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  • Providence Police Department (PROVIDENCE, R.I.) -- Rhode Island authorities on Friday released police body camera and traffic surveillance footage as they defended the actions of officers who, a day earlier, had shot and killed a pickup truck driver and wounded his passenger after a high speed chase.The incident began Thursday morning when a state trooper was transporting a handcuffed prisoner to court. The trooper stopped to investigate a car crash on Route 146 in Providence at approximately 9 a.m. ET. When the trooper got out of his marked cruiser, the prisoner took control of the vehicle and drove off without him, according to Rhode Island State Police.The stolen cruiser was found about 30 minutes later abandoned on a street in the capital city. State and local authorities launched an intensive manhunt for the escaped prisoner, identified as 35-year-old Donald Morgan.In the search for Morgan, authorities received a tip that the man was seen trying to get into a white pickup truck in the area, prompting investigating officers to pull over white pickup trucks in the city, according to Providence Police Chief Hugh T. Clements Jr.At about 10:35 a.m., a white pickup truck sped off as a Cranston police officer attempted to pull over the vehicle, leading authorities on an intense pursuit.The Providence Police Department released video from Rhode Island's Department of Transportation, which shows a large white pickup truck speeding up a highway, weaving through traffic and driving in a shoulder lane as police follow closely behind.The truck darts up a ramp onto Route 95, but a police officer had stopped his vehicle ahead to block traffic and prevent the truck from escaping. Numerous police cruisers pull up behind the truck and officers with guns drawn converge on the vehicle. But the truck tries to drive forward anyway, hitting a small car stopped on the ramp and ramming it aside. An officer helped the female driver out of that car, according to the Providence police chief.Officers jump out of the way as the truck smashes back and forth into vehicles, the driver apparently trying to force a way out.The Providence Police Department also released footage from an officer wearing a body camera who arrives on scene as authorities begin firing shots at the truck, which has tinted windows. Thick plumes of white smoke billow into the air from the truck's spinning tires. More than 40 shots were fired by multiple officers and troopers in two separate volleys of gunfire, the police chief said."We believe that video shows the acts of the officers as doing exactly what we would want them to do in stopping an imminent and significant threat," Clements said Friday at a press conference to release the footage.The video shows authorities swarming over the truck when it becomes clear it's no longer moving. One officer shouts, "Watch the passenger! Watch the passenger!"The driver of the truck, identified as Joseph Santos, 32, was shot and killed. He was shot multiple times, according to the Providence police chief.A female passenger in the truck, identified as Christine Demers, was hospitalized for injuries, the police chief said.The man who stole the marked cruiser, whom authorities were initially searching for, was arrested Friday night at a residence in Cumberland, according to Rhode Island State Police. Morgan was charged with escape from custody, possession of a stolen motor vehicle, obstructing an officer in execution of duty, larceny of a motor vehicle, reckless driving and resisting arrest.Two other people, identified as Daniel Medeiros, 54, and Rachael Read, 47, both of Cumberland, were also arrested and charged with harboring a criminal, state police said.The Providence Police Department and Rhode Island State Police have launched a joint investigation overseen by the attorney general into Thursday's officer-involved shooting, according to Providence Public Safety Commissioner Steven Pare. The case will be presented to a grand jury, which w
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  • Britt Harris(NEW YORK) -- In honor of Veterans Day, ABC News is recalling some of the most heartwarming military stories we’ve covered in 2017.Both active-duty service members and veterans made headlines for touching homecomings, surprise marriage proposals or other emotional and uplifting moments.Here are some of those stories as the U.S. marks its 98th Veterans Day.Alison Ferrell’s “something blue” at her May 13 wedding in Cape Girardeau, Missouri, was her 92-year-old uncle, Bill Lee Eblen, who wore his Marine dress blues.“From the moment I got engaged I knew I wanted to include my uncle Bill in a special way,” Ferrell, 30, told ABC News. “I come from a family where we were taught to have the utmost respect and admiration for the armed services and honoring him as the ‘something blue’ just seemed like the natural choice.”Britt Harris’ husband, Chris Harris, died while deployed with the U.S. Army in Afghanistan just one week after his wife told him she was expecting their first child. In order to keep Chris Harris’s fellow soldiers close to their child, she decided to let them be the first to reveal the gender.The soldiers filmed themselves opening the poppers in Afghanistan in front of an American flag.Nakita Brown and Rymario Armstrong, a Marine veteran, had been engaged for three years before they finally tied the knot in a beautiful wedding ceremony in Beaufort, South Carolina, on July 4. The catch? The entire thing was a complete surprise for her groom.“I was actually calm. I thought I’d be nervous and crying, but I was ready for it to happen and to marry him,” Brown, 30, told ABC News of the long-delayed nuptials.Kristi Flury, 12, thought she was on a mom-daughter date at Chicago’s Brookfield Zoo when she and her mom sat down to watch the zoo’s dolphin show.When Kristi, of Sycamore, Illinois, was chosen to participate in the show, it became a dream fulfilled. Kristi’s dad, Josh Flury, a captain in the U.S. Army Reserves, surprised her after a nine-month deployment to Kuwait.This military father had a very magical tea party with his 4-year-old daughter, Ashley, and the special moment was captured on camera.“My husband had no idea what was going to happen until we showed up to the shoot,” Lizette Porter told ABC News of her husband Keven Porter, a U.S. Marine Corps drill instructor. “He was hesitant at first but after a little talking I was able to convince him. He would do anything for Ashley.”Navy seaman Chris Daugherty came home from deployment on June 23 to hugs from his children, but he got a bigger surprise when he saw his wife, Natasha. She had a baby bump.Natasha Daugherty, of Temecula, California, had hidden her pregnancy from her husband for six months while he was aboard the USS Carl Vinson.“I found out about a week after he left. I didn’t believe it,” Natasha, 28 told ABC News.Marine Jon Trommer, adorned in his dress blues, surprised his girlfriend, Mandy Wehe, on the snow-covered doorstep of her parents’ home in Parma, Ohio, to pop the question.She had no idea he was home from being stationed at Marine Corps Air Station Miramar in California, let alone with a diamond ring.“It went really smoothly,” a relieved Trommer told ABC News. “It was so hard to keep the secret from her.”
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- A military jury has sentenced a Marine Corps drill instructor to 10 years behind bars for tormenting and physically abusing young recruits, especially Muslims, including one who later killed himself.Gunnery Sgt. Joseph Felix on Thursday was found guilty of hazing and maltreatment of over a dozen recruits at the Marine Corps boot camp at Parris Island, South Carolina. The 34-year-old Iraq War veteran was convicted of dozens of criminal counts as the eight-member jury determined he kicked, punched and choked trainees including targeting three Muslim-Americans whom he allegedly taunted as "terrorist" and "ISIS." He also pressured at least of the Muslim recruits to get into an industrial clothes dryer.The jury at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina, on Friday sentenced Felix to military prison, reduced his rank to private and also ordered that he forfeit all pay and receive a dishonorable discharge."He wasn't making Marines. He was breaking Marines," prosecutor Lt. Col. John Norman told jurors Wednesday, adding that Felix was a "bully" who particularly "picked out three Muslim recruits for special abuse because of their Muslim faith."A hazing investigation at the Parris Island boot camp led to charges against Felix after the March 2016 suicide of one of the Muslim-American military hopefuls Felix was accused of maltreating.Raheel Siddiqui, a 20-year-old from Taylor, Michigan, jumped to his death on March 18, 2016, after having been “forcefully slapped” in the face between “one and three times” by his drill instructor, according to a report obtained by ABC News from Marine Corps officials in September 2016.He then "stood, ran through the back hatch (exit) of the squad bay, and vaulted the railing of the stairwell, causing him to fall from the third deck of the barracks to the access stairs below," the report said.At the time Siddiqui had been complaining that his throat hurt and he “would not speak or answer when prompted.” He had fallen to the floor grabbing his neck “in apparent pain and failing to comply with orders to respond.” The report said Siddiqui's drill sergeant insisted on an “an acceptable response” that precipitated his slapping the trainee.The 2016 report also found that Siddiqui’s drill instructor was alleged “to have engaged in serious misconduct with a previous platoon, including hazing and verbal and physical abuse of a Muslim recruit.” Substantiation of those allegations should have led to his suspension as a drill instructor, according to the report.Five days prior to his death, Siddiqui was found to have made a suicidal threat that led to his being placed on watch and scheduled for a mental health evaluation the next day. He recanted his threat but his unit’s leadership “failed to report an allegation he made of physical abuse by his drill instructors,” the report said. The next day he was cleared for duty.A Marine Corps statement in September 2016 said, "Findings from the Siddiqui investigation conclude that Siddiqui's death was the result of suicide."In another case, Felix was accused of ordering former recruit Lance Cpl. Ameer Bourmeche into an industrial-size clothes dryer and turning it on as he demanded Bourmeche renounce his Muslim faith. Bourmeche, now a 23-year-old lance corporal at Camp Pendleton in California, testified during the trial that he twice affirmed his faith and twice Felix and another drill instructor order him to climb inside the dryer.Bourmeche alleged they turned on the dryer with him inside three separate times while asking whether he renounced Islam. Fearing for his life after a third bruising spin, Bourmeche said, he told them he was no longer Muslim. He was then allowed to get out of the dryer, he said.
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  • ABC News(NEW YORK) -- The coldest air of the season has moved in and it feels more like mid-January than November from the Midwest to the Northeast.This Arctic blast has also triggered lake-effect snow showers and the first snow of the season for Chicago this morning. Heavy lake-effect snow bands caused accidents and spin-outs across parts of Northern Michigan overnight.On Friday morning, record lows were tied or broken from Minnesota to Michigan:
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  • @Salcedoseth/Instagram(NEW YORK) -- New York City's subway rats can't get enough of the delicious fast food riders discard during their daily commutes.More than two years after Pizza Rat caused an internet sensation after it was seen carrying a slice more than twice its size, two rats were seen at the 14th Street L station battling it out for a single French fry.Instagram user Seth Salcedo spotted the rats as he was waiting for the train Thursday, he told ABC News. The rats engage in a tug-of-war scuffle over the coveted fry before one of them pulls it away and runs off.The other rat doesn't let the victor get away too easy and chases it -- in hopes of regaining the prize -- before the pair disappear under the subway tracks.
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