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  • @MaxMasseyTV/KSAT(SAN ANTONIO) -- At least 26 people were killed and 20 others were injured when a gunman stormed a church in rural Texas with a rifle this morning, Wilson County Sheriff Joe Tackitt and the Texas Department of Public Safety said.Victims' ages range from 5 to 72, authorities said. Texas Governor Greg Abbott called today's shooting in Sutherland Springs, about 40 miles southeast of San Antonio, the largest mass shooting in Texas history. The alleged shooter, a 26-year-old man, is also dead after the massacre at First Baptist Church, bringing the total number of fatalities to 27, authorities said.Here's what we know about the shooting:Tragedy at churchThe attack began at about 11:20 a.m., after a suspect was seen at a Valero gas station in Sutherland Springs, dressed in all black, the Department of Public Safety said. The suspect crossed the street to the church, got out of his vehicle and began firing at the church, authorities said.The suspect then moved to the right side of the church and continued to fire, before entering the church and shooting more, authorities said. As the suspect exited the church, a local resident grabbed his rifle and engaged the suspect, after which he dropped his assault-type rifle and fled, authorities said.A citizen pursued the suspect, authorities said.The suspect, who fled in a car, crashed and was later found dead in his vehicle in Guadalupe County, according to the sheriff and the Department of Public Safety. It's unclear whether he died from a self-inflicted gunshot wound or whether he was shot by another person, officials said at a news conference this afternoon at Stockdale City Hall, near the church. Multiple weapons were found in the vehicle, authorities said, adding that the suspect had tactical-type gear and was wearing a ballistic vest.The threat is believed to be over, Wilson County District Attorney Audrey Gossett said.Authorities did not discuss a motive at this afternoon's news conference. 14-year-old girl among the victimsAmong those killed was a 14-year-old girl named Annabelle Renee Pomeroy, according to her father, Frank Pomeroy, who is a pastor at the church.Annabelle “was one very beautiful, special child,” Pomeroy told ABC News by phone. Pomeroy said he was in Oklahoma this morning, a rare weekend that he wasn't at the church.The other victims are all close friends of his, he said.Last Sunday, Pomeroy delivered a sermon at the church, encouraging parishioners to "lean on the Lord," even when circumstances don't make sense."Trust in the Lord with all your heart and do not rely, or lean, on your own understanding," he said. "You see God's understanding is far greater and there may be things that are taking place that you don't understand but you still need to do what God's calling you to do." 'We heard several shots and we all started running'A woman who said she works at a gas station across the street from the church told ABC News she heard rapid gunfire around 11:15 a.m.Congregants fled the church and ran to the station cowering for cover, she said. “We heard several shots and we all started running inside the store,” said the woman, 49, though but declined to give her name.“It lasted about 15 seconds," she said. "I yelled, ‘Get down, get inside,' and we all went into hiding.”Within minutes of the gunfire, emergency personnel arrived at the scene, she said.A church turns into a crime scenePolice formed a perimeter around the First Baptist Church and flooded its grounds with emergency and police vehicles, according to ABC San Antonio affiliate KSAT-TV. Agents from the FBI and the federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives have responded to the scene. A small group of people were seen clustered together outside the small, white church, holding hands and attempting to pray, a KSAT reporter said. Paul Buford, a pastor at another church in Sutherland Springs, told KSAT his congregation was in the middle of
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Runners from across the country and around the world are competing in the New York City Marathon on Sunday, just five days after a truck attack killed eight people and wounded others in lower Manhattan.More than 51,000 people will participate in this year's marathon, while another 2.5 million spectators are expected to line New York City streets as the world-famous race takes runners through all five boroughs. The route begins on Staten Island, enters Manhattan via the Queensboro Bridge at East 59th St. and ends in Central Park.The marathon is taking place several miles north of the scene of Tuesday's deadly attack, in which a man driving a Home Depot truck plowed into pedestrians and cyclists on a busy bike path near West Houston Street and the West Side Highway. The suspect drove south for about a mile before crashing into a school bus near Chambers Street, just across from Stuyvesant High School, authorities said.He then emerged from the car with a paintball gun and a pellet gun, allegedly shouting "Allahu akbar," an Arabic phrase that translates to "God is greatest," before being shot in the abdomen by New York City Police Department Officer Ryan Nash, authorities said.The suspect, identified as 29-year-old Sayfullo Saipov, was transported to a hospital for treatment and is expected to survive. He is believed to have acted alone, authorities said.At a press conference Wednesday, New York City Police Department Chief Carlos Gomez announced the deployment of additional sand trucks, blocker vehicles, observation teams, rooftop observation posts and counter-sniper teams throughout Manhattan as well as the boroughs. There were also be heavy weapons teams at fixed locations along the race route that will be equipped with mobile response capabilities, in case they are needed elsewhere."It will be the most ever deployed at this event," Gomez said.In addition to regular uniformed police, there will be officers in civilian attire "mixing in with the crowds to detect any suspicious activity," Gomez said. K-9s and counterterrorism officers will also be deployed along the marathon route, as well as aviation patrols above.Meanwhile, the New York State Police and the New York National Guard will respectively double and triple personnel deployment throughout the city. The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey Police Department will more than double personnel deployment and add patrols at airports, bridges, tunnels and other high-profile locations.The New York State Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Services has activated the State Emergency Operations Center and is closely coordinating with local and federal officials. The Metropolitan Transportation Authority will add personnel and patrols at key locations throughout the city, including subways, buses, tunnels and bridges."Despite the cowardly attack in lower Manhattan this week, athletes from around the globe are flocking to this great city to run the New York City Marathon this weekend," New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said in a statement Saturday, laying out the enhanced security plans."While there is no apparent threat, we are ramping up security across New York City with patrols and resources from various state law enforcement agencies out of an abundance of caution. These brave men and women will be out in full force to ensure the safety of New Yorkers during tomorrow's marathon, and I look forward to another year of this storied New York tradition," Cuomo added.Authorities remind residents and tourists to stay alert to their surroundings and report any suspicious activity. Reports can be made by calling 911, by calling the NYC terrorism hotline at 1-888-NYC-SAFE or by calling the New York State Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Services' counterterrorism unit's tip line at 1-866SAFENYS or emailing ctcenter@nysic.ny.gov.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • John Greim/LightRocket via Getty Images(TALLAHASSEE, Fla.) -- The death of a fraternity pledge at Florida State University has sparked a police investigation and the suspension of the fraternal organization's local chapter, officials said.The student, 20-year-old Andrew Coffey, was found Friday morning around 10:23 a.m. ET after the Tallahassee Police Department received a call about an unresponsive person at a home on Buena Vista Drive.Coffey was pronounced dead at the scene, and an investigation into his death is ongoing, police said."We are overwhelmed with sadness any time we learn of the death of one of our students, and the FSU family provides extensive outreach to their family and friends as they mourn the loss of a young life," Amy Hecht, vice president for student affairs at Florida State University, said in a statement obtained by ABC News. "We do not yet have details surrounding the passing today of student Andrew Coffey, but we will work closely with the Tallahassee Police Department as it investigates to determine the facts surrounding this case.”Pi Kappa Phi fraternity spokesman Todd Shelton confirmed to ABC News that an "associate member" of the national organization's Beta Eta Chapter at Florida State University had died at an off-campus residence Friday. Shelton said all chapter operations are currently suspended and its members have been directed to fully cooperate with the death investigation.“Our thoughts and prayers are with the student’s family and friends,” Pi Kappa Phi CEO Mark E. Timmes said in a statement obtained by ABC News. “We appreciate the partnership and support from the Division of Student Affairs during this difficult time.” Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • Spencer Platt/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- Former Democratic congressman Anthony Weiner, who was sentenced to 21 to 27 months in prison for sending obscene material to a 15-year-old North Carolina high school student, must report to federal prison by Monday, WABC-TV reported Friday.Weiner, 53, who pleaded guilty last May to a single count of transferring obscene material to a minor, was also sentenced to three years of supervised release.The disgraced politician will serve his time in Massachusetts at the Federal Medical Center, Devens, located about 40 miles west of Boston. The facility houses more than 1,100 male inmates who require medical or mental health care. It also offers sex offender treatment.At his sentencing in September, Judge Denise Cote said, "This is a serious crime that deserves serious punishment."At the time, Acting Manhattan U.S. Attorney Joon H. Kim said in a statement, "Anthony Weiner, a former congressman and candidate for mayor, asked a girl who he knew to be 15-years-old to display her naked body and engage in sexually explicit behavior for him online. Justice demands that this type of conduct be prosecuted and punished with time in prison. Today, Anthony Weiner received a just sentence that was appropriate for his crime."The sentencing marked the end of a six-year saga during which Weiner resigned from Congress; unsuccessfully ran for mayor of New York; and separated from Hillary Clinton aide Huma Abedin, who filed for divorce the day he was indicted. Weiner and Abedin are parents to a young son.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • ABC(NEW YORK) --  A 17-year-old who was injured in the deadly terrorist attack Tuesday in lower Manhattan went to school the next day “because he was working on 100 percent perfect attendance," New York City Schools Chancellor Carmen Fariña said.The teen was on a school bus when it was struck by the suspect's truck just across from Stuyvesant High School.The collision left the school bus mangled. Another student on that school bus, a 14-year-old girl, was injured, suffering a fractured hip, internal bleeding and a laceration to the liver. Two adults on the bus were also injured.The teen, Noah Salz, and his parents spoke to New York ABC station WABC on Thursday and he said he remembered the whole crash and ensuing chaos."I heard a loud crash sound and the bus matron landed right on me," said Noah.His father, David, works in 7 World Trade Center and went to New York-Presbyterian Lower Manhattan Hospital to pick up his son, knowing nothing of the attack at the time."I was able to call Noah and was able to talk to him briefly, and then I saw him on a stretcher on Channel 7, so that was a real odd moment," said David, who was in the hospital waiting room at the time. "It lasted long enough, he was on a stretcher, and he seemed OK."Eight people were killed and 12 others were injured in the attack, which started when the suspect mowed people down on a bike path. A police officer shot and injured the suspect, ending the threat.Fariña said she talked to the injured 17-year-old who returned to school. He told her, “I told myself I’m going to be fine because a lot of people want to help me.”When asked by WABC why he wanted to return the next day, Salz offered a simple answer."Because I wanted to go, because I wasn't hurt and I wasn't injured," Noah said.New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio visited Thursday morning with students and school officials at Stuyvesant High School, including a teacher who was on the bike path at the time of the attack. That teacher was injured but still went to work the following day, the mayor said.After the incident, the students at Stuyvesant High School thought it was "their duty to be back" at school to mourn those who were lost and to show that “terror would not stop us," de Blasio said.The mayor said it "very moving" to hear teenagers think about their responsibility to respond to an act of terrorism.De Blasio, who spoke to the media this morning after visiting the school, told reporters that everyone at the school "handled a very tough situation exceptionally well.""The training and preparation worked," he said of the school security protocols. "They called the alert immediately to shelter in place and students could tell it was not a drill. ... No one stopped and questioned.”De Blasio said while the school was on lockdown, "students of all backgrounds, every nationality, every faith," were checking on each other and supporting each other. De Blasio said students told him they had great faith that all the adults in the building were protecting them.Overall, the solidarity in the school was very evident, the mayor said. "Everyone had each other’s backs and they knew they had to be there for each other," de Blasio said. "And no one, no one, expressed to us a sense of fear or insecurity. They simply were resolute. And it was very very admirable."The man suspected of plowing into the victims is 29-year-old Sayfullo Saipov. He allegedly was inspired by ISIS videos he watched on his cellphone, according to the criminal complaint against him. Saipov was charged Wednesday with providing support to ISIS and violence and destruction of motor vehicles.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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