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  • iStock/Thinktsock(SAN FRANCISCO) -- Video has been released from an October incident at San Francisco International Airport, in which air traffic controllers were unable to reach the pilots of an incoming Air Canada plane for more than 35 seconds."Air Canada 781, go around," an air traffic controller can be heard saying repeatedly in audio.According to the Federal Aviation Administration, which is investigating the incident, Air Canada flight 781 from Montreal, Quebec, failed to respond Oct. 22 to six separate calls from the air traffic control tower to abort its landing."The pilots acknowledged landing clearance when they entered final approach to San Francisco but was later told six times to abort the landing and 'go around,'" the FAA said in October. "It appears the pilots didn't hear the controller."Air traffic controllers even tried using a flashing red light gun to get pilots' attention, which the FAA said was "standard protocol when an air crew is not responding to radio instructions."According to ABC station KGO-TV, which obtained the footage, authorities were particularly worried because an aircraft was already on the ground.As controllers tried to reach the Air Canada pilots, KGO said, a United flight that had landed previously was being asked to move quickly so it would avoid a different United flight that was landing on an adjacent runway."United 2065, without delay. Cross 28 left," an air traffic controller says. "Contact ground point 8 without delay, please. Traffic coming 2 mile final and they're fast."The Air Canada flight, an Airbus A320-200, landed safely at 9:26 p.m. local time with pilots finally contacting the tower."Yeah, Air Canada 781. ... There's a problem with the radio here," the pilot can be heard saying."That's, uh, pretty evident," an air traffic controller says.In a statement on Friday, Transport Canada told ABC News: "Following the incident at San Francisco International Airport on October 22, Transport Canada is in contact with Air Canada to establish facts and verify compliance with safety regulations."
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  • Evan Simon/ABC News(BOSSIER CITY, La.) -- Sterling Crutcher grew up idolizing his grandfather, and he said his desire to join the military was shaped in part by years of hearing his stories.“He was always a big proponent of the military," Crutcher told ABC News.Crutcher's grandfather recounted stories of the missions he had been on and his life in the armed forces."We heard them all," Crutcher remembers.In 2015, Crutcher ended up following in his grandfather's footsteps and joined the Air Force. He currently serves as an airman first class and munitions technician based at Barksdale Air Force Base in Bossier City, La. But now, his desire to serve in the military for his entire career may be cut short for one reason: Crutcher is openly transgender.On July 26, President Donald Trump announced a ban on transgender individuals serving in any capacity in the U.S. military on Twitter. On Aug. 25, the White House issued a presidential memorandum giving Defense Secretary James Mattis until Feb. 21, 2018, to come up with a plan “to return to the longstanding policy and practice on military service” that banned openly transgender service members from serving.In the meantime, Crutcher and others are living in a sort of limbo. He reacted to Trump's tweets in July by posting a message on Facebook that went viral."I put on this uniform every day not for praise or adoration. Not for some free healthcare. I do it because it was ingrained in me as a child by my grandfather. He spoke so highly and proudly of his years of service in the army. I joined because there is a sense of pride you get from serving your country and fighting for your neighbors," Crutcher wrote in the post, which has received more than 115,000 likes.But Crutcher said he received mixed reactions to his decision to speak out."It was hard to see and read [the negative responses] but you know, I decided it doesn't matter. The people that I'm working for, if they see that I'm doing a good job, then that's what matters. Because as long as I'm doing my job and I'm sticking to my oath, I will always put the mission first," Crutcher said."I've done that in the past and I'll continue to do that and I think that's what matters," he added.The negative Facebook comments about his service weren't the first time he has received backlash after coming out as a trans man. He said his wife, Aimee, has always been supportive, but that wasn't the case with the rest of his immediate family.Instead, he said his fellow airmen have become more than just his friends. They’ve become his family.“They still dead-name me,” Crutcher said, referring to the fact that some of his family still refers to him by the female name he was given at birth. “They still poignantly point out female pronouns, stuff like that.”Instead, he said his friends on the base in Shreveport have become an alternative family.“There’s a couple in the Air Force that I consider my Air Force mom and dad because they really stepped up, they took me in when I was down. They took me in when I was hurting,” he said.But Trump's proposed ban on openly transgender service members has put his and Aimee's dreams of starting their own family on hold. The couple said they had been planning to start having kids in the near future but are now focusing on saving money in case he is barred from serving in the military. They worry that if the ban is enacted, they will be forced to move off the Air Force base and start anew somewhere else.“I didn't want to believe that a tweet had that much weight on our life,” Aimee Crutcher said. “I told my husband, ‘Don't worry, it's just a tweet.’ I think we both knew deep down it was going to become more than that.”See more of Sterling Crutcher’s story when “Under Review,” a new short documentary from ABC News Features, releases on Nov. 16.
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  • Larry Mayer, Billings Gazette(BILLINGS, Mont.) -- If you got pulled over in Billings, Montana this week, you may have gotten a turkey instead of a ticket.Officers Brandon Ihde, Andrew Sanders and Eric Schnelbach of the Billings Police Department's traffic enforcement team pulled over drivers Wednesday and let them go with a warning, along with a frozen bird.Lieutenant Neil Lawrence told ABC News that this was the first year that the department made the Thanksgiving gesture."The individuals that received the warnings and the turkeys have been very happy," Lawrence said. "Our Facebook page has received a lot of positive comments regarding it. So far its been a very positive thing for the community."Only drivers who committed minor traffic violations were let off the hook with a Thanksgiving turkey."The turkeys were handed to, let's say, someone going over the speed limit a few miles an hour or rolling through a stop sign," Lawrence explained.Lawrence said a local businessman, who is remaining anonymous, donated 20 turkeys for police to hand out for families in Billings.
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  • Texas Department of Public Safety(SUTHERLAND SPRINGS, Texas) -- Texas church shooting suspect and Air Force veteran Devin Kelley escaped from a New Mexico “behavioral center” in 2012, according to an El Paso Police Department report, which also said he "was attempting to carry out death threats" that he "had made on his military chain of command."A witness said Kelley "suffered from mental disorders and had plans to run from Peak Behavioral Health Services ... and take a bus out of state,” according to the report.The report said Kelley had previously been caught sneaking firearms onto Hollaman Air Force Base where he served in New Mexico. The report also noted that Kelley was facing military criminal charges.Kelley was located and did not resist or make any comments about harming himself or other officers, the report said. He was released to Sunland Park police officers, the report said.-- Kelley is accused of carrying out a mass shooting at the First Baptist Church in Sutherland Springs, about 40 miles southeast of San Antonio, on Sunday, killing 26 -- including an unborn child. Twenty others were injured, 10 of the critically, authorities said.-- There appears to have been "roughly just over 50" people at the church service, with "very few" of them uninjured, officials said.-- It appears the rifle used in the attack was a semiautomatic weapon and there's no evidence a bump stock was used, authorities said Tuesday.-- Kelley, 26, died after the attack.Suspect's phone too encrypted to accessInvestigators have been unable to access information on the phone belonging to because it is encrypted, officials said Tuesday.But Christopher Comb of the FBI said Tuesday authorities will press forward "until we find an answer.""We're working very hard to get into the phone and that will continue until we find an answer," Combs said. "I don't know how long that's going to be to be, quite honest with you. It could be tomorrow, a week or a month. We don't know yet. We're going to keep working on the phone and the other digital media we have."The device "highlights an issue that you have all heard about before with the advance of the technology and the phones and the encryptions -- law enforcement, whether it's at the state, local or federal level, is increasingly not able to get into these phones,” Combs said.He added, "I'm not going to describe what phone it is because I don't want to tell every bad guy out there what phone to buy."Shooter was 'at odds with his in-laws'While authorities have not released a specific motive, they said the shooter was "at odds with his in-laws."The suspect's mother-in-law has attended the church but was not there at the time of the shooting, authorities said. He had "expressed anger towards" her and sent "threatening texts," officials said.The suspect was not in any FBI database, authorities said.There's no reason to believe anyone else besides Kelley was involved in the attack, authorities said.Suspect 'was there to kill everybody'Authorities have reviewed video from inside church.Kelley "was there to kill everybody," a source familiar with the matter told ABC News. "He is a mass killer of children and people."Suspect's Air Force historyKelley served in the Air Force from 2010 until 2014 and he left after receiving a bad conduct discharge, which is the second-lowest level of dismissal in the armed services.He was court-martialed in 2012 on charges of assault and aggravated assault on his spouse and a child, according to the Air Force.According to documents from the Air Force, Kelley pleaded guilty to hitting his then-wife with his hands and choking her, as well as striking and hitting his stepson "with a force likely to produce death or grievous bodily harm."He was found guilty by a mixed jury of officers and enlisted personnel and began his military confinement at the Naval Consolidated Brig, Miramar in California, outside San Diego, starting on Nov. 7, 2012. He was discharged from bot
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  • Google Maps(CONYERS, Ga.) -- A public school teacher in Georgia has been placed on administrative leave after allegedly threatening a student late last month, officials said.A video taken from the classroom of the Rockdale Career Academy in Conyers shows the teacher telling a student not to "screw" with him, or he will "get in big-a-- trouble." It is not clear if the student he was allegedly speaking to can be seen in the video."Don't smile at me, man, OK? That's how people like you get shot," the teacher, who is white, told the student, who is black. "I got a bet. I bet by the time you're 21, somebody's gonna put a bullet right through your head. And it might be me -- the one that does it."Students in the classroom are heard expressing shock at the teacher's statements.The mother of the student that the teacher was allegedly speaking to posted the video to Facebook on Friday, saying that she was "outraged" that the incident occurred."You see these stories on the news never believing it will happen to your child," April Carr wrote on Facebook. "Well it happened to mine and we will get justice."Carr told ABC Atlanta affiliate WSB-TV that the physics teacher made the comments after her son and other students laughed as he wrote an equation on the board.The teacher then walked over to Carr's son and began his rant, Carr told ABC News, adding that there was "no back and forth" or "disrespectful" banter between her son and his teacher.Carr said the teacher's comments were "outright racist.""He's in a classroom of a majority African-American students, so for you to say 'you people,' it's an outright racist statement -- no covering it up," Carr said.Carr said her son recently turned 17 and that she's had "plenty of conversations with him about how to conduct himself and how to act when he's out," which includes being "respectful at all times." He is in the gifted program, takes multiple AP classes and is on the wrestling and football team for the school, Carr said.Carr said that with "all the shootings" going on in the country, she "can't afford" to take the teacher's comments lightly."I have to take it as seriously as it sounded," she said.Carr said that she believes the teacher should be fired."This is not OK, you know, for our educators and the people who parents send our kids to school to learn from," Carr said.An incident report from the Rockdale County Sheriff's office identified the teacher as Paul Hagen. The incident was reported to authorities by Carr on Friday after she received a phone call from the school the previous day informing her of the incident. Carr learned of the video after speaking to her son, according to the incident report.The alleged incident happened more than a week before it was reported to the sheriff's office, the report states.There is a Paul Hagan listed as the school's science department chair and electronics instructor at the school, according to the directory on the school website. He was placed on administrative leave as the matter is under investigation, Rockdale County Public Schools said in a statement.ABC News could not immediately reach Hagan for comment.
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