• iStock/Thinkstock(PORTLAND, Ore.) -- A man is in custody in Portland, Oregon, in connection with stabbings on a light-rail train that left two people dead and one injured after commuters tried to calm the suspect who was yelling what police said "would best be characterized as hate speech."
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  • UNDATED (AP) - The Colorado Rockies continue to own the National League's best record after throttling the St. Louis Cardinals in Denver.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(CHARLESTON, S.C.) -- A man who police say confessed to killing multiple people pleaded guilty to 14 charges including murder and kidnapping Friday, after the family members of his victims delivered emotional statements about the pain he caused them.Todd Kohlhepp wore an orange jumpsuit and chains in a South Carolina court on Friday, where he pleaded guilty in exchange for serving seven consecutive life sentences with no chance of parole. The solicitor agreed not to seek the death penalty as part of the deal.Kohlhepp was arrested last year after Kala Brown, who had gone missing along with her boyfriend, was found chained on his property. Brown later told police she saw Kohlhepp shoot and kill her boyfriend, Charles Carver. Carver's body was later found in a shallow grave on Kohlhepp's property.After Kohlhepp was arrested, police say he admitted that he had killed four people at a motorcycle shop in 2003. He pleaded guilty on Friday in connection with the deaths of seven people.A Spartanburg County sheriff's investigative report says Kohlhepp "confessed to investigators that he shot and killed" the owner, service manager, mechanic and bookkeeper of Superbike Motorsports, a high-performance motorcycle shop in Chesnee, South Carolina. "Kohlhepp gave details ... that only the killer would know," the report says.In a statement last year, the sheriff described Kohlhepp as “calm and polite” and said he gave his confession voluntarily.Family members of the victims filled the courtroom to watch Kohlhepp plead guilty. Many shared how losing a loved one had had a devastating impact on their lives.Melissa Ponder Brackman's husband, Scott Ponder, was killed in 2003 at the Superbike Motorsports. She shared how her husband's murder came just days after they went to an ultrasound for their first child together."He heard the heartbeat of my son just two days before he was murdered," Brackman told the court.She also said that after her husband's death she has "lived the last 13 years in complete darkness."The father of victim Meagan Coxie said, "May God have no mercy on his soul."Brown's spokesperson told the court that she could not be there in person but that she "wants to thank everyone for the support."
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(WEATHERFORD, Texas) -- Two children in Texas have died after they were locked in a hot car Friday as temperatures soared to 96 degrees, according to police.A 16-month-old boy and a 2-year-old girl were killed, police said. Their identities were not released.Deputies from the Parker County Sheriff's Office were called to a home west of Lake Weatherford shortly after 4 p.m., police said.The children's mother told police that they "took off." After searching for them on the property, she found them inside a small four-door vehicle, where they had somehow locked themselves inside, police said.The mother then broke one of the windows and found the children unresponsive, police said. They were pronounced dead at 4:33 p.m.In a statement, Parker County Sheriff Larry Fowler called the case especially heartbreaking and said that it is still in the early stages of the investigation.No further details were immediately available.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- President Donald Trump's continued attempts to limit travel and immigration from some Middle East and African countries was dealt its latest setback Thursday when the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals upheld an earlier, temporary block of his executive order on the matter.In the aftermath, Attorney General Jeff Sessions pledged to "seek review of this case in the United States Supreme Court," where a final decision could be offered and precedent potentially set for similar matters.The Fourth Circuit heard the case on the executive order en banc, with all of the circuit's judges, a rare step reserved for cases determined to be of exceptional importance. Typically, a case before the court of appeals is heard by three judges and can be reheard by those judges or en banc after the initial decision is handed down.Because the case was already argued before the circuit's full slate of judges, the next step for the Justice Department would be to petition the Supreme Court for a writ of certiorari, the official request for the country's highest court to hear the case. The Supreme Court receives thousands of briefs each year and typically grants certiorari -- accepting the case -- to fewer than 100. At least four Supreme Court justices must approve the petition for certiorari to be granted.A separate case on the executive order is currently under deliberation by the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals. Should the panel of judges in that case decide for the government, signifying disagreement between circuits, it is more likely that the Supreme Court would be willing to hear the case quickly to settle the lower courts' diverging opinions.Should the case be accepted by the Supreme Court, the nine justice panel will have the opportunity to study the decisions from, and information provided to, the lower courts. They can also review amicus curiae briefs submitted by outside parties with an interest in the case before hearing oral arguments and questioning each side.Not only can the justices then affirm or overturn the lower court's decision, they also have the ability to send the case back to the circuit for review with additional information, evidence or context.All the while, the decision of the lower court will continue to stand while the Justice Department continues to pursue the case.
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  • U.S. Coast Guard(CAY SAL, Bahamas) -- The FBI has joined the investigation into the case of a South Florida woman who went missing at sea while sailing with her husband.Isabella Hellmann was last seen by her husband, Lewis Bennett, while they were at sea on the night of May 14, according to the U.S. Coast Guard.FBI Special Agent Michael Leverock confirmed to ABC News on Friday that the Bureau is now investigating Hellmann's disappearance, but declined to provide further information.According to ABC affiliate WPBF-TV, Bennett said he and Hellman were aboard his 37-foot catamaran near the Bahamas when he went to bed around 8 p.m. Eastern time. He said his wife, who was wearing a life vest at the time, agreed to take watch above deck, U.S. Coast Guard spokesman Eric Woodall told WPBF-TV.Bennett said he later awoke to something hitting the boat and felt that it was starting to sink, WPBF-TV reported. He couldn’t find his wife, so he jumped onto a life raft and sent out a distress call, he told the Coast Guard. Bennett was found on the life raft the following day.After days of scouring the waters off the Bahamas, the Coast Guard called off the search for the missing woman late last week, according to WPBF-TV.
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