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  • David McNew/Getty Images(SANTA ROSA, CALIFORNIA) -- Roland Hendel and his family had just moments to escape the firestorm bearing down on their Sonoma County home.But despite "exploding propane tanks, twisting metal, and the hot swirling winds," one of their beloved dogs refused to come with them. Instead, Odin, a Great Pyrenees, stayed with the family's eight "bottle-fed rescue goats" as the family and Odin's sister Tessa fled.Hendel and his family were certain Odin and the goats were gone."Hours later when we had found relative safety we cried for Odin and our goats," Hendel wrote on the family's YouCaring crowdfunding page. "I was sure I had sentenced them to a horrific and agonizing death."Days later, when it was safe for the Hendels to return to their charred home, they found "a burned, battered, and weakened Odin surrounded by his eight goats, and several small deer who had come to him for protection and safety," Hendel wrote.Odin's now on the mend after his ordeal, but challenges remain for the Hendel family.The blazes engulfing the area are among the deadliest in the state's history according to the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, charring more than 214,000 acres, forcing 100,000 residents to evacuate and damaging or destroying at least 5,700 homes and businesses -- including the Hendel's property.All of the family's structures "were decimated, including the barn we had lovingly rebuilt," and the pumphouse, meaning no shelter or fresh water supply for the animals.The Hendels are now racing to rebuild before winter hits so that Odin’s “bravery and sacrifice are not in vain.”
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  • Joseph M. Acaba/Twitter(NEW YORK) -- For astronauts onboard the International Space Station, there are countless magnificent sights to see as they orbit the Earth.But NASA's Joe Acaba, who is of Puerto Rican heritage, was waiting for the moment that the International Space Station would pass over his family's hurricane-ravaged homeland -- and that moment was finally realized on Saturday.Acaba, 50, tweeted a pair of photos of the island, along with a message to the people still recovering from the destruction of Hurricane Maria.
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  • Photodisc/Thinkstock(MIAMI) -- An 8-year-old girl died Saturday after falling from one deck in a cruise ship's interior atrium to a lower deck, officials said.The girl, whose name has not been released, fell on the Carnival Glory cruise ship while it was docked at the Dante B. Fascell Port of Miami on Saturday morning, police said.Miami Fire Rescue personnel responded to the scene around 8:15 a.m. ET and provided emergency care to the child. The girl was subsequently taken to the nearby Ryder Trauma Center, where she died from her injuries, according to the Miami-Dade Police Department.Erika Benitez of Miami-Dade Fire Rescue told ABC News the girl was in critical condition when she arrived at the hospital.It's unclear what led the child to fall. Homicide detectives are investigating the incident, police said.Carnival Cruise Lines said the ship's command immediately contacted police after she fell, and transported her to the ship's medical center.“Our most heartfelt care and concern is with the family at this very difficult time,” Carnival Cruise Lines spokesperson Jennifer de la Cruz said in a statement Saturday. Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • Justin Sullivan/Getty Images(SANTA ROSA, Calif.) -- Firefighters are facing dry and windy conditions as they battle California’s deadliest wildfires that authorities say have killed at least 34 people, left hundreds missing and devastated entire neighborhoods in California.Intensified by strong winds and low humidity, the 17 wildfires as of today have charred more than 221,754 acres of land, forced more than 20,000 residents to evacuate and damaged or destroyed at least 3,500 homes and other structures, according to the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection.The decreased number of blazes from 21 Thursday reflects the merging of several fires while three have been completely contained.Santa Rosa, a city in Sonoma County known for its wineries, was among the hardest hit areas, with at least 2,834 homes destroyed. Critical infrastructure was also lost in the flames, including the city's fire station, Santa Rosa Mayor Chris Coursey said at a news conference Thursday afternoon.The cause of the fires is still under investigation.More than half the deaths from the fires occurred in Sonoma County alone, authorities said. Taken together, the death toll exceeds the number of fatalities in the 1933 Griffith Park Fire in Los Angeles, the deadliest wildfire in California's history, killing 29.Authorities said an alert system put in place gave residents ample time to evacuate and likely prevented many deaths."We have a subscription service where we can alert our residents, and we did that right away, trying to notify everybody where the fire was, where it was going and how fast it was going, and I think it saved a lot of lives," Sonoma County Sheriff's Sgt. Spencer Crum told ABC News in an interview Tuesday.About 400 people, most of whom are elderly, were unaccounted for in Sonoma County as of Thursday night, according to the sheriff's office. Out of about 1,100 missing person reports that have been filed since the fires began, about 745 people have been safely located. The sheriff's office said some of the reports may be duplicates.With mandatory evacuation orders and road closures still underway, many residents in the affected areas have been warned not to return to their homes until further notice.California Gov. Jerry Brown has declared states of emergency for Napa, Sonoma and Yuba counties in Northern California."Life is more important than property," Sonoma County Sheriff Robert Giordano said at a news conference Tuesday.Another round of gusty winds and dry airWhile overall containment of the flames has increased, a large weather system moving into the region today will bring another round of gusty winds and low humidity to the state over the weekend. Gusts could reach up to 60 mph in some areas late tonight into Saturday, while daytime humidity could be as low as 10 percent.The combination of strong winds, dry air and warm temperatures will create "critical fire weather conditions" and "contribute to extreme fire behavior," the National Weather Service warned.Red flag warnings for gusty winds and low humidity remain in effect across the fire areas and much of northern California. The conditions will challenge the more than 8,000 firefighters working to snuff the flames and prevent new wildfires from igniting.With firefighters stretched thin throughout the state, hundreds of additional fire engines and personnel have been requested from other states to help relieve crews on the front lines and be prepared for the possibility of more blazes, according to the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection.Most of the flames ignited on the night of Oct. 8 or during the early morning hours of Oct. 9.Here's a roundup of the largest fires still threatening California:Central LNU Complex fires
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  • Noam Galai/WireImage(NEW YORK) -- Celebrities and everyday Twitter users rallied to the cause of actress Rose McGowan late Thursday as they organized a 24-hour boycott of the website after the company suspended her account temporarily.The hashtag #WomenBoycottTwitter was the No. 1 trending topic in the United States into Friday morning as women -- and men -- pledged to go silent on Friday.McGowan, known for roles in Scream and the TV series Charmed, was briefly suspended from the service Wednesday over tweets about disgraced movie mogul Harvey Weinstein. Twitter said in a statement that her account was suspended because she included a private phone number."We have been in touch with Ms. McGowan's team," Twitter's statement read. "We want to explain that her account was temporarily locked because one of her Tweets included a private phone number, which violates our Terms of Service."The tweet was removed and her account has been unlocked. We will be clearer about these policies and decisions in the future." Many users took issue with Twitter's stated reason for suspending McGowan, noting that Donald Trump tweeted the phone number of Sen. Lindsey Graham in July 2015. And in November 2016, Lou Dobbs tweeted the phone number of a woman who accused Trump of groping. Neither was suspended.Journalists Natalie Shure and Mikki Kendall said they had reported multiple times about their numbers being shared without Twitter acting.After returning to Twitter, McGowan wrote, in complaints directed at Amazon's Jeff Bezos, that "HW" raped her, an apparent reference to Weinstein. She confirmed she was referring to the co-founder of Miramax in an interview with The Hollywood Reporter Thursday afternoon. Amazon Studios has two projects produced by The Weinstein Co. currently in development, and McGowan said she warned the head of Amazon Studios against getting involved with the company. “We are reviewing our options for the projects we have with The Weinstein Co.,” Amazon told The Hollywood Reporter this week.McGowan reached a $100,000 settlement with Weinstein after an alleged incident in a hotel room at the Sundance Film Festival in 1997, The New York Times reported.Weinstein has denied any allegations of nonconsensual sex. He was fired from his position with The Weinstein Co. earlier this week.McGowan retweeted an account calling for the boycott -- and using the hashtag -- at 6:47 p.m. Thursday. The movement took off from there.McGowan and quoted a tweet with the hashtag at midnight.She hasn't tweeted since 10:48 p.m. PT Thursday. Other celebrities jumped on the movement, including actress Alyssa Milano, model Chrissy Teigen, Roots bandleader Questlove, actor Mark Ruffalo, director Joss Whedon and actor Billy Eichner.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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