• Ted Soqui/Corbis via Getty Images(LOS ANGELES) -- John Martin, a retired ABC News national correspondent, is a public policy fellow at the Woodrow Wilson Center for International Scholars in Washington, D.C. This is his first-person essay written for ABC News reflecting on his experiences covering the 1992 Los Angeles riots:On that morning 25 years ago, smoke still hung in the air from the looting and fires the day before, but it seemed the nighttime curfew had worked. Streets were largely deserted, boulevards eerily quiet.The big white stock exchange building was open but almost nobody came to trade. Universities were closed, USC postponed final exams. Workers stayed home.As an ABC News national correspondent walking the streets with a camera crew, I spent 10 days looking for signs of revival and hope. At first, I didn’t see many.“I don’t believe it had anything to do with Rodney King,” said a black woman in front of her looted shop. “I think it had to do with people’s greed.”At a post office, hundreds of people lined up for Social Security checks and monthly welfare assistance.“These are not the people who bombed and looted and destroyed the stores,” said a 20-ish black woman in a bright orange jersey. “These people,” she said, “want get their money.”Meanwhile National Guard troops began streaming off buses. The mayor seemed relieved. “We are going to insure the safety of this city,” said Tom Bradley, a black man and former police officer. “And we are going to take back the streets.”But what would Los Angeles do with its streets? There were 10,000 looted and burned businesses, at least 200 families homeless, food shelves empty, banks littered with ashes, a doctor’s office choked with debris.“The evil act is done,” said Dr. Gerald Fradkoff, an internist who devoted his practice to the aged poor and low-income immigrants.Dropping his singed paper records into a brown cardboard box, the doctor said he would try to renegotiate a low-interest loan from the Small Business Administration.“I have to heal, the city has to heal, and we have to come back together.”Then, suddenly, it started, we began to see a remarkable amount of effort. It was heartening.In Hollywood, volunteers streamed along the sidewalks and in passing trucks, helping wherever they were needed to sweep and clean.In South Central, merchants opened a makeshift store in the parking lot of a burned out supermarket, calling it “Rebuilding Starts Now.”In the city center, 14 architects and lawyers met to plan ways to construct small shopping districts in riot areas to provide food and retail services.“The immediate solution we’ve come up with is temporary structures that will have a lifespan of perhaps one year,” said Roland Wiley, a young black architect.But they needed city building permits and faced a bureaucratic maze.A white-haired white lawyer, Richard Riordan, had a solution:“If you go to them with a concept you will get jerked around for a year or so,” said Riordan. “Go in with a set plan. I will guarantee you…we’ll get that through within a few days.”The plan worked. (So did Riordan’s get-it-done attitude. A year later, he was elected mayor).Meanwhile, a giant drugstore chain offered more hope.Even though it had 19 stores looted and four burned to the ground, a Thrifty executive promised the firm would not abandon the stores that were looted.Still, there was plenty of despair.Richard Kim, owner of a family electronics business, found that looters had stolen 20 percent of his audio equipment and television sets. Fire had destroyed a million dollars of his inventory.“We’re already leveraged out like a lot of businesses in the area,” he said, “We cannot take out any more loans. If the insurance does not cover it, we cannot rebuild.”An
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  • pikepicture/iStock/Thinkstock(MIDDLETOWN, De.) -- The 26-year-old suspect who allegedly shot and killed a Delaware state trooper on Wednesday chased the officer before gunning him down, police said.The suspect, identified as Burgon Sealy, allegedly shot 32-year-old Cpl. Stephen Ballard, and then fled to his home, where he held a 20-hour standoff with police. He was later shot and killed by police after he emerged carrying a weapon, ABC affiliate WPVI reported.Here is a timeline of how the standoff unfolded:WednesdayAround 10 a.m.Ballard observed what police described as a suspicious vehicle in the parking lot of a Wawa convenience store in Bear, Delaware on the Pulaski Highway. In a press conference Thursday, state police said that they think Ballard "had a reason to stop" the red Dodge Charger and that it could have been "drug involvement."The trooper, dressed in full uniform, made contact with both the driver and the passenger, who showed their IDs, police said. When Ballard walked to the passenger side of the car, he asked Sealy to step out of the vehicle, and a struggle ensued.Sealy allegedly removed a firearm from his waistband and pursued Ballard in the parking lot. Ballard tried to take cover behind a parked vehicle, but when he fell, Sealy allegedly fired several rounds at him, striking him.The driver of the car stayed on the scene until more troopers arrived and was taken into custody without incident. He was later released.Ballard was treated on the scene and transported to a local hospital.Around 3 p.m.All schools in the Appoquinimink School District in the Middletown, Delaware area are placed on lockdown amid the search for Sealy.Around 4:45 p.m.State police announce at a press conference that Ballard has succumbed to his injuries and that Sealy had barricaded himself in his home on St. Michaels Drive in the Brick Mill Farm development.After he fled, Sealy had contacted family members to inform them that he had shot the trooper, police said. The family members then contacted law enforcement, who traced Sealy to his home.Sealy fired several rounds at police officers. Residents in the area were evacuated due to the gunfire.Hostage negotiators on the scene attempted to get information from the suspect and to obtain a "peaceful resolution," police said.7:32 p.m.Delaware Gov. John Carney announced that U.S. and state flags will be flown at half-staff in Ballard's honor.8:22 p.m.Sealy stopped making contact with police on the scene, who set up an explosive charge on the residence. Authorities did not enter the home but continued attempts to make contact with Sealy to persuade him to surrender.9:35 p.m.Police identify Ballard as the trooper who was killed. He was an eight-year veteran of the Delaware State Police, police said.Thursday4 a.m.Sealy allegedly began firing at officers again, and authorities continued to try to negotiate with him. The Odessa Fire Company had opened its facility to temporarily house the residents in the area who had been evacuated.9:17 a.m.Sealy exited the home with a weapon, according to officials. He was then shot by law enforcement.9:29 a.m.Sealy is pronounced dead on the scene. About 25 minutes later, police confirm to ABC News that the standoff is over.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • Lulu & Leo Fund(NEW YORK) -- The parents of two children allegedly killed by their nanny inside their New York City home in 2012 have penned new essays opening up about their grief and their journey to recovery.Marina Krim, who walked in the family's Upper West Side apartment on that otherwise ordinary afternoon to find her children Lulu, 6, and Leo, 2, dead in a bathtub, said that in the weeks following Lulu and Leo's deaths, she noticed “magical things happened," describing her senses as “being awakened.”3 takeaways from Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg's new book on grief, 'Option B'“I noticed a piece of street art on a construction site -- a stencil of a young boy holding a sign filled with colorful hearts. I instantly connected him to Leo,” Krim wrote in her new essay. “I felt that maybe the universe was trying to tell me something, that it was helping me to realize that there was a beautiful 'new' relationship waiting to be developed with Lulu and Leo.”Krim was coming home from taking her then-3-year-old daughter, Nessie, to a swim class when she discovered her other children dead. Their nanny, Yoselyn Ortega, was charged with their murders and is awaiting trial. She has pleaded not guilty. Her next scheduled court appearance is May 18.Ortega, a naturalized U.S. citizen who was born in the Dominican Republic, worked for the Krim family for two years and had been referred to them by another family, New York Police Department officials said at a 2012 press conference.Krim’s husband, Kevin Krim, wrote in a separate essay that it was Nessie, now 8, who helped him move forward in the immediate aftermath of Lulu and Leo’s deaths.“When you wake up the first morning to a new and terrible world, what do you do? I didn’t feel like I’d ever want to do anything ever again,” Kevin Krim wrote. “But then little Nessie, our surviving child who was not yet 4 years old, looked at me and said, 'Daddy, I’m hungry.' And I knew I had to take care of her and Marina.”The Krims wrote the essays for Option B, a website on adversity and resilience started by Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg, whose husband, Dave Goldberg, died unexpectedly in 2015. The website takes its name from a new book on grief written by Sandberg and psychologist Adam Grant."Expressions of creativity continue to help us heal, rebuild, and thrive. In part, writing our stories for Option B was a natural way for us to not only remember Lulu and Leo and talk about Choose Creativity, but also help others survive and thrive in the face of adversity," the Krims said in a statement to ABC News. "We would have been happy to help simply because Sheryl and Adam are kind, thoughtful, and generous people and friends. We are also grateful to contribute to a well-researched and written book about the subjects we are asked about so often. It's a critical resource that everyone should read."Marina Krim described other instances -- including hearing the theme song from “Peanuts” and receiving, with Nessie, a compliment from a stranger -- as being signs from Lulu and Leo.“They showed me that there was still a way to connect with them,” she wrote. “It was an approach inspired by who they were and what they loved. It required creativity, always an important influence in my life.”Marina Krim also explained why, on the first Mother's Day after her children's death, she decorated a wall in the family’s apartment with sand dollars she and Lulu had collected together from the beach on the first Mother’s Day after her children’s death.“It was a simple way to express myself, feel present, and connect with Lulu and Leo on a really tough day,” she wrote.The Krims have since had two more children, Felix, 3, and Linus, 1, and returned to New York City after embarking on a cross-country trip with Nessie in an RV.Kevin Krim described the couple’s t
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  • napatcha/iStock/Thinkstock(FRESNO, Ca.) -- Kori Ali Muhammad was charged Wednesday with three counts of first-degree murder in what prosecutors have described as a racially motivated shooting spree.Muhammad, 39, is accused of going on a rampage that left three people dead in downtown Fresno, California, on April 18. His arraignment on the three murders, which was scheduled for today, has been delayed until May 12 for a psychological evaluation, according to ABC-owned station KFSN-TVProsecutors said Muhammad was also charged Wednesday with three counts of attempted murder for the individuals he shot at but didn't hit, one count of shooting at an occupied vehicle and one count of possession of a firearm, according to a press release from the Fresno County District Attorney's Office.According to ABC-owned station KGO-TV, police said Muhammad told investigators he wanted to kill as many white people as possible, laughing as he explained his actions."Kori Muhammad is not a terrorist, but he is a racist," Fresno Police Dept. Chief Jerry Dyer said, KGO-TV reported.The victims of the April 18 shooting rampage have been identified as 37-year-old Mark Gassett, 34-year-old Zackary Randalls and 58-year-old David Jackson.Muhammad is separately charged in the murder of a security guard outside a motel on April 13, as well as the attempted murder of another security guard that same day. He fled the scene afterward, police said. Once Muhammad learned he was wanted for murder, he told investigators, he decided to go on the April 18 shooting spree.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • ABC News(SAN DIEGO) -- SeaWorld San Diego welcomed an unexpected furry addition early Wednesday morning after rescue teams took in the sea lion pup's sick mother Tuesday afternoon.Kevin Robinson, a member of SeaWorld's animal care team, and Dr. Kelsey Herrick, a SeaWorld veterinarian, showed off the sea lion pup on Facebook Live just hours after her birth.When the team of doctors arrived Wednesday morning to check on the sea lion they rescued in Oceanside, they discovered a new addition in the pen where they'd left her."This little gem was just hanging out in the pen with mom," Robinson said. "Right now because the mom is so sick she's not doing a great job of being a mom, she's just very tired and not attentive to the care of this animal."Doctors took x-rays, and examined the pup's heart and lungs.In an interview with ABC News, SeaWorld's Director of Communications David Koontz said the infant sea lion was born a couple weeks premature and is about 10 pounds, which he said is a good size for her condition.Koontz confirmed that the mother sea lion exhibited symptoms of domoic acid toxicity, an ocean algae bloom that creates a neurological toxin, which can be treated with lots of hydration."She was lethargic and had poor motor skills upon initial assessment," Koontz said of the mother. "It's still early in the process, but our team is to trying to get the toxicity flushed out with lots of hydration."Until the mother's health improves, the team will act as the pup's caregiver to keep her warm, hydrated and fed. Using a special stomach tube, they feed her sea lion baby milk formula and electrolytes that will give the pup energy and hydration. Overall, the pup has shown improved signs of energy with care and the team is hopeful that the mother could get better in a few days."Our goal is to help get mom healthy so that we have the opportunity to get mom and her pup back together," Koontz said.The pair will bond once the mom regains her health and she will raise the pup from that point on.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • artolympic/iStock/Thinkstock(MIDDLETOWN, Del.) -- The suspect in Wednesday's fatal shooting of a Delaware state trooper was shot and killed Thursday after an hours-long standoff with authorities, according to the Delaware State Police.Various police agencies had surrounded the evacuated area in Middletown where the suspect barricaded himself in a residence on St. Michaels Drive in the Brick Mill Farm development.Earlier Thursday morning, authorities managed to breach numerous windows with explosives but had not yet entered the home. Officers were attempting to make contact with the suspect and were continuing to attempt to persuade him to surrender, state police said.The armed suspect, believed to have been inside the residence alone, fired more rounds on authorities Thursday around 4 a.m. ET, according to state police. There were no reported injuries.The suspect exited the residence at 9:17 a.m. ET and "engaged police," officials said. He was then shot by law enforcement and pronounced dead at the scene at 9:29 a.m. ET, state police said.Residents in the area remain evacuated. The Odessa Fire Company has opened its facility to temporarily house the evacuated residents.The standoff stemmed from Wednesday's shooting that claimed the life of Cpl. Stephen Ballard, an eight-year veteran of the Delaware State Police.Around 10 a.m. ET Wednesday, Ballard observed a vehicle in the parking lot of a Wawa convenience store in Bear, Delaware. When the trooper made contact with its occupants, a struggle ensued, state police said.One of the two unnamed suspects then exited the vehicle and fired several rounds at the trooper, striking him. Ballard, 32, was treated at the scene and transported to a hospital, where he later died from his injuries, according to state police.The investigation into the fatal shooting is ongoing.One of the suspects was taken into custody without incident. The second suspect fled on foot before additional troopers arrived and had since barricaded himself in the residence, state police said.The suspect refused orders to surrender while continuing to fire at police officers.
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