a 27-year-old man remains missing after the flood.The incident followed a weather forecast by ABC News' meteorologists predicting "monsoonal related thunderstorms" throughout the weekend in the Southwest.ABC News Meteorologist Max Golembo said that what Arizona experiences during its monsoon season differs significantly from situations where heavy rainfall accumulates in other areas, like Florida, for example -- in part because of the terrain.Soil in parts of Arizona is hard, and dried out from extreme heat that frequently hits over 100 degrees fahrenheit in the summer. That means that falling water isn’t always absorbed into the soil, but instead will frequently accumulate on the hard ground, as it would on concrete, Golembo notes.The rain that had accumulated in northern Arizona over the weekend came very rapidly prior to the deaths of the nine family members -- at a rate of roughly 1.5 inches per hour.That rain had nowhere to go but downstream, according to Golembo.Officials described a six foot high wall of water, rushing at 30 miles per hour, following that rapid accumulation of rainwater.Arizona's long periods of sustained, dry heat also likely made the rush of water significantly more dangerous as it traveled downstream to the area of the sinkhole, according to Golembo.He said that the dry heat in Arizona also weakens trees and brush. making it easier for them to break apart under pressure. As a result, debris accumulates in the flowing water."When water sweeps along it can pick up the branches and take them along," he said. "That's why in video of the flooding, the water has that very dark color."Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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