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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- The travel forecast across much of the country for one of the busiest travel days of the year will be quiet with minimal travel disruptions on the road and in the air.The main trouble spot will be in the Pacific Northwest, where several storms have brought heavy rain to the area this week. It will continue Wednesday with possible flooding and flight delays.Anyone traveling early Wednesday morning in the Northeast could face some issues, with snow for the interior areas and rain showers from New York City to Boston. However, it will clear out by the afternoon.Elsewhere, the rest of the country will be mostly sunny and dry with easy travel weather.Wet early in NortheastA cold front is making its way into the Northeast Wednesday with colder air behind the front and milder air ahead of it.The cold air is creating light snow for parts of Pennsylvania and western New York early Wednesday morning, and that will move into interior New England later. Any snow should be confined to northern interior Maine by the afternoon.ABC meteorologists are also tracking the rain ahead of the front with some heavy showers happening in eastern North Carolina -- mainly the Outer Banks -- and moving up the coast through Wednesday morning.Washington D.C. should stay mostly dry, with some light rain anticipated for New York City between 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Then rain moves into Boston, lingering there through the early afternoon. Overall, this could bring minor travel impacts to the area Wednesday morning.Cold weather coming nextBehind that front is another cold blast. Although widespread record lows are not expected, wind chills will still be quite cold for the Midwest Wednesday morning and the Northeast by Thanksgiving morning.Wind chills are in the teens and even single digits across the Midwest early Wednesday, and it feels like only 15 degrees in Chicago and 9 degrees in Minneapolis.By Thursday, morning wind chills will be in the 20s from New York City to Boston.It will be cold for the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade, but winds look light with lots of sunshine.Northwest continues to see rainA flood watch remains in effect for northwest Washington, including Seattle, Wednesday through Thursday afternoon. Rainfall totals of 2 to 5 inches have already fallen, and an additional 1 to 3 inches is possible, with storm totals of over 7 inches of rain this week.Due to all the rain from these storms, minor flooding is possible for rivers in the area. The rain will also bring slick and wet roads for travelers.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • Connecticut State Police(WATERBURY, Conn.) -- A driver fleeing from authorities hit and killed a toddler in Connecticut on Tuesday afternoon, police said.The incident occurred in Waterbury, where local police officers in an unmarked vehicle attempted to stop a suspect of a criminal investigation on Tuesday around 3:45 p.m. ET. The suspect, identified as 18-year-old Zekhi Eric Lee of Waterbury, failed to pull over his Acura, and fled from officers, according to Connecticut State Police.Lee collided with a Toyota Corolla at an intersection and veered off the road onto the sidewalk, striking four pedestrians and knocking down a light pole, state police said.After crashing his vehicle, Lee fled on foot but was apprehended by Waterbury police officers a short time later and taken into custody, according to state police.Five people were transported to local hospitals for injuries related to the incident, including a 19-month-old girl. A 3-year-old boy was taken to the hospital, where he was pronounced dead, according to state police.Connecticut State Police detectives are investigating the fatal crash.Police said anyone with information about the incident should contact Western District Major Crime Detective Ed Vayan at 203-267-2200 or text TIP711 with any information to 274637. All calls and texts will be kept confidential, authorities said.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- A young Australian diplomat fell to his death from a New York City building early Wednesday, police said, reportedly as he played a trust game on a ledge.Julian Simpson, 30, was on the seventh floor of a Lower East Side building with his wife and others when he fell, landing on a second-floor terrace, New York City police said. He was pronounced dead at a local hospital.There's no apparent criminality, police said.Minister for Foreign Affairs Julie Bishop said in a statement on Thursday, "I extend my condolences to the family and loved ones of Julian Simpson," saying his death occurred "in tragic circumstances in New York.""Julian was a diligent, professional and highly skilled diplomat, whose support I valued, particularly during U.N. Leaders’ Week. He will be remembered as someone dedicated to the service of our nation as a member of Australia’s foreign service," Bishop said. "The Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade will continue to provide support to Julian’s family, and to other Australian diplomats in New York who have lost a valued colleague."Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(COLUMBIA, S.C.) -- Mayor Steve Benjamin of Columbia, South Carolina, said he plans to introduce a city ordinance that would ban "bump stocks" and "trigger cranks" like the ones used in the deadly Las Vegas massacre last month.“I believe in responsible gun ownership, and I believe in common sense,” Benjamin said in a statement announcing the ordinance on Wednesday. “That’s why I’ve decided to do what our federal and state governments are either unable or unwilling to do."“The simple fact is that automatic weapons have been illegal in this country for more than 30 years, and the only purpose these devices serve is to circumvent that law multiplying firing rates tenfold to approximately 400-800 rounds per minute and turning a semi-automatic firearm into a mass-murder machine,” he added.He did not lay out a timeline for the ordinance, but he is set to hold a news conference Thursday afternoon to provide more details about the plan.Benjamin's statement echoed similar ones made by some South Carolina legislatures who have advocated for a statewide ban.Earlier this month, South Carolina Reps. Leon Stavrinakis, Michael Sottile and Gary Clary said they had drafted a bill to ban bump stocks for the legislature to consider when it reconvenes in January. Stavrinakis is a Democrat, while Sottile and Clary are Republicans."Simply put, the use of bump stocks is a loophole that allows legal firearms to replicate illegal ones," Stavrinakis said in a press release last month when he announced the forthcoming bill. "As we have so unfortunately now learned, in the wrong hands, bump stocks can be a tool for mass murder."These devices can turn our community into a killing field where neither civilians nor law enforcement has a chance in the line of fire."Benjamin’s announcement came less than two months after 64-year-old Stephen Paddock opened fire Oct. 1 from the 32nd floor of Las Vegas’ Mandalay Bay hotel and casino, killing 58 people and injuring hundreds of others.Paddock used bump stocks, which allow semi-automatic rifles to mimic fully automatic weapons, to modify some of the weapons used in the attack. The modification enabled him to fire as many as nine rounds per second, according to one estimate, in an attack that lasted between nine and 11 minutes.Last month, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives confirmed that Paddock had 12 bump stocks attached to rifles in his hotel room.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • Google Earth/ABC News(SACRAMENTO) -- Five people were killed in a shooting rampage in northern California, including the gunman's wife, whose death appeared to have kicked off the rampage, authorities said.The shootings continued Tuesday morning at multiple locations, including an elementary school.The shootings, which took place about 130 miles north of Sacramento, left five people dead and several more wounded. No children were killed, but seven children were injured, with injuries ranging from very minor to life-threatening, authorities said.The gunman, identified by authorities Wednesday as Kevin Neal, was killed by police.On Tuesday night, Neal's wife was found dead from several gunshot wounds, said Phil Johnston, Tehama County assistant sheriff. Johnston said she was probably shot late Monday. Her body was found covered up under the floor, and it appears her death is what started the shooting spree, Johnston said.Johnston added that law enforcement had a history with Neal and said he was out on bail for an assault with a deadly weapon arrest from January.Here's what we know about how the 45-minute shooting rampage unfolded, according to authorities:-- Following the death of Neal's wife, the shootings started just before 8 a.m. PT with random shots fired into residences, authorities said.-- The suspect then engaged a citizen who followed him before allegedly stealing the citizen's car, police said.--The gunman "arbitrarily" shot at residents in the rural area as he drove by, said Phil Johnston, Tehama County assistant sheriff.-- Shortly after, the gunman engaged with a woman who was taking her two children to school. He allegedly opened fire on them at an intersection, authorities said. The mother suffered life-threatening injuries from the shooting, and one of her children sustained nonlife-threatening injuries, police said.-- The gunman then turned his sights to the Rancho Tehama Elementary School. Before classes began, the gunman, armed with a semi-automatic rifle, crashed a vehicle through the school’s locked gate and fired dozens of shots at the school, damaging windows and walls, according to the school district and police.One student was shot. The school district said late Tuesday the student was in stable condition. There were also injuries from broken glass, the school district said.The gunman spent about six minutes there, Johnston said. Authorities said it appeared the gunman became frustrated when he could not gain entry to the classrooms, so he got back into the vehicle and left.-- The gunman allegedly went back on the road, and shot and killed one person, Johnston said.-- After that, the suspect allegedly crashed the stolen car, robbed someone and took a second vehicle, authorities said.-- The armed suspect engaged two officers and they returned fire, killing the suspect at the scene, according to police.
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