• Tim Vorderstrasse(WASHINGTON) -- A new mother of two decided to take a fresh approach on pregnancy posts by showing the honest and sometimes humorous side of what it's really like to be pregnant.Exactly two months after the birth of her first daughter, Zoey, Maya Vorderstrasse found out she was pregnant with another baby girl. "I was in absolute shock," Vorderstrasse told ABC News.But the new mother took it in stride and started posting pictures on Instagram of her new baby bump."Up until about halfway through the pregnancy I was still taking pretty pictures, but I would try and insert a relatable caption," she said of her initial idea to flip the switch on her typical mommy-to-be posts. "But then it came to a point where I said, 'I'm way too tired and hurting. I can't pretend it's this amazing feeling all the time.' It's hard, I was achy and I had my other child crawling and I felt [like a] fake portraying something that just wasn't my reality.”So she decided to instead embrace the reality of it all and post things to which other pregnant women could actually relate."I said, 'I'm going to embrace my life right now and see what happens, see how people respond.’"Vorderstrasse used a plain and simple letter board to post messages about how she was feeling week to week."I was paying attention to my symptoms and then took the strongest one and turned it into a board," she explained. "I translated how I was feeling into a message."Her husband, Tim, who photographed her series of shots, became the brunt of one post at 33 weeks when she got upset because he ate the last cookie out of a package of cookies."When my first one went viral and got over 6,000 ‘likes,’ the one where I'm [fake] choking my husband because he took my food, that was the one that made me realize how much people like these and could relate," Vorderstrasse said. "People were messaging me saying, 'Oh, my gosh, that's exactly how I feel. Thank you for being so honest about that.' They feel like it's OK to not have it all together and these other moms felt like they belonged somewhere reading my posts."Ultimately, the pregnancy shots finished with the Aug. 3 birth of daughter Hazel but she still plans to continue posting pics that are both fun and honest.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • ABC News.(ST. JOSEPH, Mo.) -- Newlyweds Samantha and Cameron Kuhn had an out-of-this-world wedding today during the total solar eclipse. They celebrated with their closest friends and family in the path of totality in St. Joseph, Missouri.“Being able to do the wedding on the day of the solar eclipse couldn’t be any more perfect,” bride Samantha Kuhn, 28, told ABC News.After completing their vows, the bride and groom joined their guests, all wearing certified solar eclipse glasses, in a field behind the altar to take in another “rare and wonderful” occasion -- the total solar eclipse.“I’ll go out and have about 2 minutes and 40 seconds of totality and just take in that moment,” the bride said on “Good Morning America” this morning in anticipation of the ceremony. “It’s going to be amazing.”The astronomy-loving bride has been obsessed with all things celestial since she was in the third grade, even wanting to become an astronaut.“Once I realized the planets were out there and we were all suspended in this solar system, I couldn’t wrap my head around it but I loved that. It completely fascinated me,” she told ABC News.So when her now-husband Cameron Kuhn popped the question, picking the day was a no brainer.“The coolest part about this, the eclipse is kind of like a time stamp,” the groom said. “It will stand out in everybody’s memories even more.”The wedding had heavenly touches and an outer space motif including DIY “galaxy globe” centerpieces -- similar to snow globes, but full of glitter instead -- for the reception tables.While the wedding party waited for the total eclipse to happen, they listened to instrumental music that “kind of sounds space soundtrack-y,” said the bride.She also sported a magical braid to show off her galaxy-colored hair of blue and fuchsia hues.And she couldn’t walk down the aisle without her space-themed high heels, also planning ahead with matching lace-up flats to dance the night away at the reception.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- From Oregon to South Carolina, a total solar eclipse on Monday will darken the sky as it arcs across the contiguous United States.A total solar eclipse is when the moon moves between the sun and Earth, an occurrence that lasts up to three hours from beginning to end. Monday's total solar eclipse is particularly rare because it's the first time in 99 years that the path of totality exclusively crosses the continental United States from coast to coast. It's also the first continent-wide eclipse to be visible only from the United States since 1776.The last time the contiguous United States saw a total solar eclipse was Feb. 26, 1979, when the path of totality crossed the Pacific Northwest. ABC News' Frank Reynolds anchored a special report on the celestial phenomenon at the time and pledged that the network would cover the next total solar eclipse in 2017."So that's it -- the last solar eclipse to be seen on this continent in this century. And as I said not until Aug. 21, 2017, will another eclipse be visible from North America. That's 38 years from now. May the shadow of the moon fall on a world in peace. ABC News, of course, will bring you a complete report on that next eclipse 38 years from now,"  Reynolds said before signing off.On Monday, starting at 10 a.m. PT/1 p.m. ET, ABC News' David Muir will lead the network's live coverage of the astronomical event from within the path of totality.You must be in the path of totality to witness a total solar eclipse. NASA estimates more than 300 million people in the United States could potentially view the total solar eclipse in its entirety.However, a partial solar eclipse will be visible in every U.S. state. In fact, everyone in North America, as well as parts of South America, Africa and Europe, will see at least a partial eclipse, according to NASA.The path of totality for the Aug. 21 solar eclipse is a 70-mile-wide ribbon that will cross the United States from west to east, sweeping over portions of 14 U.S. states: Oregon, Idaho, Wyoming, Montana, Nebraska, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Illinois, Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia, North Carolina and South Carolina.The moon's shadow will start to eclipse the sun over the West Coast just after 9 a.m. PT. From there, the moon's shadow will speed across the country and leave the East Coast just after 4 p.m. ET.The exact times for partial and total phases of Monday's eclipse vary depending on your location.With millions of people expected to pour into the select U.S. cities located within the path of totality, law enforcement, emergency personnel and hospitals there are on high alert."It's all hands on deck," Kentucky's Madisonville Police Chief Wade Williams told ABC News. "We're kind of throwing everything at it."The state of Oregon alone is anticipating a million visitors Monday, causing some local hospitals to cancel elective surgeries and call in extra help for the emergency rooms. Some cities even preemptively declared a state of disaster, a move that allows them to call in the National Guard to help direct the large crowds if needed."If a police department in a certain area is overwhelmed and they need us to help come and set up traffic control check points, we're ready to do that," Oregon National Guard spokesperson Leslie Reed told ABC News.More than than 17,000 cars and SUVs have already been rented for Monday at Oregon's Portland International Airport, a number it normally hits over an entire week.In northeast Georgia, the mountain town of Blairsville is expecting to host up to 200 percent more people than the number of residents who live there. The town's hotels are fully booked and camping sites are sold out."There is no reason to panic," Blairsville-Union County Chamber of Commerce tourism director Tobie Chandler told ABC News. "We are not going to run out of gas, we are not going to run out of groceries. We just need to enjoy this event."The American Red Cross has set up resources along the path
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  • ABC News.(GREENVILLE, S.C.) -- A baby girl born today in South Carolina, hours before the total solar eclipse, has been legally named Eclipse.Eclipse Alizabeth Eubanks came into the world at 8:04 a.m. weighing 6 pounds, 3 ounces and measuring 19 inches long, Greenville Memorial Hospital in Greenville, South Carolina, confirmed to ABC News.The child's mother, Freedom Reid of Spartanville, was not due to deliver until September 3, she said."I kind of felt like it was meant to happen, to have her on this day," Reid said when asked about giving birth on eclipse day.South Carolina is one of the 14 U.S. states that falls in the path of totality, a 70-mile-wide ribbon that will cross the country from west to east. Reid, now a mom of two, said she had plans to watch today's eclipse with her eldest daughter, but went into labor around midnight.Hours later, Eclipse arrived. Parents Reid and Michael Eubanks originally planned to name her Violet.Reid said her family was first "shocked" over the baby's unique name, but now thinks it was a great idea."I think it was just meant to be, her name," she added. "We're probably going to call her Clipsey."Eclipse joins big sister Grayson, 2. Greenville Memorial Hospital gave the newborn a total solar eclipse onesie. So far, 11 babies who were born on Aug. 21 at Greenville received the souvenir outfit.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • ABC News(NEW YORK) -- Monday's total solar eclipse will come to Americans in varying degrees of visual clarity, according to ABC News meteorologists, who say that the clearest skies are likely to appear in the Northwest in cities like San Francisco, Salem and Seattle.New York, and parts of the Tennessee Valley, around Nashville, are also more likely to have unobstructed viewing of the phenomenon.Some cloud cover is expected in parts of the Midwest, according to ABC News meteorologists path of totality -- namely states like Kansas, Missouri and Iowa.The Southeast coast of the U.S. -- from North Carolina to Georgia -- is among the areas in danger of enduring cloud cover during the eclipse.NASA has published an interactive map that shows the times for the partial and total eclipse anywhere in world. The path of totality crosses over portions of many major cities.What happens during a total solar eclipse?During a total solar eclipse, the lunar shadow will darken the sky and temperatures will drop, while bright stars and planets will appear at a time that is normally broad daylight.Retired NASA astrophysicist and photographer Fred Espenak said the experience usually lasts for just a couple minutes, but it's truly out of this world."It is unlike any other experience you've ever had," Espenak, popularly known as Mr. Eclipse, told ABC News. "It's a visceral experience; you feel it. The hair on your arms, on the back of your neck, stand up. You get goosebumps."You have to be there," he added.Espenak said the rare and striking astronomical event can last as long as seven minutes. For the Aug. 21 eclipse, NASA anticipates the longest period when the moon obscures the sun's entire surface from any given location along its path will last about two minutes and 40 seconds.Some animals may react strangely to the celestial phenomenon. Rick Schwartz, an animal behavior expert with the San Diego Zoo, said there have been observations of animals going to sleep during total solar eclipses."The animals take the visual cues of the light dimming, and the temperature cues," Schwartz told ABC News."You hear the increase of bird calls and insects that you usually associate with nightfall," he added. "Farmers have said that the cows lay down on the field or the chickens go back into the coop."
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  • Chicago Police(CHICAGO) -- The Northwestern University professor and Oxford University financial officer accused of fatally stabbing the professor's boyfriend in a Chicago high-rise allegedly committed the crime as part of a sexual fantasy hatched online, prosecutors said on Sunday.Wyndham Lathem, who was a faculty member at Northwestern's microbiology-immunology department for 10 years, and a second suspect, University of Oxford employee Andrew Warren, were both taken into custody without incident in Northern California on August 4 after a nationwide manhunt.Lathem, 43, and Warren spent more than one week on the run after allegedly killing 26-year-old hairstylist Trenton Cornell-Duranleau, who was found stabbed to death at a Chicago apartment registered to Lathem on July 27. At a press conference this afternoon, police described the scene as "savage and grizzly."Cornell-Duranleau was Lathem's boyfriend, Officer Eddie Johnson, Superintendent of Police with the Chicago Police Department said at a press conference on Sunday.The two suspects in Cornell-Duranleau's murder met on the internet, Chicago Police Commander Brendan Deenihan said this afternoon, and Warren came to the U.S. to meet Latham.Deenihan said on Sunday that on July 27, doorman at Lathem's building received an anonymous call that a crime may have been committed on the premises. Corenell's body was soon discovered with multiple stab wounds. Two knives, one of which was broken, were found at the scene.Witnesses say they heard what sounded like a fight at 5 a.m., according to Deenihan.Latham, who police say was staying in a hotel close to his apartment building, had picked up Warren at Chicago's O'Hare airport several days before the alleged crime took place. Police said that surveillance footage from the apartment and hotel area at the time captured Lathem in the area with Cornell.According to police, while Lathem was on the run, he sent a video message to various friends and family members apologizing for his alleged involvement in the killing. Lathem had described the killing as the biggest mistake of his life, according to Chicago police spokesman Anthony Guglielmi.Guglielmi also said the two suspects donated $1,000 in the victim’s name to the public library in Lake Geneva, Wisconsin. Police said Sunday that it is unclear why that library location was chosen.Lathem, who has been a faculty member at Northwestern's microbiology-immunology department for 10 years, has been banned from entering the school, according to Alan Cubbage, Northwestern University vice president for university relations.
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