• iStock/Thinkstock(ST. LOUIS) -- The St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department is investigating reports that one of its officers posted a meme on Facebook that referred to Black Lives Matter protesters as "domestic terrorists," according to a local newspaper.The announcement came earlier this week amid protests in St. Louis over a judge's decision to acquit a white former police officer in the 2011 shooting death of a black man.Lisa Clancy, a participant in the protests, said a St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department officer posted the meme in the comments section of a Facebook post she wrote on Saturday, explaining why she attended the protests, according to the Belleville News-Democrat.Clancy alleged that the officer commented on her original post with a photo from a Black Lives Matter rally with “the Klan with a tan” and “domestic terrorists” superimposed on it.Clancy also posted a screenshot of the interaction on Twitter on Sunday, tagging both the St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department and St. Louis Mayor Lyda Krewson.The controversial comment has since been deleted, and ABC News was unable to reach the owner of the Facebook account in question.A spokesperson for the St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department told the Belleville News-Democrat on Monday that the department had launched an internal investigation into “the matter,” but they did not confirm if the person was indeed one of its officers.Monday morning marchMore than a thousand peaceful demonstrators carrying "Black Lives Matter" signs and ones that read "No Justice, No Profits" took to the streets in St. Louis last week after St. Louis Circuit Judge Timothy Wilson found Jason Stockley, 36, not guilty of first-degree murder and armed criminal action. On Dec. 20, 2011, the then-police officer shot 24-year-old Lamar Smith five times after a high-speed chase and crash.Some 160 people have been arrested since the demonstrations began on Friday, according to figures released by the St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department Tuesday as the protests carried on into a fifth day.Leaders of multiple faiths on Tuesday called for peace and justice amid the chaos that followed Friday's acquittal. Speakers at the service included Roman Catholic Archbishop Robert Carlson, black church pastors, and Jewish and Muslim leaders."Let us remember that we are not a divided humanity, but a human family," Carlson said. "Let us show love instead of hatred."Protesters gathered outside the jail in downtown St. Louis for more than two hours on Monday to show solidarity with those who remain behind bars, but there was no repeat of the vandalism that occurred over the weekend, according to reports.Organizers of the peaceful protests said they were frustrated with the demonstrators getting unruly at night, saying they could make it harder for them to spread their nonviolent message. Krewson on Tuesday said she's planning to meet with protesters.“Today we saw again that the vast majority of protesters were nonviolent,” Krewson said during an early morning briefing on Monday. “But, for the third day in a row, the days have been calm and the nights have been destructive.”The St. Louis Police Department also tweeted images of confiscated knives, guns, masks and other types of protective gear from a “rioter” who police said was arrested.Local organizer Anthony Bell said he understands why some act out, but he urged people to remain calm.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(ST. LOUIS) -- The St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department is investigating reports that one of its officers posted a meme on Facebook that referred to Black Lives Matter protesters as "domestic terrorists," according to a local newspaper.The announcement came earlier this week amid protests in St. Louis over a judge's decision to acquit a white former police officer in the 2011 shooting death of a black man.Lisa Clancy, a participant in the protests, said a St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department officer posted the meme in the comments section of a Facebook post she wrote on Saturday, explaining why she attended the protests, according to the Belleville News-Democrat.Clancy alleged that the officer commented on her original post with a photo from a Black Lives Matter rally with “the Klan with a tan” and “domestic terrorists” superimposed on it.Clancy also posted a screenshot of the interaction on Twitter Sunday, tagging both the St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department and St. Louis Mayor Lyda Krewson.The controversial comment has since been deleted and ABC News was unable to reach the owner of the Facebook account in question.A spokesperson for the St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department told the Belleville News-Democrat on Monday the department had launched an internal investigation into “the matter,” but they did not confirm if the person was indeed one of its officers.More than a thousand peaceful demonstrators carrying "Black Lives Matter" signs and ones that read "No Justice, No Profits" took to the streets in St. Louis last week after St. Louis Circuit Judge Timothy Wilson found Jason Stockley, 36, not guilty of first-degree murder and armed criminal action. On Dec. 20, 2011, the then-police officer shot 24-year-old Lamar Smith five times after a high-speed chase and crash.Some 160 people have been arrested since the demonstrations began on Friday, according to figures released by the St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department Tuesday as the protests carried on into a fifth day.Leaders of multiple faiths on Tuesday called for peace and justice amid the chaos that followed Friday's acquittal. Speakers at the service included Roman Catholic Archbishop Robert Carlson, black church pastors, and Jewish and Muslim leaders."Let us remember that we are not a divided humanity, but a human family," Carlson said. "Let us show love instead of hatred."Organizers of the peaceful protests said they were frustrated with the demonstrators getting unruly at night, saying they could make it harder for them to spread their nonviolent message. Krewson on Tuesday said she's planning to meet with protesters.“Today we saw again that the vast majority of protesters were nonviolent,” Krewson said during an early morning briefing on Monday. “But for the third day in a row, the days have been calm and the nights have been destructive.”The St. Louis police department also tweeted images of confiscated knives, guns, masks and other types of protective gear from a “rioter” who police said was arrested.Local organizer Anthony Bell said he understands why some act out, but he urged people to remain calm.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • United States Congress(NEW YORK) -- Jimmy Kimmel ripped into Republican Sen. Bill Cassidy of Louisiana on his show Tuesday night for proposing new health care legislation that Kimmel said fails the "Jimmy Kimmel test" that Cassidy himself had proposed in an appearance on "Jimmy Kimmel Live!" in May.Cassidy appeared on the program earlier this year after Kimmel made an emotional plea for health care legislation that would insure affordable health coverage for all, including people with pre-existing conditions and with no lifetime caps, in the wake of Kimmel's newborn son needing life-saving heart surgery.But Kimmel said Wednesday night the new legislation Cassidy and co-sponsor Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., have proposed in the Senate did not meet those requirements."Not only did Bill Cassidy fail the Jimmy Kimmel test, he failed the Bill Cassidy test," Kimmel said. "He failed his own test."Kimmel didn't mince words for Cassidy, who Kimmel said "wasn't very honest" when he appeared on the show in the spring."I don't know what happened to Bill Cassidy, but when he was on this publicity tour he listed his demands for a health care bill very clearly. These were his words: He said he wants coverage for all, no discrimination based on pre-existing conditions, lower premiums for middle class families and no lifetime caps. And guess what? The new bill does none of those things," Kimmel said.Speaking directly to Cassidy, Kimmel said, "Stop using my name, all right, 'cause I don't want my name on it. There's a new Jimmy Kimmel test for you, it's called a lie detector test, you're welcome to come by the studio and take it any time."Kimmel also had strong words for critics on social media unhappy that he has turned his son's health into a political cause."Before you post the nasty Facebook message saying I'm politicizing my son's health problems, I want you to know, I am politicizing my son's health problems because I have to," he said.Kimmel listed the many health care organizations that have opposed the legislation and called on viewers to take action saying of bill's backers."They're counting on you to be so overwhelmed with all the information, you just trust them to take care of you. But they're not taking care of you," Kimmel said. "They're taking care of the people who give them money, like insurance companies, and we're all just looking at our Instagram accounts, liking things, while they're voting on whether people can afford to keep their children alive or not."
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  • iStock/ThinkStock(NEW YORK) -- With Hurricane Maria bearing down, residents in Puerto Rico are hunkering down, preparing for 175 mph winds, 6- to 9-foot storm surge and up to 25 inches of rain. Unfortunately, most of the homes in Puerto Rico are built to withstand just 125 mph winds, characteristic of a Category 2 hurricane, according to one expert on building codes on the island.With current gusts reaching 175 mph or more, the Category 5 storm, which slammed into the eastern Caribbean islands of Dominica and Guadeloupe Monday night, is expected to wreak havoc on the island, with the governor calling it the "potentially most catastrophic hurricane to hit Puerto Rico in a century.”According to University of Puerto Rico at Mayagüez engineering professor Dr. Luis Aponte-Bermúdez, Puerto Rico adopted the "International Building Code" in 2011, which requires residences withstand 140 mph winds, characteristic of a Category 3 storm.When it comes to wind worthiness, these building codes are similar to the ones that govern mainland U.S. cities like Miami, an engineer at the Insurance Institute of Business & Home Safety tells ABC News.However, the majority of the homes on the island were built prior to 2011, to a weaker code, and were "grandfathered" in.Before 2011, Puerto Rico was using the "Uniform Building Code," which only required residences to withstand 125 mph winds, adopted after Hurricane Georges pummeled Puerto Rico in 1998.Most legally built homes on the islands use that UBC 125-mph standard.Worse still, many homes dotting the island fall into what's called "informal construction" -- built to no standard whatsoever.These are homes built illegally, without proper regulation, by people who lack the economic resources to hire a constructor and instead just buy wood and other materials from the local hardware store.These structures are "extremely vulnerable ... most of these homes are going to get destroyed," Aponte-Bermúdez says, noting that many similar homes on the nearby island of Culebra were recently wiped out by Hurricane Irma."With the passage of Hurricane Irma, the people of Puerto Rico not only demonstrated our resilience, but we banded together to show our kindness and hospitality to thousands of our fellow Americans in the U.S. Virgin Islands, BVI [British Virgin Islands], St. Marteen and beyond," Puerto Rico Gov. Ricardo Rosselló said Tuesday afternoon."Now we’re looking down the barrel of Maria, a historic Category 5 hurricane. Although it looks like a direct hit with major damage to Puerto Rico is inevitable, I ask for America’s prayers," he continued. "No matter what happens here in the next 36 hours, Puerto Rico will survive, we will rebuild, we will recover and with your support, we will come out stronger than ever."
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  • ABC News(NEW YORK) -- As residents of Puerto Rico brace for Hurricane Maria -- which slammed into the Caribbean as a Category 5 storm Monday night -- Puerto Rico's governor is calling the storm "the biggest and potentially most catastrophic hurricane to hit Puerto Rico in a century.”
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  • John McCall, South Florida Sun-Sentinel/TNS via Getty Images(HOLLYWOOD HILLS, Fla.) -- A ninth person has died after a Florida nursing home lost its air conditioning in the aftermath of Hurricane Irma, subjecting the residents to sweltering heat.
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