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  • iStock/Thinkstock(LAS VEGAS) -- Paige Gasper came close to becoming one of gunman Stephen Paddock's victims when he shot into a crowd of 22,000 at a Las Vegas country music festival headlined by Jason Aldean last week.Fifty-eight people were killed in the massacre, and hundreds, like Gasper, were wounded.Luckily, the 21-year-old Sonoma State University student beat death in the nation's worst mass shooting in modern history with the aid of Good Samaritans who pulled her body into a pickup truck and transported her to a hospital.Now, Gasper, of Wheatland, California, is suing the hotel, the concert organizers, bump stock manufacturers and retailers as well as the "Estate of Stephen Paddock" for “negligence” in failing to prevent Paddock's 11-minute terrorizing rampage.She filed the lawsuit Tuesday in Clark County, Nevada.Gasper's lawsuit alleges MGM Resorts International and its subsidiary Mandalay Corp., which own the hotel, and failed to properly monitor Paddock's activities and responded too late to the shooting of a hotel security officer. According to the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department, Paddock fired at the security officer six minutes before opening fire on the crowd below.The lawsuit also accuses Live Nation Entertainment, Inc., the festival organizer, and unnamed event promotion companies of negligence for failing to provide adequate exits for festival-goers. The lawsuit also alleges Live Nation was negligent for improperly training staff for an emergency.Another defendant named in the suit is Slide Fire Solutions, the maker of bump stock devices that Las Vegas officials claims were used by Paddock, of negligence, design and manufacturing defects.At a press conference Wednesday, one of Gasper's attorneys, Michelle Tuegel, said the lawsuit was filed in order get "action and answers."Also present was Gasper's mother Heather Selken who explained the impetus for the lawsuit: "[We] want things put in place so this won't happen to you or your family," she said. MGM Resorts spokeswoman Debra DeShong responded to the lawsuit in a statement to ABC News, and said, "As our company and city work through the healing process, our primary focus and concern is taking actions to support the victims and their families, our guests and employees and cooperating with law enforcement ... Out of respect for the victims we are not going to try this case in the public domain and we will give our response through the appropriate legal channels."A Live Nation rep said in a statement to ABC News that the company is "heartbroken" for the victims and their families and it is working with the FBI but it is "unable to comment specifically on pending litigation."Messages left by ABC News for Slide Fire were not immediately returned.And messages left by ABC News for an attorney representing Paddock's girlfriend, Marilou Danley, have also not been returned.It is unclear if Paddock's family has retained an attorney.As Paddock, the 64-year-old retired accountant and video poker playing high-roller was in his room on the 32nd floor of the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino making preparations for the shooting on the night of Oct. 1, Gasper was taking in the third day of the Route 91 Harvest Festival in the Las Vegas Village.For 11 minutes, Paddock, after busting through two windows, showered the staging grounds with volleys of bullets, police have confirmed.One bullet, according to the lawsuit, “believed to be from the weapon of Paddock” struck Gasper by entering her right underarm then “traversed right breast tissue, shattered ribs and lacerated her liver before exiting out her right side.”After suffering the bullet wound, Gasper, the lawsuit adds, “was rendered physically incapacitated as a result of her injuries” and inadvertently trampled by friends and escaping crowds of people “as they tried to flee the concert venue.”Fortunately, Gasper was aided to safety by numerous Good Samaritans.O
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(LAS VEGAS) -- The brother of the suspected Las Vegas shooter said he and his family feel like an "asteroid just fell on us.""We have no idea how or why this happened," Eric Paddock, the brother of suspect Stephen Paddock, told ABC News.Stephen Paddock killed himself before authorities entered the hotel room from which he is believed to have fired shots that killed at least 50 people and injured more than 400 others, Las Vegas police said Monday."We don't understand," Eric Paddock said, adding they are "dumbstruck" by the "unbelievable” incident.There is "exactly no reason for this” and there are "no secrets in his past,” Eric Paddock said of his brother."As they drill into his life, there will be nothing to be found," Paddock said of the ensuing investigation into his brother.Police questioned the suspect’s girlfriend, Marilou Danley, 62, who appears to have lived with Paddock in Mesquite, Nevada, about 80 miles northeast of Las Vegas, but authorities told ABC News they do not believe she was involved in the shooting.Eric Paddock confirmed that Danley was his brother's girlfriend and said that "she is a nice lady.""I can’t imagine she would know anything of something like this," Paddock said.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • Science Photo Library - NOAA/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- An essential hurricane tracking jet has repeatedly experienced technical issues, preventing it from completing crucial fact finding missions, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).The information gathered by the gulfstream jet improves hurricane track forecasts by about 20 percent on average, NOAA said. The system failure of the jet is of special concern to researchers and lawmakers, because there is no backup airliner.The jet most recently encountered issues while flying through Hurricane Maria.“NOAA's G-IV aircraft experienced a problem with the fuel ignition system on one of its two jet engines, resulting in the cancellation of a hurricane surveillance mission set for 1:30 p.m. on Sept. 24, ”NOAA wrote in a statement to ABC News.On Sept. 25, the seal on the cabin door failed -- a repeat of an earlier incident that occurred during a flight through Hurricane Jose, as reported by the Washington Post.“The G-IV crew detected a sound indicating a leak in the main cabin door seal, a repeat of an earlier issue thought to have been successfully repaired,” the statement detailed, adding, “the crew immediately ended the mission.”The sole aircraft collects data for hurricane forecasts and is a much needed resource in the thick of the most serious month for hurricanes ever recorded. In the last eight days, three flights were terminated.NOAA claims it's a common wear-and-tear issue with pressurization, but it is not clear yet why the failures occurred in such quick succession.Since Monday, the vital jet hasn’t been in service.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- A pair of sinkholes have opened up in a central Florida neighborhood after hurricane Irma hit the state earlier this month.Tuesday morning, a huge sinkhole swallowed part of a home in Apopka, Florida, a city 18 miles northwest of Orlando.Luckily, the residents, Ellen and Garry Miller, were not injured in that sinkhole."We made it through the hurricane. We were really, really lucky, and then this," Miller told ABC-affiliate WFTV. "This is the only home I know. It's the only home my kids know."Unfortunately, the Millers are not alone in their plight, as just down the street from them, another sinkhole formed yesterday.The newest sinkhole is about 30 feet wide, according to an Orange County Fire Rescue spokesperson, and is about 100 feet from a house. Officials told WFTV the residents are not being asked to evacuate and should simply monitor the sinkhole situation.  Dave Carpenter lives near the newest sinkhole and told WFTV he's distressed by it."You'd have to be crazy not to be worried about it if one opens right next door to you," Carpenter told WFTV.It's not yet clear if Irma can be blamed for the sinkholes, but a local expert said they tend to show up after hurricanes.“When you have heavy rains, the chances of sinkholes [appearing goes] up quite a bit,” Dr. Manoj Chopra, a University of Central Florida engineering professor, told WFTV. Chopra told WFTV he expects more sinkholes will form throughout the state in the coming weeks.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Tropical Storm Harvey, which first made landfall Friday as hurricane before weakening into a persistent storm that has circled over southeastern Texas for days, has shattered the U.S. rainfall record for a tropical storm, according to the National Weather Service.Breaking the previous mark of 48 inches, Harvey recorded 49.2 inches at an area called Mary's Creek at Winding Road, Texas, the weather service reported. Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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