• iStock/Thinkstock(ROTHSCHILD, Wis.) — Four people including a police officer were killed in Wisconsin Wednesday after a domestic dispute escalated into shootings at three different locations — a bank, a law firm and an apartment complex — and a dramatic standoff between police and the suspect, officials said.The suspect is in custody, police said.Around 12:30 p.m., police responded to a "domestic situation" at Marathon Savings Bank in Rothschild. When they arrived, police discovered two people had been shot. The suspect was not there.Police then received a call about 10 minutes later from the law firm Tlusty, Kennedy and Dirks in nearby Schofield, where the suspect killed one person.Then at 1:30, another person was killed at an apartment complex in Weston, where the suspect had barricaded himself in an apartment.After a few hours of negotiations, there was an exchange of gunfire. The suspect was injured and transported to local hospital in an unknown condition.Nearby schools and a hospital went on lockdown. The lockdowns were later lifted.At some point during the events, an officer with the Everest Metro Police Department was fatally shot. Everest Metro is a small, 27-officer force that serves Schofield and Weston.Police did not provide any further details about the office, nor the other victims or suspect.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- The fatal stabbing of a 66-year-old man in New York City Monday night is being investigated as a bias crime, according to police.Authorities said they have a 28-year-old suspect from Maryland in custody. They said they believed that the man had traveled to New York City to attack and kill black people.According to police, the suspect has a deep-seated hatred against black people."He came here to target male blacks," Assistant Chief Bill Aubrey said Wednesday during a news conference. "[He] picked New York because it's the media capital of the world. ... He knew what he was doing coming up here."Police identified the suspect as James Harris Jackson. Aubrey said he came from Maryland on Friday via a BoltBus.Police said he assaulted Timothy Kaufman, 66, a black man. Jackson is white.Police said the suspect walked into a police substation in Times Square a little after midnight. Two knives were found in his possession, police said. Authorities said he was being questioned.The victim was stabbed in the chest and back at Ninth Avenue and West 36th Street just before 11:30 p.m. Monday.Police said that the victim walked more than a block to a police precinct before collapsing. He was pronounced dead at Bellevue Hospital.
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  • The Tennessee Bureau of Investigation(NEW YORK) -- A former Tennessee teacher accused of kidnapping his 15-year-old student is believed to have watched a TV show about living off the grid before the pair disappeared, law enforcement sources told ABC News.Tad Cummins, 50, is accused of kidnapping Elizabeth Thomas on March 13. As the manhunt intensifies, officials say there have been no credible sightings of the duo. Tennessee Bureau of Investigation spokesman Josh DeVine told ABC News that if the duo isn’t outside the Southeast, they are likely "off the grid" in a rural area.Three days before the alleged kidnapping, Cummins did online research about his car "to determine if certain features could be tracked by law enforcement," the TBI said Tuesday.He also researched if his SUV was suitable for camping, law enforcement officials said.Cummins, a married father and grandfather, researched teen marriage online as well, specifically the age of consent, according to law enforcement officials.The TBI said that Cummins, who was fired one day after the alleged kidnapping, "may have been abusing his role as a teacher to groom [the teen] ... in an effort to lure and potentially sexually exploit her."One of Thomas' schoolmates had reported seeing Thomas and Cummins kiss in his classroom on Jan. 23, according to a school district investigative report, but Thomas and Cummins denied the claim.Thomas' sister told ABC News that the 15-year-old was bullied in school by students and teachers after the reported kiss and told her "I just have to get away, we have to get away.""I can't handle this anymore . .. all the teachers, all the kids constantly saying mean things, I can't handle it,’" the sister said.Cummins is wanted on allegations of aggravated kidnapping and sexual contact with a minor. An Amber Alert has been issued for Thomas.Authorities say Cummins is believed to be armed and that the teen is "in imminent danger."Authorities said neither Thomas nor Cummins has been in touch with family members.Cummins' wife, Jill, pleaded with her husband Friday to "come home."
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  • Purestock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — U.S. authorities became convinced that security measures for certain U.S.-bound flights needed to be boosted only after conducting a series of tests to determine the credibility of new intelligence indicating that ISIS associates were trying to develop explosives-laden electronics that could be smuggled onboard planes, ABC News has learned.The tests were executed in recent weeks and led authorities to one conclusion: "It can be done," as one source put it.The Department of Homeland Security ultimately banned all electronics bigger than a cellphone from the cabins of some direct flights to the United States from 10 airports in eight Muslim-majority countries.Sources said that the airports affected by the restrictions were not directly named in the most recent threat intelligence gathered by authorities, but those airports were identified through intelligence analysis paired with other government information.In an interview with ABC News, Rep. Eric Swalwell, D-California, a member of the House Intelligence Committee, warned about the "new aviation threat.""We know that our adversaries, terrorist groups in the United States and outside the United States, seek to bring down a U.S.-bound airliner. That’s one of their highest value targets. And we’re doing everything we can right now to prevent that from happening," Swalwell said Tuesday.Nearly two years ago, ABC News first reported that an internal investigation of the Transportation Security Administration revealed security failures at dozens of major U.S. airports. Undercover investigators were able to smuggle mock explosives or banned weapons through checkpoints in 95 percent of trials, ABC News reported. The series of tests were conducted by Homeland Security Red Teams who pose as passengers, setting out to beat the system.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(CHINO, Calif.) — A Southern California high school student was taken into custody on Tuesday for allegedly threatening to carry out a Columbine-style shooting attack.The 15-year-old Chino High School student from Ontario allegedly made the threats via Twitter, ABC affiliate KABC reported Tuesday, citing the Chino Police Department.The teenager, whose identity was withheld, allegedly tweeted, "I'm recreating Columbine" and "Chino needs a good shooting," according to a group known as "The Tactical Institute," who saw the messages and reported them to police, the report said.The comments refer to the 1999 shooting massacre at Columbine High School in Colorado where two students killed 13 people before taking their own lives. The shooting is the deadliest school massacre in U.S. history.The student is currently being held at a juvenile facility in San Bernardino on suspicion of criminal threats, according to KABC. Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • Stockbyte/Thinkstock(LOS ANGELES) — The head of the Los Angeles Police Department on Tuesday warned of a "strong correlation" between dramatic drops in violent crimes being reported by Hispanics in Los Angeles and fears of being deported, suggesting that the community may be avoiding contact with local law enforcement in the wake of immigration polices favored by the Trump administration.Newly-released LAPD crime statistics for 2017 show that among Hispanics, reports of rape have dropped 25 percent while those of spousal abuse have decreased by 9.8 percent. Similar reductions from the start of this year were not found in any other ethnic group, according to the LAPD numbers."Imagine your sister, your mother, not reporting a sexual assault for fear that their family will be torn apart," Los Angeles Police Chief Charlie Beck told reporters on Tuesday.With a large Hispanic population, Los Angeles has been one of several large U.S. municipalities to have resisted new federal immigration policies under President Trump, who has promised to toughen laws against the estimated 11 million immigrants living illegally in the U.S.Police in California's largest cities have long warned of the difficulties of local officials enforcing federal immigration laws, partly because such enforcement could drive large immigrant populations into hiding and be fearful of reporting crimes, which could result in higher crime rates overall.Speaking Tuesday, Beck said that immigrant populations should not have to fear the police."In L.A. we don't care what color your skin is, where your parents come from or what language you speak," he said. "We are your police department."In February, Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti and other city leaders sent Immigration and Customs Enforcement a letter asking that federal immigration agents stop identifying themselves as "police" while going after undocumented immigrants. They argued the practice makes the immigrant population fearful of police and potentially afraid to report crimes due to deportation fears if exposed as illegal immigrants. The authorities said in some cases a victim might be legal but be worried that calling the police could lead to a loved one being deported.For its part, ICE has argued it uses "police" because it’s an internationally recognized term for law enforcement understood in any language.The LAPD has long had a policy of not asking about the immigration status of individuals who come into contact with its officers.On Tuesday, Garcetti signed an executive directive expanding that policy to Los Angeles Airport Police, Harbor Police and the Los Angeles Fire Department."We believe that many local families are keeping their kids home or backing off of engaging with our law enforcement officials and our public safety officials because they're afraid of what they believe could happen," said Garcetti.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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