• JayonPhotography/iStock/Thinkstock(TOWNVILLE, S.C) -- Two students and a teacher have been injured in a shooting at a South Carolina elementary school, according to police. The suspected shooter, a teenager, is in custody, police said.A female teacher at Townville Elementary School was taken to AnMed Health Medical Center, according to the Anderson County Sheriff's Office. Two children were also injured and taken to a pediatric hospital, officials said.The extent of their injuries was not clear as was how the victims were hurt.Students from the school were evacuated in the wake of the incident.Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
    Read more...
  • FBI(NEW YORK) -- The FBI has identified the two men seen on surveillance camera taking a suitcase that had held one of the explosive devices that failed to detonate earlier this month in Manhattan, according to law enforcement officials.Authorities had previously said the men were not considered suspects in the attempted bombing and appear to have removed the device from the bag on Manhattan's 27th street in order to lug away the suitcase.The two men are believed to be Egyptian pilots and are presumed to have returned to Egypt, officials said. At this point remain witnesses in the case.Authorities say the men picked up the bag shortly after it was left on 27th street on the evening of Sept. 17 by Ahmad Rahami, an American citizen from Afghanistan. Rahami has been charged with a number of purported crimes related to that bomb, another that exploded on 23rd street the same night and several other devices discovered in New Jersey, most of which failed to detonate. At least 29 people were injured in the 23rd street blast.NYPD chief of counterterrorism James Waters said last week the men who took the bag were "very, very lucky" after perhaps unknowingly handling the explosive device. Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
    Read more...
  • WABC(NEW YORK) --  For the past six years, Ssiller the dog devoted his life to keeping the public safe as an explosives detection canine for the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) at John F. Kennedy International Airport, one of the busiest airports in the world.The 7-year-old black Labrador retriever -- alongside his partner, TSA inspector Christopher Neeson -- worked shifts of more than 10 hours a day at the New York airport, sniffing around its hundreds of acres to flag any signs of possible explosives.But this past Sunday, Ssiller "turned in his badge" after getting a well-deserved retirement, according to a TSA news release.Fittingly, the canine retired the same day of the annual Stephen Siller Tunnel to Towers 5K Run and Walk -- an event commemorating the 9/11 hero he's named after, the TSA said.Firefighter Stephen G. Siller died in the 9/11 attacks while saving people at the Twin Towers.  Neeson and Ssiller the dog started the race on Sunday, which followed Siller's footsteps from the Hugh L. Carey Tunnel to the World Trade Center site on Sept. 11, 2001, according to the TSA.The pair were also honored that day with a plaque that recognized Ssiller's "immeasurable contributions, untiring spirit and faithful service to the mission of protecting our nation’s transportation systems and dedicated service to our country."Neeson has since adopted Ssiller as a pet, and the canine is now spending his days at home "just being a dog," the TSA said."I'm going to have to ween him down and then try and give him a new purpose," Neeson told ABC station WABC.Ssiller may become a therapy dog in the future, Neeson added. But for now, the pup is just catching up on some well-deserved rest.
    Read more...
  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Former college soccer coach Oral "Nick" Hillary was found not guilty Wednesday in the murder of Garrett Phillips, the 12-year-old son of his ex-girlfriend.The decision was made by Judge Felix Catena. Hillary waived his right to a jury trial and requested a bench trial.Garrett's younger brother, Aaron Collins, burst into tears after the judge announced his decision, and Garrett's mother, Tandy Cyrus, cried softly. Hillary embraced his attorneys and left the courtroom shortly after the decision was announced.First responders took two stretchers to the courthouse after the verdict to assist distressed family members, including Garrett's cousin Kayla Phillips, who is believed to be one of the last people who saw him alive. Kayla, who appeared distraught, was then escorted down the courthouse steps and to a waiting car.  Garrett had just begun the sixth grade when he was found unresponsive in his Potsdam home in October 2011. Cyrus had dated Hillary for about one year, and the two broke up months before Garrett's death.Hillary was arrested several years after Garrett's death, and the case went to trial this September in Canton, New York, a town about 10 miles from Potsdam.Hillary told ABC News' Elizabeth Vargas earlier this year, before the trial began, that he's innocent.  "I have absolutely nothing to do with what has happened to Garrett," Hillary said. "Why would I even want to hurt a child, after having worked with kids for over two decades? It just blows my mind."Hillary, a father of five, was smiling and laughing with his lawyers before the verdict was read. Afterward, he cried tears of happiness.As he prepared for trial, Hillary told Vargas earlier this year that he tried to keep his children "in as much as a normal setting, but obviously it’s impossible.""The one good thing to always hear [was my teenage daughter] Shanna come home and say, 'You know, Dad, you know, all my friends who know who you are, who have been to the house, who have interacted with you, they are very supportive of you.'"Hillary said he had to sit down with his children "and let them know, 'Look, your dad has absolutely nothing to do with the death of Garrett Phillips' ... My kids look back at me and [say], 'Dad, we know that’s not who you are.'" This story is developing. Check back for updates.Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
    Read more...
  • ABC News(NEW YORK) — The father of New York and New Jersey bombing suspect Ahmad Rahami told ABC News that his wife and one of his other sons have been detained in Afghanistan, after being pulled off a flight in Dubai and questioned for 16 hours by authorities there.In his first in-depth broadcast interview, Mohammad Rahami said his wife, Najiba, and son, Qassim, were trying to return to the U.S. when they were held in the United Arab Emirates and eventually sent to Kabul."Why send my son back to Afghanistan? He is a U.S. citizen. You have any questions? Bring him home, [don't] send him to a different country," Mohammad Rahami said of Qassim.The elder Rahami denied that anyone in his family, including Qassim, had anything to do with Ahmad's alleged bombings in New York and New Jersey on Sept. 17 that injured 29 people.Mohammad Rahami, whose family is originally from Afghanistan but lived in New Jersey, said that he hadn't spoken with Ahmad since a falling out in May. But he knew that in the months before the attack, his son had become secretive, changed the lock on his bedroom door and became extremely angry when a young relative once tried to enter without permission.Ahmad's wife left the U.S. in June -- for dental work in Afghanistan, according to Mohammad -- and that's when a criminal complaint says Ahmad began buying bomb components. Mohammad said that also appears to be when Ahmad started to grow out his beard."He did everything by himself. He buy everything by himself -- order, online, he did [it] by himself," Mohammad said.After the bombing, Mohammad said it was the FBI that told him his son was the suspect.Though Mohammad said he was "shocked" at the news, he also responded by telling agents, "This is [a] stupid son."In light of the bombing, Mohammad described Ahmad as "not a human being... not a Muslim.""If you're Muslim, you respect your father. If you're Muslim, you respect religion. If you're Muslim, you respect your country," Mohammad said.Mohammad said that as far back as 2011 he was concerned his son may have fallen in with the "wrong kind of people" during a trip to Pakistan. Mohammad said his brother, who lived in Pakistan, warned him about suspicious characters Ahmad may have been in contact with, but neither Mohammad nor his brother knew exactly who the people were.When Ahmad was back in the U.S. the next year, Mohammad said he caught him watching disturbing jihadist videos online. Mohammad kicked him out over it."I said, 'Listen, if you watch this video in my home, please leave my house,'" Mohammad said.A U.S. official previously told ABC News that Ahmad returned to Pakistan and Afghanistan in 2013 and stayed for nearly a year before coming back to the U.S. in 2014.It was after his return in 2014 that Mohammad called the FBI on his son after a domestic dispute. Mohammad said he told federal agents they needed to "watch this guy" and that Ahmad was "not a normal person."The FBI said last week they looked into Ahmad at the time and found no terror ties. Law enforcement officials also alleged that Mohammad had called the FBI back and recanted some of his statements about Ahmad.In the interview with ABC News Tuesday, Mohammad said that's not true and that he never recanted."No. It's 100 percent wrong," Mohammad said. "They [did] not do their job."Mohammad said FBI agents were the ones to tell him that Ahmad was not a terrorist in 2014. "I said, 'Thank you, God, that's very good,'" Mohammad said.Coincidentally, Mohammad said the FBI agent with whom he interacted in 2014 was present when Ahmad was shot and captured last week.Just hours before Mohammad's interview with ABC News Tuesday, FBI Director James Comey responded to a question in a Senate committee hearing about Mohammad allegedly telling the FBI that Ahmad was a "terrorist" by saying that those "facts are wrong about what [Ahmad's] father told the FBI.""But there as well, we will go back and scrub our prior contact with that matter very, very carefu
    Read more...
  • iStock/Thinkstock(SANTA CLARA, Calif.) — Heat and dry conditions are stoking a fast-moving wildfire in California that has burned more than 2,000 acres in just over a day, at times sending flames shooting 100 feet up into the air.Evacuations remained underway for hundreds of residents near California's Santa Cruz Mountains Tuesday as firefighters continued to battle the blaze.The fire, which started Monday around 3 p.m., had scorched more than 2,250 acres and was 10 percent contained, according to the Cal Fire Santa Clara Unit.At least one home has been destroyed and another damaged, in addition to at least six smaller structures."We grabbed a few days' worth of clothes and that's all we've got," resident Mike Cecere said.Record-breaking, triple-digit heat in addition to California's drought helped fuel the blaze, driving it from just a spark to more than 3.5 square miles of scorched land in barely more than 24 hours. More than 500 firefighters were working around the clock to contain it."After dark, as we're fighting fire in unfamiliar terrain -- with obviously dangers of the fire itself and the movement of the fire -- it definitely presents a considerable amount of danger to us, you know, besides just that firefighting aspect," Capt. Christopher Salcido told ABC News affiliate ABC7 News in San Francisco.Cal Fire said that 300 structures were threatened, and announced mandatory evacuations for several nearby communities. The National Weather Service radar station was forced to shutter after flames started lapping near the building.One firefighter was reportedly injured and Cal Fire said that one home had been destroyed in addition to a structure."I'm a little nervous," Mary Lindsay told SFGate.com. "I can see all the smoke billowing up from the fire."The fire's cause remained under investigation.Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
    Read more...