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  • Joe Raedle/Getty Images(PARKLAND, Fla.) -- When he and his classmates came face to face with a gunman shooting up their Florida school, Anthony Borges put the lives of others before his own, a friend who survived because of the teenager told ABC News.A soccer player at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, 15-year-old Anthony placed his body between alleged mass killer Nikolas Cruz and fellow students, according to Carlos Rodriguez, who said he survived because of Anthony's heroism."None of us knew what to do, so he took the initiative to just save his other classmates," Carlos, Anthony's best friend, told ABC's "Good Morning America."As gunfire erupted on Wednesday in the halls of Building 12 at the Parkland, Florida, school, Anthony and his classmates rushed to hide in a classroom as the gunman bore down on them, firing randomly and rapidly at students, Carlos said.Anthony was the last of 20 students who fled into a room and was trying to lock the door when he was shot, Carlos said. He held his ground in the doorway, putting his body between the bullets and his classmates, who all survived uninjured, Carlos said.Anthony was shot four times, taking bullets to the back and both legs, but survived, his father said.Royer Borges told ABC News that his son called him shortly after the attack and described the massacre at his school that left 17 people dead."He just called me and says, 'Dad, somebody shot me in the back and my leg, too," said the father, breaking into tears.Royer Borges said he has heard of the courageous selflessness his son showed and expressed pride in his boy."He's my hero," he said.Royer Borges said his son is in a hospital in stable condition after undergoing hours of surgery."I only ask that people pray for him," he said.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • ABC News(PARKLAND, Fla.) -- A survivor of the Florida school massacre last week that killed 17 students and teachers said that as she heard shots ring out at her school, she thought of her family and the life she always thought lay ahead of her."All I could think of was my family," Lauren Hogg told ABC News' This Week Co-Anchor Martha Raddatz on Sunday. "I thought of things I haven’t done. I’m 14 -- I haven’t even driven yet."She said she also thought of her brother, David, 17, also a student at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Broward County, Florida.“He’s my best friend. I was just so scared of losing him,” she said.Lauren, who later learned that four friends died in the shooting, said she was hearing from classmates on her phone as the rampage unfolded."We got a text, and it would be, 'Are you guys OK? Are those gunshots? Did somebody just hear gunshots? What’s happening?'" she said. "And then another person would text, 'I hear somebody coming down the hall, there’s kids screaming.'"Lauren's brother, David, and their mother, Rebecca Boldrick, who teaches in the Broward County school system, also talked to Raddatz on Sunday.David said he wasn't able to receive his sister's texts during the shooting. "It was awful," he said.“I was thinking of a million things at once" as it occurred, he said. "I was also thinking if I was going to die in here, if this was my last moment, I was going to die doing what I love, and that’s telling people’s stories and stories that matter.”So, as shots rang out in the school, David interviewed classmates and recorded them talking about gun violence and gun control.“This is the story that I thought mattered the most because if we died," he said, adding, "Even though our souls wouldn’t carry on, our voices would."Raddatz asked Lauren how she found out her friends were among the victims."Well, we were still hiding in the class," she said. "There were rumors getting texted around, and there’s texts going around that said, 'I heard this person’s dead, I heard this person, I saw them shot on the floor."Laure added, "I can’t handle it. I lost four friends, yes.""Four friends," Raddatz said."Jaime Guttenburg, Alaina Petty, Alyssa Alhadeff and Gina Montalto," Lauren said. "We sat next to each other in class. We spent days on end just talking about what we want to do when we grow up, where we want to go to college -- and now it’s just gone."Lauren and David's mother, Boldrick, said of school shootings, “You never think it will happen to you.""You see it on the news, you think, ‘How sad. Oh, those Sandy Hook parents -- their babies are gone,” she continued, referring to the December 2012 massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary school in Newtown, Connecticut, that killed 20 first-graders and six staff and teachers. “You never, ever think it will be you.”One mom whose son died in a prior mass shooting said some parents whose children were killed at Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland may at first have trouble coping with the reality.“A lot of them are probably in some very strong denial,” Christine Leinonen, whose son, Christopher, was among 49 killed in the Pulse nightclub shooting in Orlando in 2016, told Raddatz on Sunday. “It's a good thing to have denial because it does get you through the reality. ... The reality is so horrific."Parents suffering such a sudden, violent loss are “in a war zone," Leinonen said. "They have now been put into a battlefield that they didn’t train for, they didn’t enlist for, they have no equipment for -- but yet here they are in a battlefield.”Leinonen went looking for her son in the wake of the Pulse shooting, but it was 33 hours before she found out he was among the dead.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- Teen survivors of the school shooting massacre in Florida are calling for a march on Washington to demand action on gun control.Student organizers of the protest told ABC News' "This Week" Co-Anchor Martha Raddatz on Sunday that they are determined to use protests and political action to make the mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas in Parkland, Florida, a turning point in the national debate over gun control.“People keep asking us, 'What about the Stoneman Douglas shooting is going to be different, because this has happened before and change hasn't come?” Cameron Kasky, an 11th-grader told Raddatz. “This is it.”Called "March for Our Lives," the demonstration in Washington is scheduled for March 24, according to Kasky and four of his classmates whom Raddatz interviewed. They are Emma Gonzalez, David Hogg, Alex Wind and Jaclyn Corin.In addition to the march in Washington, the organizers are planning protests in other cities around the country.“This isn’t about the GOP," Kasky said. "This isn’t about the Democrats."“Any politician on either side who is taking money from the NRA is responsible for events like this,” the high school junior said of the shooting on Feb. 14 that killed 17 students and teachers at the school. “At the end of the day, the NRA is fostering and promoting this gun culture.”Kasky said the point is to "create a new normal where there's a badge of shame on any politician who's accepting money from the NRA.”Gonzalez added that the student activists from Parkland want to have conversations about guns with President Donald Trump; Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla.; and Gov. Rick Scott, also a Republican.“We want to give them the opportunity to be on the right side of this,” she said.Raddatz asked Gonzales what she would say to other students around the country to encourage them to join the protest.The high school senior said all students should realize that a school shooting could happen anywhere."This can very quickly happen to them,” Gonzalez said. “They need to join us, and they need to help us get our message across.”Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • ABC News(NEW YORK) -- The warmest temperatures since November are headed for parts of the Northeast this week.Temperatures from New York to Boston will be in the 40s on Sunday. The Ohio Valley and Gulf Coast will see 70s on Tuesday, with that warmth sliding east a day later as temperatures may reach 15 to 20 degrees above normal.New York may see 70 degrees on Wednesday, which would be the highest temperature in the city since it touched 74 on Nov. 3. In the longer term, temperatures in the eastern U.S. may remain above average for another week or two.A strong storm in the Pacific Northwest on Saturday knocked out power lines and downed trees in northwest Washington. Wind gusts near Seattle reached almost 50 mph. Nearby mountains saw heavy snowfall.Another cold-pressure system developing in the Northwest is expected to bring with it the coldest air of the season for much of the West Coast. The lowlands of Washington and Oregon are expecting more snow Sunday morning, and Seattle and Portland may see 1-2 inches through Sunday. Parts of the Rockies and Cascades may see 1-2 feet.By Monday morning, lows will dip to the low 20s across the Northwest. By Tuesday, wind chills in the 30s will creep all the way down to San Francisco and Los Angeles as parts of the northern plains see lows approach minus 30.A system moving through the Rockies will bring more precipitation from Colorado to Minnesota, as parts of Kansas and Wisconsin see a wintry mix.Heavy rain is expected from Texas to Michigan later in the week, bringing with it moderate concern of a flash flood in the region. A state of emergency was declared in West Virginia on Saturday because of excessive flooding.Significant parts of the U.S. may get 5-7 inches of rainfall by the middle of the week. Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • Joe Raedle/Getty Images(FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla.) -- Teen survivors of the shooting massacre at a Florida high school this week were among the speakers at a rally for firearm-safety legislation that drew a passionate, sign-waving crowd of hundreds of gun control supporters in Fort Lauderdale.Emma Gonzalez, a student at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School where 17 students and staff were killed Wednesday, wiped tears as she urged the audience at the Saturday rally to fight for firearms restrictions to help prevent further mass shootings.After Gonzalez slammed politicians who accept contributions from the NRA, saying they should be ashamed, the crowd began loudly chanting, “Shame on you! Shame on you!”The student said she and her classmates in AP classes at the high school often debated gun control and were discussing it even as the shooting broke out Wednesday.But she like other students who spoke at the rally said the time for talk is over and now elected officials must take action or the public will.“If all our government and president can do is send thoughts and prayers then it’s time for victims to be the change we need to be,” Gonzalez said.Another student from the high school, David Hogg, urged the crowd: “Get out there and vote.”Even beyond voting, Hogg said, "Run for office.'The rally at the federal courthouse in Fort Lauderdale was sponsored by gun-control advocacy groups such as Moms Demand Action as well as other organizations including the PTA, the League of Women Voters, Women's March Florida and the Broward Teachers Union.Delaney Tarr, a classmate of Hogg and Gonzalez, told the rapt audience that the gun laws that allegedly allowed 19-year-old suspect Nikolas Cruz to buy an AR-15 rifle make no sense."Because of these gun laws, people I love have died," Tarr said. "Where's the common sense in that? People are dying every day."
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