• iStock/Thinkstock(PANHANDLE, Texas) -- The remains of two of the three railroad employees who went missing during a fiery crash between freight trains have been recovered, Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railway said today.The third missing employee is still unaccounted for, the railway said. Recovery efforts for the missing employee are continuing, according to the National Transportation Safety Board.Four BNSF employees were involved when the two trains collided Tuesday morning near Panhandle, Texas."They just went face to face with each other and collided," witness Mason Maas told ABC News. "I've never seen a crash like this."While three employees were missing Tuesday, the fourth employee was found and hospitalized in stable condition, said Patrick Buckley of the Northwest Texas Hospital in Amarillo.Texas Department of Public Safety Sgt. Dan Buesing told ABC News earlier today that all three missing employees were presumed dead. He said crews moved from a rescue effort to recovery operation Tuesday night.  “The entire BNSF family is terribly saddened by this event and we extend our deepest sympathy and thoughts to the families and friends of the employees involved in this incident," Carl Ice, President and Chief Executive Officer of BNSF Railway, said in a statement today. "This is an extremely difficult time and our entire organization grieves for the loss of our colleagues."Buesing said today the cause of the crash remained under investigation.Rail Safety Investigator Richard Hipskind of the NTSB - which is overseeing the investigation - said today the collision caused at least 1 of the trains to derail. The investigation will focus on mechanics, equipment, human operator error, data recorders and witness reports, Hipskind said.BNSF said in a statement Tuesday: "Our investigation is in the very early stages but based on the limited information we have reviewed, it appears that this is the type of incident that positive train control technology (PTC) is intended to prevent. This is why we have been aggressively deploying PTC across our network. While sections of the track operated by the eastbound train involved in this accident have PTC installed and are being tested, the section of track where the incident occurred will be installed later this year."
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) --  The “only thing” that stopped a Pennsylvania man allegedly bent on gunning down people at the White House last month “was a gunshot to his chest” by a Secret Service agent.That’s the assessment of a federal judge after prosecutors played surveillance video in court this week showing exactly what led the Secret Service agent to open fire on Jessie Olivieri last month.On May 20, Olivieri left his home in Scranton, Pennsylvania, and drove his white Toyota Camry to a park near the White House, according to U.S. Magistrate Judge Michael Harvey.After apparently firing one shot there, Olivieri approached the White House, passing through a security gate on the perimeter of the White House grounds and ignoring Secret Service officers’ orders to stop, Harvey noted.When Olivieri reached an inner gate, another Secret Service agent confronted him.“The agent, standing behind the gate and in [Olivieri’s] path, ordered [him] to halt and drop the gun. He did neither, even seeming to wave off the commands with the hand not holding the gun. Moments later, the agent shot him in the chest,” Harvey wrote in a court document filed today and based on the video, which was obtained by ABC News.Authorities said Olivieri later told authorities, “I came here to shoot people,” and that he went to the White House looking to commit “suicide by police.”His “actions endangered not only himself and the officers, but also the community, since innocent citizens may have been caught in crossfire between Defendant and the officers,” Harvey said in today's filing, ruling that Olivieri must stay behind bars pending trial.In his ruling, Harvey indicated he believes Olivieri may suffer from mental illness.Olivieri now stands charged with forcibly resisting or impeding a law enforcement officer in the execution of his duties with a dangerous weapon, and “attempting and conspiring to do the same.” If convicted, he faces up to 20 years in prison.Olivieri's attorney did not immediately respond to ABC News' request for comment.Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Firefighters rescued eight people who got stuck on a roller coaster 100 feet above the ground in Oklahoma city. The Oklahoma City Fire Department responded to the scene at the western-themed amusement park Frontier City this afternoon and rescued eight passengers. No injuries were reported, according to the Fire Department's official Twitter account.In a statement, Frontier City said a train on the Silver Bullet ride stalled on the lift. The back half of the cars were able to be evacuated by park personnel, but due to the position of the train, firefighters were called in to escort the riders in the front cars to the ground."Guest safety is Frontier City’s top priority," the park said, adding that a "thorough investigation" into why the ride stalled will take place.Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • Alexandra Poulos (LANSDOWNE, Pa.) -- Alexendra Poulos, of Lansdowne, Pennsylvania, always knew there was something special about her house. And now, her suspicious have been justified.Poulos believes she’s discovered a piece of true American history— a secret room below her basement that was once part of the Underground Railroad.“This is such a weird, odd story,” Poulos, 43, told ABC News of her beloved white, Colonial-style home. “When I was a child I would have random dreams about there being other rooms in the house. I’d look it up on dream meanings sites and people always thought I just had a crazy imagination.”When her mother and her brother passed away within a year of each other, Poulos had her father sign over the rights of the home to her so it would remain in their family, despite him moving out.“It’s my childhood home. My parents bought it in 1974,” she explained. “I had my dad sign the house over to me because I just love it so much. I started renting it out and now we have awesome tenants. They’re such awesome people and they remind me of my family.”Recently however, the burdens of being a landlord starting sinking in when multiple things in the home’s basement starting breaking one after another.“First it was oil tank that went, and then after that it was an old cast iron sewer pipe that just started cracking, so I had to get that replaced,” she said. “And then Jerry [her tenant] called me and said, ‘Alex, you have to come to the house because there’s cracks in the walls. I always respond right away because I try to keep the house as I would want it because I still love it.”With the basement fresh on her mind, she remembered a rumor that a former neighbor told her father years ago.“There was a neighbor out back, an old doctor and his wife,” Poulos recalled. “She told my dad, ‘You know there’s a basement under your basement.’ My dad just thought she was crazy or whatever. Long story short, I always had that in the back of my mind."“For the past couple weeks I’ve been looking stuff up on the history of homes in the area,” she added. “It was like 2 a.m. one night and I came across an article that said there was this house that’s like a five minute drive from my house, and the owners found out it was linked to the Underground Railroad. They said they knew it was down there and they knew it was covered up by cement. And then I knew -- that was it.”The light bulb had gone off in her mind that perhaps her home could be associated with the Underground Railroad, also.When Poulos called Baldwin Masonry to make sure the cracks were taken care of in the basement to support the foundation, she asked them an odd question.“I asked him if when he’s digging in the basement, ‘Can you dig a little deeper?,’” she said of the unusual request. “And I knew he thought I was a total nut. But I explained the possible historical connection and he wrote me back and said, ‘Yeah, I’ve never encountered anything like that but that would be really neat.’”The very next day, the homeowner got a call from the workers that they had found something strange.“I get a call saying, ‘You’re not going to believe this. They found it,’” Poulos said of the large hole in the basement floor that leads to entirely new room 14-feet-below. “I said, ‘You’re joking.’ I swear to God they found it. It’s a whole other area of the house.”“It’s just suspicious because I think what we found might have pre-dated the house being built,” said Jerry Sanders, Poulos’ current tenant. “It’s about 14 feet deep, and maybe about 6 to 8 feet wide by about 15 feet long. It’s a nice size room.”There is also a makeshift stone
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) --  Airports across the country are seeing an increased security presence inside and outside their terminals as Istanbul reels from an attack that left at least 41 people dead and 239 others injured.According to Turkish Prime Minister Binali Yildirim, a trio of armed attackers opened fire last night before blowing themselves up at Turkey’s biggest airport, where travelers are screened before even entering the terminal.The procedures at Istanbul’s Ataturk International Airport are similar to those across the Middle East, but unlike those in the United States.Airports in New York, Miami, Atlanta and San Francisco told ABC News they will have an increased police presence in the wake of the attack, but at no American airport will you find screening prior to the terminal.Aviation security in the United States has focused its efforts on the security checkpoints after the ticket counters, where the Transportation Security Administration screens all passengers and luggage just prior to the secure area.Local law enforcement in the United States takes the lead on any security before these checkpoints, but does not screen travelers as they arrive at the airport.Someone departing a major airport in the Middle East, however, would likely see enhanced safety efforts prior to their entry to the terminal.Security for your flight out of Tel Aviv’s Ben Gurion Airport begins before you even leave for the airport.When someone purchases a ticket out of Israel’s flagship airport, their name is run through a database. Their identity is vetted before they ever arrive for their flight.When one does leave for Ben Gurion, security checkpoints may be on the roadway approaching the airport. At these locations, vehicles are checked for explosives and behavioral detection officers may ask the occupants questions, looking for any number of signs indicating nefarious intentions.  When approaching one of these major Middle Eastern terminals, more behavioral detection officers are looking for any physical or behavioral signs inconsistent with the regular traveling process.Any traveler may show signs of nervousness, but how are they walking? Checking if one's pace or gait is consistent with carrying an awkward or heavy hidden object.Are they dressed for the weather? A person wearing a long coat on a hot day in the Middle East is likely to be asked a few questions.These officers are carefully watching passengers eye movements or arm placement. Someone carrying something hidden on around their waist may subconsciously place their arm there.These are just a few examples of the many things security officers at airports not only in the Middle East, but around the world are looking for, hoping to prevent the next devastating attack.The focus in the United States will now be on increasing highly-visible security personnel on the perimeter of the terminals, according to John Cohen, a former acting under-secretary at the Department of Homeland Security and now an ABC News consultant.“These current events demonstrate that we have to look at the threat environment more broadly to include parts of the airport prior to security checkpoint,” Cohen said. “All of these instances show that we need to look at how we can expand security to areas that include entry and exit of the airports.” Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • ABC News(NEW YORK) -- A Tennessee boy used his allowance money and scoured clearance sales to buy books to donate to a local library in hopes the books would “click” with inmates and help them turn their lives around.Tyler Fugett, 9, appeared unannounced at the Montgomery County Sheriff’s Office last week with more than 100 books he wanted to donate to the local jail.The Clarksville, Tenn., fifth-grader had asked his mom, Rebecca Corkren, if she would take him to sales at local book stores so he could use his allowance money to purchase books for inmates to read.“He said, ‘When I’m thinking bad thoughts, I like to read, so I want to collect books for them,’” Corkren told ABC News, adding that Tyler had a family member who spent time in jail.Tyler told his mom he wanted to help the inmates not be bored while behind bars and help them find a new way forward.“He said, ‘If they read, they don’t have time to think about doing bad things when they come out. Maybe they’ll find one thing in there that would make them click to be better people.’”The sheriff's office accepted the donation with open arms.“Our jail library has no budget and there’s no taxpayer money that goes towards it,” said Sandra Brandon, public information officer for the Montgomery County Sheriff’s Office. “We rely 100 percent on donations so when we get anything we’re just very excited.”Tyler and his mom are returning to the sheriff’s office today with another box of donated books. Corkren said Tyler is also now collecting toiletry items to donate to inmates and other people in need.“He has my house looking like a store and I’m like, ‘Whatever floats your boat, son,’ because he’s doing the right thing,” Corkren said. “We live penny to penny and for him to do this, it’s a blessing to see.“I’ve never seen a child with a heart like his.”Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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