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  • Amy Lieberfarb/Instagram (SANTA ANA, Calif.) -- An unfortunate combination of wind and aridity in California created perfect wildfire growth conditions this morning, leading to the current devastation across the state.At least 10 people have died from the blazes, with hundreds of structures scorched and thousands forced to evacuate. The fires began around 10 p.m. local time Sunday night, said Ken Pimlott, director of the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (Cal Fire).By Monday afternoon, nearly 90,000 acres burned and the flames threatened the large city of Anaheim.Here’s how the weather conditions fueled a fast-moving fire and destruction from north to south.California wildfires and weatherIn northern California, strong, northeasterly gusts paired with low humidity in the morning. The gusts facilitated a quick spread of the fire.In southern California, a Santa Ana wind event fueled the fires. October is peak time for Santa Ana winds, which create high pressure over the Great Basin and low pressure off the coast, allowing for very strong offshore winds. October is traditionally the worst time to fight fires in California, Pimlott said this the morning.On Monday, gusts reached up to 70 miles per hour in some high elevation areas in southern California.This, paired with the dry conditions brought about by low humidity, created critical fire danger.California Gov. Jerry Brown stressed the danger of these simultaneous conditions in a press conference this morning.“This is really serious. It’s moving fast. The heat, the lack of humidity and the winds are all driving a very dangerous situation and making it worse,” Brown said.There is good news, however -- because though the winds flared this morning, they’re now likely to weaken. The worst of the winds passed earlier Monday in both northern and southern California.
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  • ABC News(LAS VEGAS) -- It has been a week since Stephen Paddock, a 64-year-old retired accountant and high-stakes video poker player, unloaded on 22,000 country music fans from his 32nd-floor suite in Las Vegas’ Mandalay Bay Resort moored on the city’s Sunset Strip, killing 58 people and wounding hundreds before fatally shooting himself in the head.Here are some of the latest details:
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  • KGO-TV(SANTA ROSA, Calif.) -- Wildfires are tearing through northern California, leaving behind a trail of devastation."Everything burned," John Millier, a resident of Santa Rosa, told ABC station KGO-TV in San Francisco.One of Millier's properties was destroyed overnight by the flames, but firefighters were able to save his second property from the raging inferno.While police are calling for residents to evacuate as the fires continue to burn, Millier told KGO-TV he is reluctant to leave.Millier's neighbor John Graves also lost his home."It's Mother Nature at her worst, I guess," Graves told KGO-TV."Been here 25 years," Graves added, surveying his ruined home. "It was a great neighborhood. It's going to be a lot of work getting it back."But Graves is staying positive despite the loss, telling KGO-TV he is thankful that his family is safe."We will put it all back together. It's only stuff," said Graves. "I'm not going to look at this as the end of the world."The wildfires have caused an estimated 20,000 people to evacuate. Two people have died and at least 1,500 structures have been destroyed so far.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(HOLLYWOOD, Fla.) -- Weeks after Miguel Antonio Franco died when his Florida nursing home lost air conditioning from Hurricane Irma, his wife, Cecilia Franco, became the 13th person to die from the incident, police confirmed to ABC News on Monday.Another patient was confirmed to have died, authorities said today, bringing the total to 14.On Sept. 13, more than 100 residents were evacuated from the Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hills after the facility's air conditioning system failed, subjecting the elderly residents to sweltering heat. The nursing home is affiliated with the Larkin Community Hospital.Medical staff from Memorial Regional Hospital, which is near the nursing home, described a chaotic scene of evacuating the patients from the nursing home after three came into the emergency room with "extraordinarily high temperatures."Some of the patients who were admitted to the hospital had temperatures of up to 106 degrees, hospital officials told ABC News. Once hospital staff realized something was amiss at the nursing home, they went into a mass casualty incident mode and began wheeling patients from the nursing home to the hospital on stretchers.The facility -- which has been shut down -- is now the subject of a criminal investigation. The patients' causes of death have not been released because of an ongoing criminal investigation, ABC affiliate WPLG-TV reported.The Francos' children last month filed a wrongful death suit against the facility, the family's lawyer, Albert Levin, confirmed to ABC News.Levin said in a statement to ABC News, "The Franco and Navarro families are now mourning the passing of their mother and grandmother Cecilia Franco, this on the heels of losing her husband of 62 years, their father and grandfather Miguel Franco, both of whom perished in a horrific avoidable tragedy which should never have occurred. Their pain cuts deeply having lost not one but two loved ones."The lawsuit alleges the facility didn't secure "reliable and effective air-conditioning systems to operate in the event of an inevitable and foreseeable power outage," leaving the patients to suffer "in extreme heat and deplorable conditions," WPLG-TV reported.Nursing home administrator Jorge Carballo said in an earlier statement that "the center and its medical and administrative staff diligently prepared" for the hurricane."We took part in emergency management preparedness calls with local and state emergency officials, other nursing homes and health regulators," he said. "While our center did not lose power during the storm, it did lose one transformer that powers the air conditioning unit. The center immediately contacted Florida Power & Light and continued to follow up with them for status updates on when repairs would be made. Outreach was also made to local emergency officials and first responders.”
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  • Obtained by ABC News(LAS VEGAS) -- A note containing handwritten numbers for wind, trajectory, and distance was discovered by Steven Paddock's body inside the Las Vegas hotel room where he took his life last Sunday after slaughtering 58 people and injuring hundreds, officials have confirmed.Law enforcement officials briefed on the investigation confirmed to ABC News on Sunday that the note found on Paddock's hexagon-shaped nightstand contained such numerical figures.The note's details, first reported by "60 Minutes," were revealed by Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department Officer Dave Newton, who said he spotted it resting by Paddock's "shooting platform.""I could see on it he had written the distance, the elevation he was on, the drop of what his bullet was going to be for the crowd," Newton said in a clip from the the episode, which will be televised on Sunday night. "So he had had that written down, and figured out so he would know where to shoot to hit his targets from there."Pressed about what the meaning of the numbers were, Newton said, Paddock "must have done the calculations online or something, to figure out what his altitude was going to be, and how high up he was -- how far out the crowd was going to be, and what -- at that distance -- and what the drop of his bullet was going to be."He hadn't written out the calculations -- all he had was written out [was] the final numbers that were on the sheet," he added.The note's contents give a clearer picture of Paddock's planning before he starting firing on 22,000 concertgoers attending the third day of the Route 91 Harvest Festival along the Las Vegas Strip last Sunday.Sources have told ABC News that Paddock, a 64-year-old retiree, likely had severe mental illness which appears so far to have remained undiagnosed.Authorities who have logged hundreds of interviews suggest that though Paddock was a successful businessman, he struggled interacting with people.The property owner and high-stakes video poker player is described as standoff-ish, disconnected, and a man who had difficulty establishing and maintaining meaningful relationships.He reportedly was exhibiting many antisocial traits that are typical of past mass shooters, according to one source who spoke to ABC News anonymously.In addition to killing 58 people in his attack, Paddock injured at least 489 others before taking his own life.Paddock was known for playing gambling games in casinos for hours at a time, with little or no human contact.Profilers and behavioral scientists this week were brought in to examine witness interviews and investigative summaries to better understand what drove the Mesquite, Nevada, man to execute and injure so many in such a calculated and detached fashion.They are particularly focused on the period of September to October 2016, when Paddock began buying 30-plus guns, in concentration -- most of which were rifles, ABC News has learned.Sources also said that the gunman's gambling wages went up during that time, and he completed computer searches where he was looking at a lot of different hotel venues -- some apparently just to research, some of which he actually traveled to.Police, according to multiple law enforcement officials, still have found no definitive evidence to prove Paddock had an accomplice, and have not nailed down a definitive motive.
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