• iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- One victim of an Ohio divorce attorney who was convicted in 2014 of hypnotizing and then molesting his clients spoke out in an interview with ABC News' Good Morning America that aired Monday."He ruined a lot of peoples' lives," the woman, who wished to be identified only by her first name, Melissia, said. "He ruined a lot of self-worth that some of us had. It’s gone."Melissia's interview comes as authorities released under-cover video that captures Michael Fine, 59, as he attempts to hypnotize and take advantage of another female client.Fine was arrested after local authorities put a hidden camera on an accessory of one of his clients as part of a sting operation, after the client had told police that her clothing was often disheveled after her appointments with Fine, and she was suffering memory loss. In the video, the attorney can be seen putting a woman into a trance without her consent by saying it is just a "breathing exercise.""Your entire body is a vessel of pleasure and arousal and excitement and the better it feels the tighter you'll grip my hand," Fine says in the footage, and then proceeds to ask the client "when was the last time you made love?"When his victim snaps out of her trance, Fine acts as if nothing ever happened, saying "OK, so we have some papers to go over," at which point police burst into the room and arrested Fine. He is now serving a 12-year prison sentence for hypnotizing six female clients, after he pleaded guilty to five counts of kidnapping and one count of attempted kidnapping. Fine also faces six civil lawsuits."Seeing that video made me so so sick. It made me so angry, and panicky-feeling too," Melissia said. "I couldn't sleep after I saw the video."Melissia said she first hired Fine as an attorney in April 2014, and she said that she paid him $17,000.Melissia added that Fine would say he wanted to help her "relax.""He didn't call it hypnosis," Melissia said. "He called it mindfulness."Melissia added that the incident has changed her life in many ways."I will not be in a room with anybody by myself," Melissia said. "No shutting doors, I don't care who you are."Attorney Laura Mills, who is representing Melissia in her civil court case against Fine, told GMA that they are suing him "so that he is held accountable.""Clearly now he's in jail, but the actions he committed against Melissia need to be pursued in a civil suit so he can be accountable for expenses," Mills said.Mills added however, that their "most important message" is "building awareness.""What women need to understand is this can't happen," Mills said. "Women who experience that should not be embarrassed or ashamed about coming forward and talking to a counselor."
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  • Twitter/@RyanMooreMS(ATLANTA) — At least 19 people have died over the last 48 hours due to tornadoes, as a violent system of storms made its way across the South from Mississippi to the Florida Panhandle and parts of Alabama and Georgia.At least 15 people died and around two dozen were injured in Georgia from tornadoes early Sunday morning, following four tornado-related deaths that occurred in Mississippi on Saturday morning.According to the Georgia Emergency Management Agency, four people died in Dougherty County near Albany, seven in Cook County near Adel, and two people died in both Berrien and Brooks counties.After storms ripped through the region overnight, more tornado watches were issued Sunday for the Panhandle of Florida and southern Alabama, and the Georgia Emergency Management and Homeland Security Agency has issued a state of emergency for the seven south central Georgia counties impacted by the storm."The National Weather Service predicts a third wave of severe weather today, which may reach as far north as metro Atlanta. I urge all Georgians to exercise caution and vigilance in order to remain safe and prevent further loss of life or injuries," Gov. Nathan Deal said in a statement.President Trump expressed condolences to the people of Georgia affected by the tornadoes to the press Sunday from the White House."I want to start off by telling you I just spoke with Governor Nathan Deal of Georgia, great state, great people," Trump said. "Florida affected, Alabama affected by the tornadoes, and just expressed our sincere condolences for the lives taken."Trump added that the tornadoes "were vicious and powerful and strong," and said that people suffered as a result of them."So we'll be helping out the state of Georgia," Trump added.Images on social media showed telephone poles cracked in half, and what looked like entire streets torn apart by the storms that have churned through the South this weekend.Michael Miller, coroner in Brooks County, Georgia, told ABC News that two deaths were confirmed in his county with five more fatalities in Cook County and four more in nearby Berrien County.At least 23 other people in the state are injured.In the area of Hattiesburg, Mississippi, where at least four people died, a large tornado leveled homes and buildings, trapping residents in their homes, authorities said.Further north in Choctaw County, Mississippi, on Saturday at least four people were injured and at least 20 homes damaged from a possible tornado, according to the National Weather Service. Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(WALTON COUNTY, Fla.) — A Rhode Island activist who was on a mission to walk across the country barefoot was struck and killed by an SUV while walking on a Florida highway on Saturday afternoon.Mark Baumer was walking on the shoulder of Highway 90 in Walton County, Fla. when the driver of the SUV veered off the road and hit him, ABC News affiliate WEAR reported on Sunday. He was pronounced dead at the scene.The driver has been identified as Sonja Siglar of Westville, Fla. The Florida Highway Patrol ruled out alcohol as a factor and said that charges are pending, according to WEAR.Baumer said he was hiking across the country to “save earth” and to raise funding for the FANG Collective, a non-profit organization that protests the natural gas industry.FANG confirmed Baumer’s death in a Facebook post and asked the public to honor his memory by looking back at the blog posts and poems he produced during his barefoot trek across the U.S.“We are shocked and devastated to learn about the passing of our friend Mark Baumer,” the organization said in a statement on Sunday. “We will work to commemorate and honor Mark's life in the best way that we can.”According to his website, Barefoot Across America, Baumer began the journey in October of last year, when he vowed to chronicle the trip in daily video and blog posts.“I began the journey on Oct. 13, 2016. I don’t know when it will end,” Baumer said on his website, urging visitors to donate to his YouCaring campaign.As of Monday, the “Crossing America Barefoot to Save Earth from Climate Change” campaign had raised more than $14,000, exceeding its goal by more than $4,000.“Every day corporations continue to profit from earth's destruction. I decided cross America barefoot to see if I could save Earth," the campaign said in its mission statement. "I know this is a lofty goal, but I hope through my walk I can raise awareness about climate change."The campaign posted its last update on Jan. 16, when it announced that it was “three-quarters of the way to $10,000.” At least 50 donations had been made since Sunday, bringing the total number of supporters to about 400.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(SAN ANTONIO) — At least one person was killed and three others shot after an attempted robbery at a San Antonio mall on Sunday, officials said.The incident began when two suspects tried to rob a Kay Jewelers store at Rolling Oaks Mall, according to San Antonio police.One person tried to intervene and was shot and killed by one of the suspects, police said. Another individual at the mall shot one of the robbery suspects, police said, while the second robbery suspect shot two other people as he escaped from the mall.Police later apprehended the suspect who fled the scene. "The suspect wrecked out in a stolen vehicle in the area ... Two weapons were recovered," the San Antonio Police Department said in a statement.Both suspects are in custody and are each facing one charge of capital murder and two counts of aggravated assault with a deadly weapon, police said.The three shooting victims were taken to San Antonio Medical Center. Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) --   Activists and politicians are participating in the Women's March on Washington this morning, the biggest of hundreds of marches taking place today.The rally featured speeches from women's rights activist Gloria Steinem, Planned Parenthood president Cecile Richards, actress Ashley Judd and director Michael Moore among others.A group of largely women senators and other politicians took the stage together at one point, including Kirsten Gillibrand, Claire McCaskill, and newly elected Senators Kamala Harris and Tammy Duckworth, who addressed the group as did Rep. Maxine Waters. Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz and Sen. Cory Booker were also on stage.With the timing and sheer number of people involved, it comes as little surprise that there are various causes attached to the march, which was largely billed as a demonstration in support of women's rights and civil rights but for many has clear political undertones connected to the inauguration of Donald Trump.While crowd estimates are fluctuating and have not been confirmed, the DC Metro system posted on Twitter that there have been 275,000 trips as of 11:00 a.m. this morning. By comparison, 193,000 trips had been taken by the same time on Friday ahead of the inauguration.  Steinem thanked the crowd for showing up en masse, declaring, "We have people power and we will use it.""Thank you for understanding that sometimes we have to put our bodies where our beliefs are. Sometimes pressing send is not enough," she said to the crowd, many of whom wore bright pink knitted hats.  Steinem suggested that the size and energy of today's gathering in Washington was a positive outgrowth of Trump's election and inauguration."This is the upside of the downside. This is an outpouring of energy and true democracy like I have never seen in my very long life. It is wide in age, it is deep in diversity," Steinem said.She praised "our great leaders" Barack and Michelle Obama, Sen. Bernie Sanders, and Hillary Clinton "who told the whole world that women's rights are human rights and human rights are women's rights," quoting Clinton's speech at a United Nations conference in 1995.  Steinem then turned her focus to President Trump.The new president's "Twitter finger must not become a trigger finger," she said. Shortly before Steinem took the podium, actress America Ferrera was one of the first speakers at the rally ahead of the march, calling for supporters to "fight, oppose" the Trump administration.  "Marchers, make no mistake. We are -- every single one of us -- under attack. Our safety and freedoms are on the chopping block," she said.Some of the homemade signs at the rally were related to Hillary Clinton, Trump's campaign rival. One read "Still With Her" using a play on Clinton's campaign slogan, and another read "Lock Him Up," playing on a chant that some Trump supporters directed at Clinton during the campaign. Several "Stronger Together" posters from the Clinton campaign were spotted as well.While she wasn't there in person, Clinton gave her support via Twitter.
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  • Lori Feehan(WASHINGTON) --  Among the hundreds of thousands of women expected to descend upon the nation's capital Saturday morning for the Women's March on Washington are public figures hailing from the worlds of entertainment, politics and activism.But one category of participants will be families taking to the streets together: Multiple generations of women walking hand-in-hand for a common goal.And that goal, according to the march's statement of its mission and principles, is to "send a bold message" that women's rights are human rights and more broadly to unify movements working for a variety of causes, including reproductive rights, environmental protection, the end of police brutality, and for greater rights for LGBT individuals, immigrants, minorities, workers and the disabled.ABC News spoke to seven families who plan to attend the march.Raised by generations of strong women before them, the women say they want to continue the standard of activism set by their relatives.These are the stories of the mothers, daughters and grandmothers who will be marching together:Lori Feehan, 63, and Pamela Zakielarz, 30: Marching to Continue Social ProgressLori Feehan, a retired pharmaceutical executive from Charleston, South Carolina, grew up in the early 1970s when "things were very different" for women's rights and other social issues, she told ABC News."Reproductive choice was really hard to come by," she said. "There was no real birth control that was reliable. Abortions were coat hangers. Women's careers were limited. There was no tolerance for gay people or anyone who was different."She continues, "It was a completely different time. Knowing where we are and how far we've come, I don't want to see us roll back."Feehan admitted that she takes for granted what she says are "the improvements that we've made in society," but said she's "scared for that now."  Feehan's daughter Pamela Zakielarz, a high school counselor in Havertown, Pennsylvania, said her mother is her role model, having watched her work her way up to a high-level leadership role in corporate America in the 1980s, 1990s and 2000s, when the corporate world was largely dominated by men."She helped pave the way for me and my sister and women across America to be treated as leaders and as equals," Zakielarz said.Zakielarz said she would like to facilitate a "platform for strong, powerful, meaningful voices for the rights of women ... I want to keep making progress. I want to keep moving forward. I'm really concerned. Why would we want to go backwards? So many women and some men had to sacrifice to get us to the place that we are."Her mother said she thinks some people may have have grown complacent."I feel that in recent years a lot of us have sat back and just assumed that things would keep going forward, and that we can relax," she said. "We can't." Cecily Helgessen, 49, and Scarlett Helgessen, 10: Marching to Continue the Family Tradition of ActivismFor Cecily Helgessen, the granddaughter of Polish immigrants, activism runs in her blood."Marching with my daughter will be a wonderful extension of the women I was raised by," the Manhattan-based nurse practitioner told ABC News.Helgessen's grandmother and namesake, "the original Cecily Helgessen," was a young teen when women were given the right to vote in 1920, and was "very active in the league for women voters," Helgessen said.  Her mother, Stephanie Helgessen, marched alongside Martin Luther King, Jr. in Selma, Alabama, and to this day, she continues to search for a familiar face whenever she comes across historical photos from that 1965 day."It's meant so much for me to have that as my dialogue and as my standard for how I live and the lens that I see the rest of the world through," she said.Helgessen said she hopes the march will help teach her 10-year-old daughter Scarlett Helgessen, "how to have a voice and how to be an activist.""She is coming of age, where gender identity and professional and p
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