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  • iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- The FBI is investigating the injuries that left one Border Patrol agent dead and another severely injured as a "potential assault," officials said.The agents had been discovered at the bottom of a ravine in Texas after they had responded to a sensor triggered in the area, law enforcement sources told ABC News.On Monday, authorities were open to the possibility that the two agents had inadvertently slipped into the ravine because of a lack of concrete evidence, the sources said.During a press conference on Tuesday, the FBI Special Agent-in-Charge Emerson Buie, Jr. said it was investigating the case as a "potential assault on federal officers" and appealed to the public to call in with any tips.The unnamed injured agent was released Wednesday afternoon from University Medical Center in El Paso, according to a hospital spokesperson.The reward for information has been raised to $25,000, officials said.President Donald Trump said Monday that the agents had been "brutally attacked." When asked if Trump was correct in the description, Buie said that he had not briefed the president on the case.Texas Gov. Greg Abbott also referred to the injuries the agents sustained as an "attack." Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- A federal grand jury returned a 22-count indictment Tuesday against Sayfullo Saipov in connection with the deadly terror attack on Manhattan's West Side on Halloween.The indictment treats the Islamic State, in whose name Saipov told police he carried out the attack, like a mafia family. It charges Saipov with murder in aid of racketeering, a charge federal prosecutors typically use in organized crime cases."Consumed by hate and a twisted ideology, Sayfullo Saipov allegedly barreled down a pedestrian walkway and bicycle path on a sunny afternoon on the west side of Manhattan, killing eight innocent people," acting U.S. Attorney Joon Kim said.Saipov, a 29-year-old Uzbek native who had been living in New Jersey, has been in federal custody since the attack that killed eight people, including five Argentine men visiting New York to celebrate a high school reunion.Saipov had previously been charged in a criminal complaint that accused him of two crimes, one of which made him eligible for the death penalty.According to the indictment, Saipov allegedly told authorities he was inspired to carry out the attack by ISIS videos he had watched on his phone.The indictment states "he decided to use a truck to inflict maximum damage against civilians," federal prosecutors said. He rented the truck a little more than a week prior to the attack on Oct. 31 to practice driving it.Saipov allegedly planned to use the truck to strike pedestrians in the vicinity of the West Side Highway and then proceed to the Brooklyn Bridge to continue to strike pedestrians, the indictment states.Instead, the attack stopped when Saipov hit a school bus, exited the truck waving two toy guns and was shot by police.Saipov wanted to display ISIS flags in the front and back of the truck during the attack, but decided against it because he did not want to draw attention to himself, the indictment states.He requested to display ISIS’s flag in his hospital room and stated that he felt good about what he had done, police said.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- A jury has awarded a transgender professor $1.1 million after she accused her employer of discrimination.Dr. Rachel Tudor, a professor at Southeastern Oklahoma State University from 2004 to 2011, accused the school in 2010 of subjecting her to sex discrimination "when it denied her application for promotion and tenure during the 2009-10 academic year," according to a lawsuit filed by the U.S. Department of Justice in 2015. Tudor later joined the lawsuit.A jury decided in her favor on Monday, finding a preponderance of evidence that she was “denied tenure because of her gender” and was later retaliated against after complaining about workplace discrimination, according to a verdict form obtained by ABC News.Tudor first filed a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education's Office for Civil Rights, which referred her to U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, the lawsuit states.In that complaint, Tudor states that she notified the school of her intent to transition from male to female in 2007, according to the lawsuit. However, Tudor then received a call from a Southeastern employee who informed her that "Southeastern’s Vice President for Academic Affairs, Dr. Douglas McMillan, had inquired whether Dr. Tudor could be fired because her 'transgender lifestyle' offended his religious beliefs," the lawsuit states. The employee told Tudor that McMillan was told he could not fire Tudor because of her gender identity.Tudor began presenting herself as a woman during the 2007-08 academic year and was informed by Jane McMillan, the director of Southeastern’s Counseling Center and sister of Douglas McMillan, "that she should take safety precautions because some people were openly hostile towards transgender people," according to the lawsuit.Reached by phone Tuesday, Douglas McMillan, who is retired, refused to discuss Tudor's case and court victory. "I don’t want to comment on this, thank you," he said.Jane McMillan did not immediately respond to ABC News' requests for comment.Tudor met with the dean of the School of Arts and Sciences, Dr. Lucretia Scoufos, to begin preparations to apply for tenure in 2009, the lawsuit states. It was during that meeting that Scoufos learned that Tudor was transgender, but Tudor says she nonetheless "intentionally referred to Dr. Tudor by male pronouns such as 'he' and 'him,'" according to the lawsuit.Multiple attempts by ABC News to get comment from Scoufos, who is also retired according to the university's spokesman, were unsuccessful.After Tudor submitted her application for tenure, the Promotion & Tenure Review Committee recommended she receive a promotion and tenure. However, Tudor's application was ultimately denied without explanation, the lawsuit states. It was the first time an English professor was denied a promotion and tenure despite a recommendation from the committee. In June 2010, Tudor received a letter from Douglas McMillan stating her application had been denied because "her record in the areas of 'research/scholarship' and 'university service' were deficient," the lawsuit states.Tudor then filed her complaint with the Department of Education and attempted to reapply for tenure in 2010, but was denied. She supplemented her complaint to the EEOC in 2011, further accusing the university of retaliating against her for complaining about the school's discrimination. That year, Tudor was fired from her position because she had failed to attain tenure.The case ultimately made its way to the Department of Justice, which filed a lawsuit against the school in March 2015.Tudor has not yet commented on the verdict.In a statement on Tuesday, Southeastern president Sean Burrage said: “Southeastern Oklahoma State University places great trust in the judicial system and respects the verdict rendered today by the jury. It has been our position throughout this process that the legal system would handle this matter, while the U
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- The injuries that left one Border Patrol agent dead and another severely injured in Texas remain a mystery, law enforcement sources told ABC News.Authorities are looking into the possibility that this was an accident, the sources added.The investigation stems from the discovery of two Border Patrol agents found at the bottom of a ravine. They were there near midnight responding to a sensor triggered in the area. Due to the lack of concrete evidence in the case, authorities are staying open to the possibility that the two agents may have accidentally slipped off the ravine, leading to them sustaining such serious injuries, the sources said.Fallen Border Patrol agent remembered by lifelong friend as 'good guy' who wanted to 'make a difference'Authorities emphasized that no determination about the cause of the injuries has been made. The FBI is investigating.Earlier today, President Donald Trump said without caveat that the men had been “brutally attacked.”Texas Gov. Greg Abbott called the incident an “attack” and is offering a $20,000 reward for information leading to the arrest of a suspect in what his office described as a “murder.”As of now, sources have told ABC News that the evidence does not support or refute that claim.
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  • Obtained by ABC News(CHATTANOOGA, Tenn.) -- Drivers and fire officials were caught off guard early Monday when they responded to a tractor-trailer fire and found not one, but three African elephants.The elephants, which were evacuated from the vehicle, were captured standing along Interstate 24 in Georgia, just across the border from Tennessee.The owners were able to get the elephants out of the attached trailer safely and to the side of the road without any problem. None of the animals were injured in the fire.Battalion Chief Lesley Morgan of the Chattanooga Fire Department described the elephants on Facebook as "HUGE, but well behaved" and said they ate hay by the roadside while officials battled the blaze.Morgan told ABC News that the elephants are privately owned by the couple who were hauling them, who adopted the animals after they were orhpaned as babies. They traveled the countries doing educational shows and were heading to Florida for warmer weather when the vehicle caught fire.The tractor-trailer's engine caught fire while the couple were driving, Morgan said. When they noticed the flames, they pulled to the side of the road and evacuated the anaimals, Morgan added.Tracy Beavers, a Puckett EMS paramedic, captured a photo of the animals standing by the road. She told ABC News no flash was used to take the picture due to concern of spooking the elephants.The owners were able to get another tractor to the location of the fire. From there, the elephants boarded into the trailer and continued on to Sarasota, Florida.
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