• Stockbyte/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — A new survey indicates that more than two-thirds of police officers believe that protests that typically follow high-profile police shootings are "motivated to a great extent by anti-police bias" — one of several findings that appear to highlight deep divisions between law enforcement and the citizens they protect.The survey conducted by the National Police Research Platform and published by the Pew Research Center, polled nearly 8,000 police officers from 54 police and sheriff’s departments across the United States.Because of the way the survey was conducted, margins of error varied from question.Some 68 percent of officers say protests after fatal police shootings of black citizens, like the ones that dominated headlines this July following the fatal police shootings of Philando Castile in suburban St. Paul, Minnesota, and Alton Sterling in Baton Rouge, reflect anti-police bias.By contrast, the survey indicates that only 10 percent of the officers believe that protesters were motivated "a great deal" by the desire to hold officers accountable for their actions.Some 86 percent say that high-profile incidents between police and African-Americans have made police work harder, and seven in 10 say they’ve made officers in their department less willing to stop and question “suspicious persons,” the data show.And, perhaps most notably, while six in 10 Americans see these incidents as signs of broader problems between the police and the black community, according to a separate Pew research study, fewer than a third of police officers agree with their assessment.The Pew study also highlights apparent racial divisions within the ranks of the police officers themselves.Only about a quarter of white officers, but close to seven-in-ten of their black colleagues, believe that the protests that followed fatal encounters between police and black citizens were sincere attempts to make police more accountable, the survey said.Furthermore, an overwhelming majority of white officers (92 percent) but less than a third of their black colleagues say that the country has made the changes needed to assure equal rights for black citizens, according to the data.The survey also has some potentially bad news for advocates of police reform.More than half of the officers surveyed said that "in some neighborhoods" being aggressive is a more effective approach than demonstrating courtesy and 44 percent agree or strongly agree that "hard, physical tactics" are needed to deal with certain people.But there are areas of agreement between the police and the public, according to the survey.Large majorities of both believe anti-police bias is part of why police protests occur, the appear to agree on the need for body cameras as well as tracking gun sales federally and making private gun shows subject to background checks.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(ATLANTA) — A Georgia sheriff's deputy is thankful for his life after exchanging fire with a suspect while on a welfare call at a private residence in rural Troup County.The officer's dashcam captured dramatic video of the shootout, which took place on Monday.Deputy Michael Hockett was dispatched to the residence to check on an individual whose father called police to report a mental health episode, ABC affiliate WSB-TV reported.In the video, Hockett is heard yelling at the suspect, “Drop the gun now!”Moments later he’s seen running away as the armed suspect chases him. Hockett jumps a fence and the suspect begins firing at him.Hockett returns fire, hitting the suspect in the shoulder. Hockett was also hit in his forehead, elbow and waist by pellets from a shotgun blast during the shootout.The suspect, identified as Matthew Edmondson, then engaged several local and state law enforcement agencies in a standoff that lasted more than six hours.“I'm thankful that the Lord seen me through it. I've replayed it in my head and I know in my heart that I did everything I could to do the best I could with the situation I'd been placed in,” Hockett told WSB-TV.Edmondson’s mother witnessed part of the shootout and frantically called 911.“I need an ambulance. Please hurry. My son’s been shot,” she said. “There was a deputy here we had just came in. and I don't know if the deputy was shot or not. I don't know what's going on but I'm scared to death."Edmondson eventually surrendered and is now facing several charges, including attempted murder, aggravated assault and false imprisonment.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • Thinkstock/iStock(CLEVELAND) -- The final moments of a small plane that crashed into Lake Erie last month, killing six, were captured on the aircraft's cockpit voice recorder, the National Transportation Safety Board confirmed Wednesday.
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  • Utah County Sheriff's Search and Rescue(Utah County, Utah) -- Mary, an American foxhound, is back home, safe and sound, after surviving several nights perched on the side of a cliff this past weekend in Provo, Utah, according to rescuers.
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  • Thinkstock/Ingram Publishing(Waltham, Mass.) -- Crews responded to a crash Wednesday that left a school bus on its side on Route 95 in Waltham, Massachusetts. State police tweeted that the school bus was involved in a collision with a pickup truck, and rolled over a guardrail.
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  • ABC News(CHARLESTON, S.C.) — Felicia Sanders, the mother of one of the victims killed by Dylann Roof in a Charleston church, told Roof Wednesday morning at his sentencing hearing, "I forgive you.""That's the easiest thing I had to do. But you don't want to help somebody who don't want to help themselves," she told her son's killer, according to ABC affiliate WCIV. "May God have mercy on your soul."Felicia Sanders survived Roof's shooting rampage in June of 2015 that killed nine black parishioners who had gathered at the Charleston, South Carolina, church for Bible study. She was there when her son, Tywanza Sanders, was shot to death."You took my love away from me, and since June 17 I've gotten to know you," Sanders said, according to WCIV. "I know you because you are in my head all day.""I can't hear balloons pop. I can't see the fireworks," she continued. "I cannot shut my eye to pray. I cannot do it because I have to keep my eye open to see those around me."On Tuesday, a jury sentenced Roof, 22, to death after three hours of deliberations. The jury's decision had to be unanimous to sentence him to death.The sentence comes at the end of the federal death penalty case in which he was convicted of hate crimes resulting in death, among other charges. Roof also faces a state trial in which he may again face the death penalty. This is the first time a death penalty verdict was rendered in a federal hate crimes case, the Justice DepartmentBefore the jury began deliberating, Roof told the jury Tuesday in a closing statement, "I still feel like I had to do it."Roof also faces a state trial in which he may again face the death penalty.U.S. Attorney Beth Drake of the District of South Carolina said Tuesday, "Motivated by racist hatred, Dylann Roof murdered and attempted to murder innocent African-American parishioners as they worshiped in the historic Mother Emanuel church.""But, contrary to Roof’s desire to sow the seeds of hate, his acts did not tear this community apart. Instead of agitating racial tensions as he had hoped, Roof’s deadly attack inside Mother Emanuel became an attack on all of us, and the community stood in solidarity. Now, following a trial, the jury has rendered a sentence that underscores the severity of his crimes," Drake said. "We here in the U.S. Attorney’s Office and the Department of Justice want to express our condolences to the victims and their loved ones, and to commend the dedication and hard work by the jury, the law enforcement officers that worked the case, the victim advocate team, and the court to ensure a fair and just process."Roof's family said in a statement, "We will always love Dylann. We will struggle as long as we live to understand why he committed this horrible attack, which caused so much pain to so many good people. We wish to express the grief we feel for the victims of his crimes, and our sympathy to the many families he has hurt. We continue to pray for the Emanuel AME families and the Charleston community."Roof's defense said in a statement that the "sentencing decision means that this case will not be over for a very long time. We are sorry that, despite our best efforts, the legal proceedings have shed so little light on the reasons for this tragedy."Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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