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  • kodda/iStock/Thinkstock(AMHERST, S.D.) -- Some 210,000 gallons of oil leaked from the Keystone pipeline in South Dakota, TransCanada, the owner of the pipeline, said on Thursday.The company said it shut down the flow of oil on the pipeline at 6 a.m., "after a drop in pressure was detected in its operating system resulting from an oil leak that is under investigation."The leak took place some 35 miles south of the Ludden pump station in Marshall County, South Dakota, the company said in a press release.TransCanada said the leak was "completely isolated within 15 minutes and emergency response procedures were activated.""The safety of the public and environment are our top priorities and we will continue to provide updates as they become available," the press release added.A proposed extension of the pipeline, known as Keystone XL, has been mired in controversy for years. The Trump administration approved the long-delayed 1,179-mile project in March of this year. The proposal was hotly debated and pitted environmentalists against proponents who said it would promote energy independence.The Obama administration previously rejected the proposed pipeline, which would carry crude from Canada through Montana and South Dakota to Nebraska.Nebraska's Public Service Commission is due to rule in the coming days on a permit that would allow Keystone XL to move forward.
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  • Ingram Publishing/Thinkstock(SAN FRANCISCO) -- The 59-year-old psychiatric patient who was on the lam for four days after escaping the Hawaii State Hospital said he left as an "act of desperation."In 1981, Randall Saito had been committed to the hospital in Kaneohe, just outside Honolulu, after he was acquitted of first-degree murder by reason of insanity. He had been missing for 10 hours by the time hospital staff alerted authorities, who then warned the public that Saito was "extremely dangerous and should not be approached."Saito described the mental health facility as "hell in a handbasket," adding that he was spurred to flee because "patients' rights were being denied" in an interview with ABC San Francisco station KGO from the San Joaquin County Jail in French Camp, California, Thursday, one day after he was apprehended in nearby Stockton."I don't want to be in the state hospital," he said. "I'm not safe there."Hawaii's Department of Health, which runs the Hawaii State Hospital, did not immediately respond to ABC News' request for comment.Saito escaped the mental health facility Sunday morning on Oahu and was captured in Stockton, California, three days later. He had been missing for 10 hours by the time hospital staff alerted authorities, Hawaii Gov. David Y. Ige said.Seven hospital workers have been relieved of their duties without pay while officials investigate the incident, officials said.Saito is currently awaiting extradition from California. If he makes the $500,000 bond once back in Hawaii, he will be placed back into the hospital's custody, officials said.Saito was able to make his escape with $6,000 he had in cash as well as a "bogus" driver's license that featured his photograph but an alias for the name, he said, declining to reveal how he obtained the identification or the money.While the hospital has security guards and surveillance cameras, there is no "fencing all around" the campus, Saito said."It's a hospital, not a prison," he said.Hawaii Department of Health Director Dr. Ginny Pressler said at a press conference Wednesday afternoon that Saito's escape was a "result of a major breakdown" in staff protocols, procedures and guidelines at the hospital. An initial internal investigation revealed that staff "may have inadvertently or purposely neglected" to notify supervisors of the incident, Pressler added.Saito did not have a plan in place for after he left the hospital grounds, he said. He chartered a small plane from a private company to go from Honolulu to Maui, and from there, he chose the cheapest ticket out -- to San Jose, California.Once he landed in San Jose, he spent the night in a hotel and tried to "get" himself "together," he said."I couldn't believe I actually made it," Saito said. It was surreal."Saito spent Monday traveling around San Jose looking for a car to buy, but couldn't find a good enough deal, he said.When the cab driver asked him where he wanted to go, he chose Stockton "off the top of his head," and he ended up staying there until he was caught on Wednesday morning.Saito said he mostly stayed in his hotel room, which he noticed was right across the street from where local police officers would fill up their squad cars.He had traveled to Walmart to buy a phone, but later found it was defective, he said. On Wednesday, he said he called a cab and asked the driver to take him back to Walmart so he could exchange it. When the store wouldn't accept the defective phone due to a lack of a receipt, the driver asked Saito where he wanted to go next, Saito said.When the driver told him that he would fill up his tank first, Saito knew it was a setup, he said."I started laughing, because I knew," he said.Saito went inside the gas station store, and when he returned to the cab, he saw the police officers waiting to apprehend him, he said.The San Joaquin County Sheriff's Office said the tip from the taxi cab driver is what led authorities to Saito.Saito said he escaped to prove he could exist
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  • MaggyMeyer/iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- U.S. wildlife officials began issuing permits for lion trophies hunted in Zambia and Zimbabwe about a month ago, ABC News confirmed Thursday.U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service officials said the decision was made after concluding that regulated hunting would help the survival of the endangered species in the wild.The African lion population has decreased 42 percent in the past 20 years, according to the African Wildlife Foundation. The officials did not provide any additional details about what new information led to the decision to issue permits to import lion trophies from those countries. The Fish and Wildfire Service said it takes at least 45 days to get a permit approved so it’s unclear if any have been granted since they began accepting applications.In 2016, the Fish and Wildlife Service placed African lions on the endangered species list for the first time due to the "dramatic decline of lion populations in the wild." The designation says that imports of African lions will "generally be prohibited" but still allows the government to issue permits to import the species "such as when it can be found that the import will enhance the survival of the species." There are an estimated 17,000 - 19,000 African lions remaining in the wild.In addition to Zambia and Zimbabwe, the government allows permits for wild lions and lions from managed areas in South Africa and is reviewing policies about importing lion trophies from Mozambique, Namibia, and Tanzania.A U.S. Fish and Wildlife spokesperson said they found that "legal, well-regulated sport hunting" can benefit conservation by providing incentives to local communities and generating revenue that can be directed to conservation programs, saying that the programs in Zambia and Zimbabwe will enhance the survival of the species in the wild. They began issuing permits to import lion trophies on Oct. 20.The administration also announced this week that it would allow permits to import trophies from elephants killed in Zimbabwe and Zambia.Conservation and animal advocates dispute that the money brought in by hunting tourists and fees really helps conservation, saying that more money is brought in by people who want to see animals alive in the wild."African elephants and African lions drive billions of dollars of economic activity in Africa. But they drive that activity only when they are alive," Wayne Pacelle, president of the Humane Society of the United States wrote in a blog post tonight. "Killing them deducts from their populations, diminishes wildlife-watching experiences for others, and robs the countries of Africa of its greatest resources."In addition to Zambia and Zimbabwe the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service allows permits to import trophies from hunted wild lions and lions from managed areas in South Africa and is reviewing policies about importing lion trophies from Mozambique, Namibia, and Tanzania.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • shiyali/iStock/Thinkstock(TAMPA, Fla.) -- The reward to help find a killer on the loose in Tampa, Florida, has increased to $100,000 as investigators search for answers.A string of unsolved killings in the Seminole Heights neighborhood has left the community on edge. Four people have been shot and killed within blocks of one another in just six weeks.The reward for information leading to an arrest stood at $91,000 until Tampa restaurateur Richard Gonzmart pledged $9,000 on Thursday. Law enforcement partners have contributed $85,000 and the community has raised more than $6,000, according to the Tampa Police Department."The support from the community and our law enforcement partners has been inspiring," Tampa Police Chief Brian Dugan said in a statement Thursday. "I can't thank them enough for stepping up. The reward money is truly impressive, and that's only one of the many ways that people are showing their support."The first three victims were killed within 11 days in October. Benjamin Mitchell, 22, was killed on Oct. 9 and then the body of 32-year-old Monica Hoffa was found on Oct. 13, just half a mile from where Mitchell was killed. Anthony Naiboa, a 20-year-old man authorities described as having "mild autism," was killed on Oct. 19 after taking the wrong bus home from work, according to police.Early Tuesday, Robert Felton, 60, was shot to death from behind in the Seminole Heights neighborhood. Investigators consider Felton to be a fourth victim in the series of murders.“We are treating it as though it is related until we rule otherwise,” Dugan told reporters Tuesday morning.The suspect in Felton's shooting has been described by witnesses as a tall, slim black man with a light complexion, clad in all black clothing and armed with a large black pistol, according to police.Investigators are not calling the suspect a serial killer because they can't yet determine whether the same individual committed all the killings. Still, Dugan said police are "pretty convinced" that the suspect was involved in the deaths of at least Mitchell and Felton."Finding this killer is a community effort," Tampa Mayor Bob Buckhorn said in a statement Thursday. "We need to and will find who's committing these heinous, senseless murders and when we do, it will be because of people like Richard, the Seminole Heights community, Tampa Police Department and our partners in the law enforcement community who have poured their blood, sweat and tears into bringing this killer to justice." Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • aijohn784/iStock/Thinkstock(RALEIGH-DURHAM, N.C.) -- The sister of the suspected gunman who went on a shooting rampage at several northern California locations Tuesday said his mental health had been deteriorating for years.In an emotional interview, North Carolina resident Sheridan Orr told ABC Raleigh-Durham station WTVD that her brother, Kevin Neal, suffered from paranoia."It was always something," Orr said. "His mental health had slipped."She added: "He clearly had no business with firearms and refused to get any help. He wouldn't even go to government clinics when we would arrange it because he was afraid of the government getting his numbers. It was full-on paranoia and delusion."Neal was shot and killed by police Tuesday after allegedly initiating multiple shootings that morning that killed four people and injured several more. Authorities later determined that Neal's wife had also been killed -- likely the night before -- which may have sparked the rampage.In the past, the family had received calls from Neal allegedly threatening to hurt himself "all the time," Orr said. He would say worrying phrases such as "I just can't take it anymore," and "I'm just going to run into the woods," Orr said.Orr said she never thought her brother would do anything like what happened this week, however.Neal grew up in Cary, North Carolina, and attended East Carolina University, WTVD reported. He moved to California 12 years ago, but his mother and sister remained in North Carolina.At the time of the shooting, Neal was out on bail for a January arrest, in which he was charged with assault of a deadly weapon, authorities said. His mother had posted his bond and spent $10,000 in lawyer fees from that incident, WTVD reported.Police believe that Neal was looking to kill people during the string of shootings, which included him firing about 30 rounds into an elementary school in Corning, California, about 130 miles north of Sacramento.WTVD spoke with Orr just an hour after a California sheriff notified the family of Neal's death in the driveway to her home, where she apologized to the loved ones of the victims of the shootings."We're so sorry, and we can't imagine what they're dealing with," she said. "... I just don't know what to say other than our hearts break."
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