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  • ABC News(SACRAMENTO, Calif.) -- The sister of a "Golden State Killer" victim "can finally breathe again" after a suspect’s arrest in the decades-old serial killing and rape case in California, she told ABC News."We finally got the guy who brutally raped and murdered my sister," Michelle Cruz, a sister of victim Janelle Cruz, told ABC News Wednesday of the accused man.Janelle Cruz died in 1986 in Irvine, California.The arrest is "surreal" and "unbelievable," Michelle Cruz added on "Good Morning America" today."I'm so thankful this journey is finally over," she said. "And I can rest and go to bed at night, and rest easier knowing that he's in jail and he'll never walk free again."The "Golden State Killer" is believed to have killed at least 12 people, raped at least 50 people and committed multiple home burglaries in the 1970s and 1980s in crime sprees throughout California.His "reign of terror," Orange County District Attorney Tony Rackauckas said Wednesday, spanned from the Sacramento area in Northern California down to Orange County in Southern California.The suspected serial killer, Joseph James DeAngelo, was surprised when he was confronted by officers and arrested Tuesday afternoon in Citrus Heights in Sacramento County, Sacramento County Sheriff Scott Jones said.DeAngelo, 72, was a police officer until 1979, officials said.His name had never come up in the investigation before last week, Sacramento District Attorney Anne Marie Schubert said.It was discarded DNA that confirmed, "We had our man," Jones said at a news conference Wednesday.After Janelle died, Michelle Cruz said, their family left Irvine and never returned.Her sister's murder "completely changed my world, my life, my identity,” she said."I kind of lived in sort of a bubble" for the first 20 years, Michelle Cruz said Wednesday. "I never really talked about the case."But she started talking about her sister's death more about eight years ago, Cruz said, "hoping to spread awareness and solve the case."She was always worried about her own safety, never staying home alone and barricading her windows and doors."I won't have to research this case for hours every day and miss out on my children and my family," she said. "I can finally breathe again."
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  • ABCNews.com(NEW YORK) -- Lyle Menendez, one of the two affluent California brothers convicted for the 1989 murders of their parents, spoke out to DailyMailTV in his first interview since he reunited with his brother, Erik Menendez.The brothers came face to face earlier this month for the first time in 22 years after Lyle was transferred to the R.J. Donovan Correctional Facility, where Erik had been housed since July 2013, said Robert Rand, a journalist who has covered the case since 1989 and was a consultant for NBC's 2017 TV series on the brothers.Lyle "ended up bursting into tears" upon seeing his brother, he said in an exclusive interview with DailyMailTV, a preview of which was shared with ABC News' Good Morning America."It was just something I wasn't sure was ever going to happen," Lyle said. "It was just a remarkable moment."The two hadn't seen each other since September 1996, when they could see each other across a prison yard but couldn't talk to each other, Rand told ABC News. While in separate prisons, they couldn't talk on the phone, but they would write letters to each other -- sometimes playing chess by sending moves via snail mail, Rand said.On Aug. 20, 1989, Lyle, then 21, and Erik, then 18, opened fire on their parents inside their Beverly Hills mansion, using shotguns they had bought days before.In the interview, Lyle admitted he would change how he handled the aftermath of the killings."If I could take my consciousness now and go back, I would have gone to the police and taken my chances in exposing what was happening," he said.The pair was arrested in 1990 after their psychologist's girlfriend went to police, claiming Erik had confessed to the murders during a session. The doctor-patient privilege was voided after Lyle threatened the doctor's life.Lyle wishes his brother would have talked to him or a member of the clergy, instead of going to the psychologist, he told DailyMailTV."I wish that he had just talked to me, or you know, spent more time going to his parish priest, and not ended up in, sort of this therapist's hands," he said.During their trial, prosecutors painted the brothers as two spoiled and privileged children who murdered their parents out of greed in an attempt to inherit the family fortune. The defense argued that they acted in self-defense after years of abuse.The first trial ended in a mistrial. In 1996, at the end of the second trial, the brothers were convicted of first-degree murder and sentenced to two consecutive life prison terms without the possibility of parole.Despite everything that's happened, the pair has "never had any moments of animosity," Lyle told DailyMailTV."I love him deeply," he said.
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  • WABC(CLAYTON, N.J.) -- Police in New Jersey said they have arrested a suspect in a deadly road-rage incident that took the life of young father of two.Fifty-four-year-old Everett E. Moore Jr., of Clayton, New Jersey, was arrested on Wednesday in connection with the March 7 attack on Joseph Pirri, police told ABC New York station WABC.Pirri, 32, was killed while driving in his hometown of Deptford Township, New Jersey, just outside of Philadelphia, when a fellow motorist slashed him in the face with a "sharp instrument," police said.Police said Moore was driving a white pickup truck when he allegedly cut Pirri off, attacked him, and sped off "in an aggressive manner."Moore faces first-degree murder and weapons charges.Pirri, who suffered a severe wound to the left side of his face, managed to give police a detailed description of his attacker before his death on March 13, six days after the attack, according to WABC."The only thing the young man was screaming was, 'I don't want to die. I have a 4-year-old son. I don't want to die,'" Walt Wilcox, a witness, told WABC at the time of the incident. "They gave him blankets, consoling him, trying to keep him calm."Police said they were able to identify the suspect thanks to Pirri's statement and multiple videos from the scene.But the biggest break in the case came when they were able to prove that the vehicle used in the attack, a white Ford F-150 pickup, had been registered to Moore's wife, police said.Megan Pirri, the victim's wife, said news of the arrest wasn't enough to heal the massive void in her family's life."You hear stories of people who were nice and kind," she said, "but Joe truly was the definition of those words. His son, stepdaughter and I were his world. As he was ours and still is."Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • WABC(BROOKLYN, N.Y.) -- A Brooklyn teacher was arrested on Wednesday following allegations that he sexually assaulted a 15-year-old male student, police said.Andre Braddy -- an eighth-grade math teacher at PS 235 in East Flatbush -- allegedly had multiple sexual encounters with a student in a school bathroom, police told ABC New York station WABC.The accusations surfaced after the student notified his parents, who contacted the police. The boy said the encounters had been happening for at least a month, according to WABC.Braddy, 34, faces charges of sex abuse, engaging in a criminal sex act and committing an act in a manner injurious to a child.Braddy has been suspended with pay.The New York City Department of Education called the allegations "deeply disturbing" and said Braddy would not be allowed contact with students during the investigation."These deeply disturbing allegations have no place in our schools and he was immediately removed from the school," the department told WABC in a statement. "He will remain away from students pending the outcome of the investigation and we will pursue his removal from payroll as soon as legally possible."Braddy has taught eighth-grade math and advanced Algebra at the school since 2015.It was not clear if he had obtained an attorney as of Thursday morning.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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