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  • ABC News(MALIBU, Calif.) -- A three-story home in Malibu, California, was seen teetering near the top of a canyon following recent mudslides.Photos and video showed the foundation of a multimillion-dollar home crumbling, as its retaining wall had partially collapsed."We did find a good amount of water there," Los Angeles County Fire Department Inspector Randall Wright told ABC station KABC-TV in Los Angeles. "We don't know if it was in the earth itself or possibly even a sprinkler."Engineers continued to investigate the home in the 2800 block of Hume Road on Thursday."There's a section of the backyard, about 250 feet long by 60 feet wide, and as that earth slid down, it collapsed a portion of the retaining wall," Wright told ABC News in a telephone interview.No other homes nearby are threatened by the potential landslide, with the canyon below the property empty, and no injuries were reported, Wright said.Any risk of the home's plummeting into the canyon was "very small," he added.The homeowners were said to be out of town, according to several neighbors and fire officials.
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  • ABC News(NEW YORK) -- You might think you know the full story of the so-called alt-right, known for their venomous racism and virulent anti-feminism. But a new documentary is shedding light on what it says is one of the most surprising roots of the movement: Sexual frustration.Author Angela Nagle spent more than a year exploring the online origins of the current alt-right movement, which she says included communities of single men looking for advice on “picking up” women. She said many of these so-called pick-up artists argued that feminism was part of what made attracting women so difficult.Nagle’s report can be found in the new Fusion documentary, Trumpland: Kill All Normies.“It definitely did start out with the picking up women stuff,” Nagle told ABC News’ Nightline.It’s a world that appears riddled with extensive and seemingly innocuous terminology, like “manosphere,” “men’s rights” and “incels.”“[Incels] are involuntarily celibate men. And so, the incel kind of forum world was very much about expressing your frustration about being celibate. That was really the place where the endless conversations about essentially, ‘Why am I still celibate,’ turned into civilizational and racial and kind of big questions about the idea that essentially the whole sexual liberation project was a mistake,” said Nagle.Extreme right wing movement gains momentum in Europe, echoes heard around the worldThe documentary traces a community of men who act on their frustrations, which began with their grievances against women but later expanded and found footing on social media.Twitter, as shown in the documentary, has been particularly useful to help these individuals organize and to speak up when they felt their voice wasn’t being heard.In the documentary, Nagle explained how the idea of “trolling” on Twitter and other social media channels turned out to be clever on the part of the community. “Internet trolls” are known for their social media posts on divisive issues. Nagle said this tactic may be one of the reasons that people didn’t see the alt-right movement forming.As Nagle says in Trumpland: Kill All Normies, “There was for years beforehand this idea of trolling and this idea that it's all irony. It's all playful. That was the most clever thing they did because it allowed them to actually kind of hide their politics.”This guise of irreverence online towards others who didn’t share their views allowed the burgeoning alt-right movement to push back at an increasingly vocal community that seemed to emphasize being politically correct.“I think what happened ... with millennials essentially, who, you know, came of age online and became political online, [is that] they came into contact with these kind of ultra [politically correct] highly sensitive cultures online, which actually allowed them to be quite funny, you know, and to kind of poke fun at the earnestness of these kind of ultra-sensitive language policing online cultures,” Nagle explained to Nightline.In a way, the alt-right also gained momentum from its enemies on the left, Nagle said.“You also had a culture that was on the cultural left, which was about gender fluidity and kind of taking the cultural gains of the left to the next stage,” Nagle said in the documentary. “These kind of online environments, you could say, of the left were both kind of ultra-sensitive and incredibly cruel and inclined towards sort of quite mob like behavior [that] people needed [in order] to show that they were virtuous.”The alt-right also appeared to receive an enormous injection of energy after Trump’s election.“And when Donald Trump is nasty ... [he] is a magnificent internet troll,” Tolito said in the documentary. “He is an expert at trafficking and outrage and committing outrage and b
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(BOYNTON BEACH, Fla.) -- Two people have died in Florida after being struck by new high-speed Brightline trains on the state's East Coast Railway tracks, sparking concerns about pedestrian safety and calls for a federal investigation.Brightline, whose trains run across several car crossings in South Florida, has been linked to two pedestrian fatalities since it debuted its passenger service there less than a week ago.The most recent fatality occurred on Wednesday afternoon when a bicyclist was struck and killed by one of the company’s high-speed passenger trains in Boynton Beach, Florida, about 30 miles north of Fort Lauderdale.The victim, identified as 51-year-old Jeffrey D. King, of Boynton Beach, was trying to beat the fast-approaching train when he rode around the safety gates, which were down at the time, and attempted to cross the tracks, police said.Another pedestrian, Melissa Lavell, 32, was fatally struck on Friday while trying to cross the tracks in Boynton Beach, according to police. The gates were down on that occasion as well.In the aftermath of the fatalities, U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson, D-Fla., wrote a letter to the Department of Transportation on Wednesday, calling for a federal investigation into the security of the state’s track crossings.Nelson, the top Democrat on the Senate Commerce Committee, said Palm Beach County, Florida, where the accidents occurred, was “one of the highest counties for such incidents” and said the situation required “urgent attention.”“In Florida, we have seen the challenges of addressing grade crossing safety, where according to 2016 data the state is in the top ten for fatalities and collisions,” Nelson wrote, according to a copy of the letter obtained by ABC News. “Tragically, this trend is continuing with two recent fatalities in Boynton Beach involving the Brightline high-speed train.“While these investigations are ongoing, I urge you to examine these incidents and to review the safety of rail crossings, particularly for higher speed trains,” he added.Brightline, which plans to expand into Miami and Orlando soon, said it was cooperating with the investigation. It currently runs between West Palm Beach and Fort Lauderdale."Brightline continues to reinforce awareness and education," the company said in a statement. "It is critical that the public remains attentive when near any active railroad, always obey the laws and respect the safety devices that are in place to protect the public.“Never try to beat a train," it added.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(DALLAS) -- Passengers on an American Airlines flight suffered some tense moments on Thursday after they were instructed to brace for impact as their plane made an emergency landing due to mechanical issues. The entire frightening incident was recorded by a passenger.In a video from passenger Steve Ramsthel, a flight attendant tells passengers, “you will need to be seated in a brace position for landing.”The plane, operated by Mesa Airlines, was traveling from Phoenix and ultimately landed safely at Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport.Ramsthel told Phoenix ABC affiliate KNXV that he could smell smoke in the plane."There were some people crossing themselves, but I thought the adrenaline was high and everybody just cooperated," Ramsthel said. "It was pretty amazing to be honest with you."Ramsthel, who is a certified pilot, said passengers remained calm and the captain and crew handled the situation very well.American Airlines later released a statement, saying, “A flight made an emergency landing on January 17 due to mechanical issues stemming from a broken fan. There were no reported injuries.”The plane has been inspected, and is now back in service, according to the airline.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • ABC News(SPRINGFIELD, Tenn.) -- Tennessee authorities are searching for two teenage sisters who are missing and believed to have run away from home.The Robertson County Sheriff's Office said Kayla Ward, 17, and Brooke Ward, 14, of Springfield, Tennessee, were last seen at their home on Highway 76 just outside of Springfield and are believed to have run away on Jan. 11.Their mother, Lisa Ward, said she discovered her daughters were gone the following morning and found a goodbye note written in Brooke's handwriting on the window sill, that said in part, "just pray for me. I am going to find some place that will help me, the help I think I need and not your help.""Please don’t come looking for me," the note continued. "They are be taking good care of me so don’t worry either I love you."Law enforcement doesn't believe the teens are in imminent danger; however, their family fears they could end up as trafficking victims.Brooke and Kayla were adopted by Ward and her husband Todd Ward in 2010. Their biological mother had a long history of drug abuse and prostitution and both girls suffer from reactive attachment disorder.The sisters were featured in the Diane Sawyer 20/20 special report "Generation Meds" in 2011, about the overmedication of children in foster care. Brooke was at one point on 13 different psychotropic drugs."Kayla and Brooke suffered years of trauma and neglect, followed by five years in foster care. They have had many trauma struggles to overcome in their young lives," Lisa Ward told ABC News. "Please help us find our girls, to get them help for this time, and remind them they have a family now that loves them more than words. They don’t have to search for strangers to 'show them the way,' their family is here waiting to. No tip is too small, please share and be on the lookout for them. We won’t give up, please help us find them."Lisa Ward told ABC News she wanted her daughters to know they are loved and cared for, and said she will "never give up" on them.The Robertson County Sheriff’s Office is asking anyone with information about the teenagers' whereabouts please contact local law enforcement or the Robertson County Sheriff’s Office tip line at 615-382-6600.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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