• KSTP/ABC News(MINNETONKA, Minnesota) -- A high-speed police chase of luxury sports car that looked like something out of movie was caught on newly-released dashcam footage.A lime green Lamborghini, a Ferrari, another Lamborghini and an Audi were among the pack speeding as fast as 110 mph on a Minnesota highway. The video shows Minnesota State Patrol Lt. Paul Stricker pursuing the pack of exotic cars for several miles along Interstate 394 in April 2016 and captured his conversations with the drivers when he finally caught up with themStriker asked one of the drivers if he knew why he was being pulled over."For speeding?" the driver said."A bunch of beautiful cars going that fast out here," Striker replies. "It’s like Cannonball Run all over again," referencing the ‘80s movie starring Burt Reynolds. Some of the drivers were pulled over along the highway and others were detained at a gas station nearby.After issuing the drivers speeding tickets, Striker sends them on their way with a bit of advice."You guys have got beautiful cars, enjoy them," he said in the dashcam footage. "But, just run them in the right spot. There's tracks around, I know you can run them."The cases have now been closed, allowing the video to be released, Minnetonka City Attorney’s office confirmed to ABC affiliate KSTP.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(PARKLAND, Fla.) -- Two more South Florida teenagers were to be mourned at funerals today, days after they were gunned down at their high school.Luke Hoyer and Alaina Petty were among the 17 people who died in the Valentine's Day rampage at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida. The suspect, a former student, was arrested and has been charged with 17 counts of premeditated murder. The school remains closed.The funerals for the slain students, teacher and coach started Friday.Alaina was "a vibrant and determined young woman" who "loved to serve," her family said in a statement, according to the South Florida Sun-Sentinel.Alaina participated in the high school Junior Reserve Officers' Training Corps (JROTC) program and volunteered for a program with The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, the family said, according to the newspaper.Alaina helped rebuild areas of Florida after the state was hit by Hurricane Irma in September, the family said, adding, "Her selfless service brought peace and joy to those that had lost everything during the storm.""While we will not have the opportunity to watch her grow up and become the amazing woman we know she would become, we are keeping an eternal perspective," the family said, according to the newspaper. "We are grateful for the knowledge that Alaina is a part of our eternal family and that we will reunite with her." Luke's aunt, Joan Cox, told People Magazine that she and Luke's mother would talk about Luke's future."He didn’t know what he wanted to do yet," she said. "He was just a freshman and was looking forward to high school.” Luke was close to his mother, Cox said."It was just the two of them all of the time,” she told People. “He was momma’s boy and he loved his family so much."“He was always smiling and very laid back,” Cox added. “He never caused any trouble. He was just a good boy and had a great life.”
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  • ABC News(PARKLAND, FLA.) --  The couple who took in the teen accused of killing 17 people today said they did not see any warning signs before the massacre at a South Florida high school last Wednesday."Everything everybody seems to know we didn't know," James Snead told ABC News' Good Morning America.James and Kimberly Snead opened the doors of their Parkland, Florida, home to Nikolas Cruz, 19, after his adoptive mother died in November. Cruz was adopted as an infant, and his adoptive father died in 2005."It's a roller coaster of emotions," James Snead said of the mass shooting aftermath. "It's still tough. We're still hurting. We're still grieving."While Cruz was briefly staying at the home of a longtime family friend after his adoptive mother died, he went to live with the Sneads at Thanksgiving because their son was a friend of his."He was very polite. He seemed normal," James Snead said, adding that he obeyed all the house rules "to a T."James Snead, 48, is a U.S. Army veteran and Kimberly Snead, 49, works as a nurse.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(PARKLAND, Fla.) -- Nikolas Cruz, whose troubled past allegedly exploded in a murderous rampage Wednesday in a Parkland, Fla., school Wednesday, was captured on cell phone video fighting other students more than a year before the mass shooting. In the September 20, 2016, footage, obtained by ABC station WPLG, Cruz can be seen in the courtyard of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School wearing khakis, a white printed short-sleeved T-shirt and a dark bandana around his neck.The blurry video appears to show Cruz flailing his arms as other students charge him and cause him to slip.Cruz was suspended for two days following the fight. It's one of five documented incidents that Marjory Stoneman Douglas officials claim led to Cruz being forced to transfer to another high school last February.On Wednesday, Cruz -- who had raised numerous red flags for showing signs of violence -- allegedly entered the high school with an AR-15 and fatally shot 17 students and teachers.Cruz faces 17 counts of premeditated murder in the massacre and, law enforcement officials said, confessed to the massacre.
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  • Mark Wilson/Getty Images(PARKLAND, Fla.) -- He saved lives in uniform and, his friends say, didn't flinch in the face of an alleged mass shooter in a Parkland, Fla., high school last week.Now, friends of 15-year-old Peter Wang are trying to posthumously honor the "hero" by petitioning for a military burial.Were it not for the heroics displayed by Peter, his friends are certain the death toll on Wednesday would have been higher.Nikolas Cruz, 19, allegedly gunned down innocent and unarmed students and teachers with a semiautomatic rifle. He's been charged with 17 counts of murder.When the mass shooter was marching straight for Peter's classroom, according to one of his close friends who were there, Wang stood tall in full Junior Reserve Officers' Training Corps (JROTC) regalia and sacrificed his life as he ushered other students and teachers to safety."He was pointing the door open for other people to escape and then he was struck by the bullets," classmate and friend Aiden Ortiz told ABC station WPLG-TV."I want people to know he died a hero," the teen added. "He died saving many people."Just days after the shooting, Aiden says he's still struggling with losing his friends."Every time I sleep I just keep thinking of bodies," he said. "I'm thinking of who's there and who's not there anymore."Another classmate, Rachel Kuperman, remembered the last time she saw Peter. It was the day before the shooting, and she was trying to figure out what to do after realizing she forgot her lunch.True to form, Peter came to the rescue."He went to the vending machine with me and he bought me Sprite and candy and snacks," she said in an interview with WPLG-TV, before covering her face with her hands and breaking down in tears. "He put others before himself."Aiden and Rachel have pushed to formally revere Peter by spearheading a petition on the White House website "We the People." The goal is to have the federal government bury Peter with military honors."His selfless actions have led to the survival of dozens in the area," the petition, started Friday, reads. "Wang died a hero, and deserves to be treated as such, and deserves a full honors military burial."By Sunday evening the petition garnered 17,000 signatures. It needs a requisite total of 100,000 signatures within 30 days to receive a White House response.Peter's funeral and burial are scheduled to take place on Tuesday morning in Coral Springs, Florida.
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  • Mark Wilson/Getty Images(PARKLAND, Fla.) -- As two more funeral services were held Sunday for victims of the latest American mass school shooting, authorities told ABC News that a major step toward healing Parkland, Fla., would be to demolish the building where 17 students and teachers were gunned down.Mourners crowded into Temple Beth El in Boca Raton for a private funeral service for Scott Biegel, the 35-year-old geography teacher shot to death at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School on Wednesday as he tried to protect students from the gunman.Earlier, family and friends held a memorial for 14-year-old Alexander Schachter, a freshman and trombone player in the school marching band, at the Heron Bay Marriott in Coral Springs.Broward County Schools Superintendent Robert Runcie said he and officials believe a fitting tribute to Biegel, Alexander and 15 others killed in the massacre would be tear down the building the shooting occurred and turn the space into a memorial park."So I will tell you that we...aren't having any classes held in that building going forward," Runcie told ABC News. "What the ultimate disposition of that building is, we don't have any definitive answer. I can tell you what the aspirations of the community are and I agree with them, is that that building should be demolished and a memorial erected there."Broward County Sheriff Scott Israel said the bullet-riddled Building 12 at the high school is still a crime scene, where investigators are combing for evidence.The sheriff, whose department is leading the investigation of the killing spree, told ABC News he agreed that "as soon as humanly possible, that building be destroyed forever.""Kids shouldn't have to walk by and even look at that building. It's just a stark reminder of the horrific, detestable killings that went on that day," Israel said.School officials announced Sunday that Stoneman Douglas High School will remain closed through at least Wednesday."The goal is to allow staff to return to campus by the end of the week," according to a statement from the Broward County School District.Israel said three of his children, triplets, all attended Stoneman Douglas High School and had classes in Building 12 when they were freshmen in 2015."When I walked through the school for the first time, and I certainly wouldn’t be graphic about what I saw, I don’t think that’s appropriate for TV, but as I started to internalize what I did see, I was imagining three years earlier, when my children were freshmen, being in that same room," Israel said. "It was heart-wrenching."Four patients injured in the shooting remained hospitalized, all in fair condition, according to Broward Health Systems officials.Israel said the alleged killer, 19-year-old Nikolas Cruz, is in solitary confinement under suicide watch."We always have eyeballs on him," Israel said, adding that Cruz has stopped speaking with investigators."The killer has his constitutional rights -- has decided not to speak. He has an attorney, and his attorney has made it clear. So we've stopped the questioning phase," Israel said. "So now the investigation is in the hands of my lab people, my crime [and] CSI people."Cruz's lawyer, Broward Public Defender Howard Finkelstein, told ABC News he is willing to have his client plead guilty immediately in return for the prosecution agreeing to take the death penalty off the table.But Israel said he has heard from many people in the community who don't want to see any leniency granted to Cruz."I think Howard would tell you that it'll be easier to heal if we don't have a trial and everything that would go with it over a plethora of years," Israel said. "But there are people out there who told me, 'I don't wanna go to bed tonight with him alive.' So the death penalty has to be considered, and that's not my call."Broward County state attorney Michael Satz issued a statement on Saturday, saying: "This is certainly the type of case the death penalty was designed
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