• ABC News(NEW YORK) -- Hours before O.J. Simpson is to go before a Nevada parole board, Fred and Kim Goldman, the father and sister of Ron Goldman, spoke out and said they may never see justice for the killing of their family member."Ron never gets to spend his life doing what he wanted to do," a tearful Fred Goldman told ABC News Chief Anchor George Stephanopoulos Thursday on Good Morning America. "We'll never get to share his life, and the killer will walk free and get to do whatever he wants."Stephanopoulos asked the Goldmans if they think they may ever see justice.We'll "probably never see that ... never get the justice," Fred Goldman said.Fred and Kim Goldman were present as Simpson stood trial for the 1994 killing of Ron Goldman and the football star's wife, Nicole Brown Simpson.Simpson was acquitted of charges in both killings but in an unrelated case he is serving a 33-year sentence at Lovelock Correctional Center in Lovelock, Nevada in connection with a kidnapping and armed robbery.Simpson has so far served nine years and will have a parole hearing Thursday in which case, the former Heisman trophy winner could walk free.Craig Arnett, a former guard at Lovelock Correctional, described Simpson as a model prisoner."He's still an inmate, but he definitely wasn't a problem child like some of the other ones were," Arnett told ABC News Wednesday. "I think he has a strong chance of getting out. I think he hasn't really been a problem in prison."If Simpson is granted parole, his earliest possible release date is Oct. 1.Denial could mean at least another three years behind bars.ABC will have live coverage of Simpson's parole hearing Thursday at 1 p.m. Eastern.
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  • Ethan Miller/Getty Images(LOVELOCK, Nev.) -- O.J. Simpson is set to face a Nevada parole board Thursday, and if he's granted parole, he could be a free man later this year.Simpson, 70, is expected to appear remotely via video conference from Lovelock Correctional Facility in Nevada, where he's serving time for kidnapping and armed robbery.If the former football star is granted parole on Thursday, his earliest possible release date would be Oct. 1.If he is not granted parole, commissioners will decide the date of the next parole board meeting, which could be as far away as five years.Thursday's hearing is set for 1 p.m. ET.Simpson's football career took him from the University of Southern California football to the Buffalo Bills. Following his retirement, his celebrity status catapulted him to movie stardom and a cushy Brentwood, California, mansion.More than 20 years ago, Simpson went on trial for the killing of his ex-wife, Nicole Brown Simpson, and her friend, Ron Goldman. The two were found on June 12, 1994, stabbed to death at her Los Angeles home. On Oct. 3, 1995, at the end of a televised trial that captivated the nation, Simpson was acquitted of all criminal charges. He has always maintained his innocence.A civil jury later ordered Simpson to pay $33.5 million in damages after finding him liable for wrongful death in the double murder.Simpson is in prison following an arrest in 2007 during a botched robbery in Las Vegas, when he led a group of men into a hotel and casino to steal sports memorabilia at gunpoint. The former football star contended the memorabilia and other personal items belonged to him.He was charged with a number of felony counts, including kidnapping and armed robbery. He was found guilty and sentenced to up to 33 years in prison.His bid for a new trial in the case was rejected in 2013, but he was granted parole that same year on some of the charges, based on good behavior. He was not released from prison at that time, since his prison sentences were set to run consecutively. Simpson had to wait until this year to appear again before the parole board.Simpson’s friend, Tom Scotto, told ABC News that Simpson is "hopeful." Scotto said if Simpson is freed, he would want "to just keep a low profile, be with his kids, be with his family, play golf."A July 14 statement on behalf of Ron Goldman's father, Fred Goldman, and sister, Kim Goldman, released by their publicity firm, said: "Fred and Kim Goldman anxiously await" Simpson's parole hearing."While they respect the legal process, they are feeling both frustration and anticipation over how this will change their lives again should Simpson be released. As with all victims and survivors, they will remain patient and optimistic that the system will do what is necessary to ensure the public’s safety remains a priority and that proper justice will be served,” the statement read.Goldman's family told ABC News earlier this year they cannot bear the idea of Simpson as a free man."Disgust," Fred Goldman said when asked what it would look like to him if Simpson was paroled.Added Kim Goldman, "He committed a horrible heinous crime, and I have no feeling except rot in hell." Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • Arapahoe County Sheriff's Office(AURORA, Colo.) -- It was a cool summer night on July 20, 2012 in Aurora, Colorado as Batman fans took their seats at the Century 16 movie theater for a midnight showing of The Dark Knight Rises.The highly anticipated third installment of the Batman trilogy opened to packed auditoriums at midnight showings across the country, but little did the moviegoers in Aurora know that their attendance to see the summer blockbuster would come to a terrible conclusion in real life.Five years later, here is a look back at the devastating shooting that shocked a nation:Shooter James Holmes purchased four guns prior to the massacreIn the 60 days leading up to the shooting, Holmes had purchased four guns from local shops and more than 6,000 rounds of ammunition, police said at the time.All of the weapons and ammunition were purchased legally, police said.Sold-out midnight premiere of The Dark Knight RisesHolmes had bought a ticket to the movie before slipping out and propping an emergency exit open, federal law enforcement sources told ABC News.About 30 minutes into the movie, Holmes had gathered his weapons and re-entered the movie auditorium through the emergency exit wearing a ballistics helmet, bulletproof vest, bulletproof leggings, a gas mask and gloves.Holmes then detonated multiple smoke bombs before he unloaded four weapons' full of ammunition into the unsuspecting crowd of hundreds of attendees, police said.12 people were killed, dozens more injuredTen victims died at the scene, while another two died at local hospitals. Among the dead was a 6-year-old girl.Seventy people were injured in the ordeal, police said. Most were injured by gunfire, but a "handful" were injured during the chaos that ensued. One injured victim was hit by gunfire in an adjacent theater.A 3-month-old was among those taken to the University of Colorado Hospital, but he or she was quickly discharged, Dr. Comilla Sasson told ABC News at the time. Twenty-two victims were taken to University of Colorado Hospital that night.At the time, the massacre was the deadliest shooting since the Columbine High School shooting in 1999.Witnesses recall the horrorWitnesses said they thought the smoke and gunshots were part of the movie until they saw Holmes standing in front of the screen."You just smelled smoke and you just kept hearing it, you just heard bam bam bam, non-stop," one witness told ABC News in 2012. "The gunman never had to reload. Shots just kept going, kept going, kept going."Moviegoer Christopher Ramos told ABC News in 2012 that "people were running everywhere," including on top of him, and called the shooting a "real-life nightmare.""I froze up. I was scared," Ramos said. "I honestly thought I was going to die."Some lied on the ground to protect themselves."I'm with coworkers and we're on the floor praying to God we don't get shot, and the gunshots continue on and on, and when the sound finally stopped, we started to get up and people were just bleeding," another theatergoer said at the time.At one point, Holmes exited the theater, only to wait outside and shoot patrons as they attempted to flee, witness Jennifer Seeger said on ABC News' Good Morning America after the shooting.Holmes arrested nearby within minutes of the shootingPolice apprehended Holmes in his car behind the theater within minutes of the shooting. He was found in full riot gear and carrying three weapons, including an AR-15 assault rifle, a Remington 12-gauge shotgun, and a .40 caliber Glock handgun. A fourth handgun was also found inside the vehicle.Holmes told arresting officers that he was "The Joker," referring to the villain in the second installment of the Batman movie trilogy, The Dark Knight.Holmes had booby-trapped his apartmentWhen Holmes was arrested, he warned police that he had booby-trapped his apartment.The next day, police, bomb squads and agents from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives found a large number of explosive devic
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(PAYSON, Ariz.) -- The remains found near a debris-filled creek in central Arizona on Wednesday night are believed to be those of a 27-year-old man who went missing after a deadly flash flood over the weekend.The Gila County Sheriff’s office said it located remains near the Shoo Fly Creek that are "believed to be related to the search" for Hector Garnica, who went missing Saturday after torrential rains flooded the Cold Springs swimming hole near Payson, Arizona, where he and his family were celebrating his wife's birthday.Garnica’s wife, Maria Garnica, and their three children -- Danny, 7; Mia, 5; and Emily, 3 -- were carried away and killed in the flood. Five other members of the family were also killed; four family members were rescued.Gila County Sheriff J. Adam Shepherd called the investigation "open and very complex" at a Wednesday evening press conference where he said the remains would be examined to confirm the victim’s identity."We are working with the dept. of public safety to do a DNA analysis on the remains to make sure that this is the individual that we’re looking for," Shepherd said, "and of course that being our tenth victim to this situation, Hector Garnica."Hector Garnica’s family announced earlier on Wednesday that funeral services for the nine relatives who died in the flood would be held early next week. Only four of the 14 family members who were swimming at the creek were rescued, officials said.Shepherd confirmed that the family had been notified about the remains."We have been working with the family," Shepherd said Wednesday. "They have been notified and we have been talking to them."Authorities said a Department of Public Safety helicopter crew spotted the remains on the side of the East Verde River as they were mapping out a search plan.
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  • Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- A juror who served on the 1995 O.J. Simpson criminal trial says his perception of Simpson’s innocence has changed over the years, but he ultimately stands by the not guilty verdict.“Based off the evidence as presented in the trial … the only conclusion I can come to is not guilty,” Lon Cryer told ABC News' Nightline co-anchor Dan Harris. “It wasn't based on whether or not I really thought he did it or didn't do it… The only thing that trial did was raise reasonable doubt in my mind about whether or not he was the perpetrator or not.”In 1995, Simpson was acquitted of the murders of his ex-wife Nicole Brown Simpson and Ron Goldman in what became known as the “trial of the century.” In 1997, however, Simpson lost a wrongful death civil suit that the Goldman and Brown families brought against him, and was ordered to pay $33.5 million in damages. Simpson has always maintained he did not kill Goldman and Brown.Watch the full story on "Nightline" Thursday at 12:35 a.m. ETCryer, who was juror No. 247 in the 1995 “The People vs. O.J. Simpson” criminal trial, said he now feels differently about Simpson.“I'm probably pretty sure that he probably is the person that went over there and killed Nicole Brown Simpson and Ron Goldberg,” he said.Cryer said his perception changed after Simpson’s notorious book, If I Did It: Confessions of a Killer, came to light.“I thought that was so bush league,” he said. “It became apparent to me in my mind that he was probably the person that went over there and killed those people.”Cryer is perhaps best known as the juror who gave Simpson a black power salute -- a raised fist -- as he left the courtroom after the verdict was announced.“It was only to say to Mr. Simpson ... ‘Hey man, enjoy your life, go back and be a real person again, because really, truthfully this was a blessing to you that we gave you here,’” Cryer said. “I wanted to try to let him know how I felt about it, really, about him and about the fact that he had been acquitted.”Cryer is featured in a four-part series, The Jury Speaks, airing on Oxygen that takes a look at some of the major trials of our time through the jurors’ eyes and asks them to recast their verdict votes given what they know now.Nancy Glass, the executive producer of the Oxygen series, said she believes the public is still fascinated with the Simpson case because it’s still “an unsolved mystery.”“And it involves money, celebrity, sex, murder,” she said. “I think it will always capture our imagination even if an answer is found.”Reflecting on big moments during the 1995 criminal trial, Cryer brought up the infamous glove experiment, in which Simpson tried on a bloody glove found at the crime scene and the glove didn’t fit. Cryer said he thought that demonstration “backfired on the prosecution.”“It screams out to me that obviously those gloves don't fit him which means that maybe he wasn't the perpetrator of the crimes,” he said.Simpson had put on rubber gloves before trying on the glove in court, which Cryer acknowledged would likely change how the glove fit.“But you have to remember that the prosecution allowed that to happen,” he said.That experiment is something Marcia Clark, the lead prosecutor in the trial, said she tried to stop from ever happening.“I didn’t want to do it,” she told ABC News in a 2016 interview. “I knew it was a mistake … I objected. I said the latex is going to screw up the fit, they’ve shrunk, you know, I mean, I was on the record.”Another pivotal moment in the trial was the audio tapes of LAPD Det. Mark Fuhrman, the officer who found the bloody glove and was heard the recordings using racial slurs. Hearing the Fuhrman tapes, Cry
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(MINNEAPOLIS) -- The Minneapolis Police Department has released transcripts of the 911 calls placed by a bride-to-be moments before a responding officer shot her to death.Justine Ruszczyk, a 40-year-old Australian native, placed her first call to 911 Saturday night at 11:27 p.m. local time to report what she believed was a sexual assault occurring near her home in Minneapolis' Fulton neighborhood."I can hear someone out the back and I -- I'm not sure if she's having sex or being raped," Ruszczyk told the 911 operator, according to the transcript released by police."It's been going on for a while and I think she tried to say help and it sounds distressed," she adds."OK, I've already got an officer on the way," the 911 operator tells her.Ruszczyk called 911 again about eight minutes later, expressing concern that police hadn't arrived yet.According to the transcript, the operator answers: "911, what is the address of the emergency?""I just reported one but no one's here and was wondering if they got the address wrong," Ruszczyk says."Are you Justine?" the operator asks. "You're hearing a female screaming?""Yeah," Ruszczyk responds. "Yes, along behind the house.""Yup, officers are on the way there," the operator says.Two officers form the Minneapolis Police Department, identified by authorities as Matthew Harrity and Mohamed Noor, responded to Ruszczyk's call Saturday night.Harrity was driving the squad car, while Noor was in the passenger seat, according to the Minnesota Department of Public Safety. As they neared Ruszczyk's home, Harrity indicated that he was startled by a loud sound near the car, after which Ruszczyk immediately approached the driver's side, authorities said.Noor then fired his weapon, striking Ruszczyk through the driver's side window, which was open, the Minnesota DPS said. The officers provided medical assistance to Ruszczyk until medics arrived but she was pronounced dead at the scene, authorities said.The Hennepin County Medical Examiner's Office confirmed Monday that Ruszczyk died of a single gunshot wound to her abdomen.Both officers have been placed on standard paid administrative leave pending the investigation. Ruszczyk's death has been ruled a homicide.Police have launched an internal affairs review of the officers' use of force.The Minneapolis Star Tribune said the woman was Australian and went by the name Justine Damond, using the last name of her fiance, Don Damond."Her maiden name was Justine Ruszczyk," the Star Tribune reported. "While the couple were not yet married, Justine referred to herself as Damond on her personal website."Damond's website says she was a yoga instructor, a personal health and life coach and a "meditation teacher, embracing and teaching the neuro-scientific benefits of meditation."
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