• Scott Olson/Getty Images(FLINT, Mich.) — Arthur Woodson and George Grundy II journeyed more than 18 hours from their home in Flint, Michigan, to the protests at Standing Rock in North Dakota by car, hoping to help protect the water on the reservation where the the Sioux Native American tribe lives. When they returned, crossing six states to get there, they brought with them a renewed focus on the battle to protect their own water supply in Flint, as well as a commitment from other veterans to join the fight."I had a beautiful experience and met beautiful people out there," Grundy, a Marine Corps veteran who served in Afghanistan, told ABC News about his experience joining the protests at Standing Rock.Woodson and Gundys said that Veterans for Standing Rock, the group of at least 2,000 U.S. military veterans who arrived in North Dakota amid frigid cold temperatures last weekend to demonstrate against the controversial Dakota Access oil pipeline, immediately saw parallels to the experience of the Native Americans at Standing Rock to the community of Flint, where elevated lead levels were found in the municipal water system last year, creating a health crisis.The announcement Sunday afternoon that the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers would not approve an easement of the proposed Dakota Access Pipeline to cross under Lake Oahe in North Dakota marked a major victory for the Native American tribes and thousands of environmentalists and other activists who have demonstrated in solidarity with their cause. But it did not necessarily signal an end to their struggle. President-elect Donald Trump has voiced support for the completion of the 1,172-mile pipeline, and Energy Transfer Partners, the company behind it, remains eager to proceed with the work.Still, the temporary victory spurred the veterans to start thinking about other injustices to fight.Woodson and Grundy, who were both born and raised in Flint and traveled to Standing Rock along with Jiquanda Johnson, a Flint-based reporter from local news site mlive.com, said that T-shirts they wore to the protests -- bearing slogans like "Flint Lives Matter" and "Dying for a Drink" -- helped steer the conversation among veterans to taking their efforts to Flint.They said that a surplus of bottled water that was donated to Standing Rock protesters could not be used, and will be rerouted to Flint. Moreover, a meeting in Flint is being planned to decide how to incorporate the veterans to help spur action in Flint, Woodson and Grundy noted.Veterans for Standing Rock, who were led by Wesley Clark Jr., the son of retired general and former presidential candidate Wesley Clark, were able to raise over $1 million through a GoFundMe account launched by Clark.Clark told Johnson and mlive.com that the Michigan city would be targeted by the group as a new destination to organize."We don't know when we are going to be there but we will be heading to Flint," Clark Jr. told Johnson in a story for mlive.com. "This problem is all over the county. It's got to be more than veterans. People have been treated wrong in this county for a long time."Woodson, an Army veteran who served in the first Iraq War, said he views the purpose of the burgeoning veteran protest movement in America as being able to "stand up to the elites and the 1 percent.""You have to have money to have respect, and if you don't have respect in America now, you're a nobody. People will step on you," Woodson said, regarding the need for protest.Grundy likened the ongoing crisis in Flint to a toothache, a sharp pain that people learn to live with for long stretches of time.“You can still function but the tooth is always still hurt," he said of Flint. "Mental anguish, physical anguish."He said that America had neglected Flint in a time of need, after the city put its country at the forefront of the automobile industry."I’m living in a area that shows what happens when capitalism doesn’t want you anymore,” he said. "To
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(RENO, Nev.) --  The Nevada high school student who was shot by a resource officer Wednesday was armed with a knife and was threatening others, which prompted the officer to raise his weapon, police said.At a press conference Wednesday night, Reno police said the unidentified student at Hug High School was given a warning to drop the knife, but he did not comply. The Washoe County school officer then shot the teen.Police said the officer provided medical aid to the student until emergency responders arrived. He was then transported to a local hospital, where he is currently in critical condition.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(CHARLESTON, N.C.) --  When Dylann Roof opened fire at a church in Charleston last summer, Felicia Sanders clutched her granddaughter tight and told her to play dead."I muzzled her face to my body so tight," she testified in federal court. "I could feel the warm blood flowing on each side of me.""I was just waiting on my turn," she said. "Even if I got shot, I just didn't want my granddaughter to get shot."  Amidst the chaos and the bloodshed, her youngest son, Tywanza, stood up and confronted the assailant: "Why are you doing this?" he asked, according to Sanders' testimony."And he told our son, 'I have to do this because ya'll raping our women and taking over the world,'" Sanders said. "And that's when [the gunman] put about five bullets in my son."A tearful Sanders then recalled watching her son die."We watched him take his last breath," she said. "I watched my son come into this world, and I watched my son leave this world."Roof, who is white, is accused of fatally shooting nine black parishioners, including Sanders' son, during a Bible study at the predominantly black Emanuel AME Church on June 17, 2015. Sanders and her granddaughter survived without physical injury.Roof, who was 21 at the time, entered the Emanuel AME Church armed and "with the intent of killing African-Americans engaged in the exercise of their religious beliefs," according to the federal indictment against him. The parishioners welcomed Roof into their Bible study group, according to the indictment, after which Roof drew his pistol and opened fire.The 33 federal counts against Roof include hate crimes resulting in death and obstruction of exercise of religion resulting in death.Roof has pleaded not guilty.He also faces a state trial, set for early next year, in which he may also face the death penalty.Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(AMERICUS, Ga.) -- One police officer is dead, and another officer is in critical condition after a shooting near Georgia Southwestern State University today.The officers — one with the local police department and one with the school — were called to a domestic dispute off campus when they encountered the suspect, said Americus Police Chief Mark Scott.Americus Police Officer Nicholas Smarr, 25, was dispatched at 9:40 a.m. to the apartment complex -- at the same time Georgia Southwestern State University Officer Jodi Smith, who responded as backup, Scott said.Gunshots were exchanged between the officers and the suspect, 32-year-old Minguel Kennedy Lembrick, and both officers were shot, Scott said.Smarr died from his injuries, Scott said, while Smith was taken to the hospital in very critical condition, Scott said.Lembrick is still on the loose and is considered to be armed and dangerous, Scott said.Police are unsure if Lembrick is still in the area and are following up on tips on where he may be hiding.The Georgia Southwestern State University campus was placed under lockdown in response to the shooting. People on campus were advised to shelter in place. No students were hurt or endangered, the school said. Suspect still at large. Please remain sheltered in place.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) --  Two juveniles have been charged with aggravated arson in connection with the deadly Tennessee wildfires that have killed 14 people and destroyed or damaged more than 1,700 buildings, according to the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation.The teens were taken into custody this morning and are being held at the Sevier County juvenile detention center, said Sevier County District Attorney Jimmy Dunn. Authorities are looking to see if more charges are possible, Dunn said.They are entitled to have a detention hearing in the next 72 hours, Dunn said. A juvenile court judge will decide if they will be held with bond or without bond. Transferring the teens to adult court is also under consideration, Dunn said.The juveniles' identities were not released. They are not from Sevier County but are residents of Tennessee, Dunn said.Mark Gwyn, director of the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation, offered his condolences to the victims and said the agency is "committed to making sure justice is served with this case."Great Smoky Mountain Superintendent Cassius Cash thanked those who responded to the tip line, saying the "information was critical." More than 130 people have been injured as a direct result of the fires, according to officials. Parts of Great Smoky Mountains National Park, one of the most popular of America's national parks, has been devastated by the fires. Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam called the mountains a "special place" to Tennesseans during a press conference last Friday. Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(CHARLESTON, S.C.) — Dylann Roof, the 22-year-old accused of killing nine people in a Charleston, South Carolina, church, stood over his victims, shooting them over and over again, the prosecution argued this morning at Roof's federal trial.The victims — including the Rev. Clementa Pinckney, a church pastor and a member of the South Carolina Senate — ran for cover, said Assistant U.S. Attorney Jay Richardson, as each magazine was emptied and shell casings tumbled across the parish hall. Then Roof "reloaded ... standing over victims, and he kept shooting and shooting," Richardson said.After the shooting ended, Richardson said, Roof “left behind a scene that nobody can fathom. He walked out calmly, looking both ways … Expecting law enforcement to respond to his horrid attack."Richardson said today — as Roof appeared dressed in prison blues and whites in the packed courtroom — that the government will prove that Roof's "attack was cold and calculated" and was "racist retribution for perceived offenses against the white race."Roof, who is white, is accused of fatally shooting nine black parishioners during a Bible study at the predominantly black Emanuel AME Church on June 17, 2015. Roof, who was 21 at the time, entered the Emanuel AME Church armed and "with the intent of killing African-Americans engaged in the exercise of their religious beliefs," according to the federal indictment against him. The parishioners welcomed Roof into their Bible study group, according to the indictment, after which Roof drew his pistol and opened fire.  Richardson argued that Roof prepared for the attack, stockpiling ammunition and conducting target practice. Richardson told the court Roof called the church four months before the attack and made frequent stops there to check it out. Roof "chose that church because of the impact it had, the manner in which it would resonate across the nation," Richardson said.On that night, as the Bible study came to a close, the parishioners stood to pray, Richardson told the court. "It was at that time that defendant made clear what he had been planning for months," he said. "Instead of a Bible to study, the defendant chose to bring a .45-caliber pistol."Still seated in a chair that Rev. Pinckney had provided for him, he pulled the .45-caliber Glock and shot Rev. Pinckney,” Richardson said. People then ran for cover, but Roof reloaded and kept shooting, Richardson said."As the defendant continued with his assaults, Polly Sheppard could see his boots walking closer and closer to her," Richardson said. Roof allegedly told her he would keep "her alive to tell the story of what he had done," Richardson said.Victim Tywanza Sanders interjected and stood up, even though he had already been shot, and allegedly told Roof that he didn't have to do this, Richardson said.Roof allegedly responded, "Y'all are raping our white women. Y'all are taking over the world," and then shot Tywanza repeatedly, Richardson said.Richardson said in his opening statement that Roof "wrote a manifesto that he wanted to be read around the world," that Roof "claimed white superiority ... His manifesto was a call to arms. A belief that it was not too late take this country back from black Americans."After Roof was arrested, he wanted to continue to share his message and he confessed fully in an interview, Richardson said.He said Roof's two-hour confession was recorded and will be played in court."He admitted that he almost didn't do it, that he almost walked out the door," Richardson said. "But in the end he decided, that he just had to do it."In the video confession, Roof described pacing around the room, shooting victim after victim, Richardson told the court. "He also talked about a call to arms," Richardson said, and hoped that "this would lead to a race war ... that he could send a message to other white people to stand up and do something."Richardson continued: "After mont
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