Archives
  • ABC News(OKLAHOMA CITY) -- Not one, but two men ran to their respective cars to grab their guns when a shooter opened fire at an Oklahoma City restaurant Thursday.Police Capt. Bo Matthews said Friday that both of those men, who have not been publicly identified, shot suspect Alexander C. Tilghman on Thursday. Tilghman died as a result of those gunshots.Before being killed by the two civilians, Tilghman fired shots into Louie's Grill & Bar near Lake Hefner on Thursday. He shot three people, all of whom are expected to survive, Matthews said.Immediately after the shooting, Matthews told the media that a single civilian shot the suspect, but upon further investigation, it was determined that two men both shot the suspect. The two men who shot Tilghman "were not carrying their firearms on them, they [their firearms] were in their vehicles," Matthews said today.When asked what he would call the two men, Matthew described them as "two people that stopped a very tragic situation from going any further."During the news conference today, Matthews wouldn't directly call them "heroes" but said that it was "a great terminology" for the media to use."You can say they're heroes, which is a very good thing to say," Matthews said.The two men did not know one another and had arrived at the restaurant separately, he said.Matthews said that because the men were not carrying their weapons on them, conceal carry laws would not be applicable in the case. He did not disclose any information about whether or not they had such licenses, and said that it would be up to the district attorney to decide if they face any charges for their actions, but hinted that he does not expect a case to be brought against them."These guys were protecting somebody else's life. I would think more than likely they would not be filed on," Matthews said.Tilghman, 28, was reportedly wearing shooting glasses and earmuffs commonly seen at gun ranges, Matthews said."It looks like his mind was made up that he was going to [use] his firearm when he got there," Matthews said.Matthews said the police "have no records of anybody making any other reports" on Tilghman in their system, though he did have a record of a 2003 arrest for domestic assault and battery from when he was 13 years old.Matthews said that police have not found any record of Tilghman having mental health issues, though said that if someone is to commit "an act like this, you'd have to assume that he probably had a little bit of mental illness."Tilghman fired "from the outside of the door into the restaurant," Matthews said, adding "to me, it looks like a random event.""It could have been really tragic. Again, we're really blessed that only three people were shot and didn't lose their lives," Matthews said of the victims.The National Rifle Association tweeted about the shooting on Thursday, touting it as an example of the idea that “the best way to stop a bad guy with a gun is a good guy with a gun,” an idea disputed by experts.The gun rights group also used their tweet to send a message to Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin, who vetoed a bill that would have eliminated the requirement for people to have completed a firearms training course in order to carry guns in public. The NRA supported the proposed bill, but the Republican governor, who has supported concealed carry and open carry laws in the past, vetoed it.“I believe the firearms laws we currently have in place are effective, appropriate and minimal, and serve to reassure our citizens that people who are carrying handguns in this state are qualified to do so,” she said in a statement explaining her veto.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
    Read more...
  • Denise Truscello/Getty Images(LAS VEGAS) -- Among the thousands of documents just released by police about the Las Vegas mass shooting, a statement from one woman said a client named Stephen Paddock told her the Las Vegas Strip was vulnerable -- months before the shooting.A hair stylist, whose name was redacted, detailed an encounter she claimed to have had with Paddock in a statement to the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police. She said his strange comments made her feel uneasy."He was talkin’ about the area down on the Strip," she said in the statement. "I didn’t know anything about it because I don’t go to the Strip like most locals don’t. He said that it was an outdoor arena and that he couldn’t believe that they made it an outdoor arena because anybody could shoot into the crowd from ... the casino across the way."Shortly after finishing the haircut, she said an Asian woman came in who she thought to be Marilou Danley, Paddock's girlfriend.The stylist said she asked the woman she believed was Danley whether she knew what Paddock had been telling her. She said the woman replied, "Oh, what about somebody shooting into a crowd and, you know, wanting to hurt a lot of people?"The stylist claimed that Paddock paid the bill and then said, "I wonder what she’s worried about? She’ll be out of the country."She later claimed that Danley had said she was going to leave the country because of her husband's statements. The stylist said Danley told her, "Oh my husband's talkin' about crazy stuff and wantin' ... to hurt people ... I'm leaving the country. I gotta get out of the country before it happens."Danley was in the Philippines at the time of the shooting and no criminal charges are expected against her, the Las Vegas Metro Police Department has said. She has repeatedly told law enforcement that she was unaware of Paddock’s plans to carry out the shooting.About three days later, the stylist claimed she called and reported the conversation to Las Vegas police, telling them, "This is probably somethin’ that’s just crazy, that I’m probably overreacting on, but it was really strange."The woman claimed she had also spoken to the FBI, who told her they could not find records of Paddock or Danley visiting the salon, after she said they had subpoenaed the records. She said she wasn't sure what number she had called police from and later said she had begun to doubt herself about whether she called.Las Vegas police released the thousands of redacted documents related to the deadliest mass shooting in U.S. history on October 1, 2017, in which 58 people died and hundreds more were injured. The released documents were provided after a court order that followed a public records lawsuit from media organizations seeking more information on the investigation. The documents included a mix of police reports and witness statements.
    Read more...
  • Eduardo MunozAlvarez/VIEWpress/Corbis via Getty Images(MORRISTOWN, N.J.) -- New Jersey prosecutors have charged a school bus driver with two counts of death by auto in connection with the double-fatal crash that killed a student and teacher from Paramus last week, according to the State Superior Court Clerk's Office in Morristown.Hudy Muldrow, 77, was driving the bus that collided with a dump truck in Mount Olive on Thursday, killing 10-year-old fifth-grader Miranda Vargas and teacher Jennifer Williamson, 51.In a news release from the Morris County Prosecutor's Office, authorities said the bus that Muldrow was driving as well as two other school buses had been taking students and teachers from East Brook Middle School on a field trip to Waterloo Village that morning.All three buses "missed a turn" on their journey to Waterloo Village, the release said, and all three attempted to correct their mistake. The two other buses arrived at Waterloo; however, according to the release, Muldrow "is alleged to have turned Bus #2 to the left in an apparent attempt to gain access to the official-use only access point located between the East and Westbound lanes of Route 80.""Hudy Muldrow turned Bus #2 so that it was positioned in an almost-perpendicular direction in relation to the lanes of travel on Route 80 Westbound," which is a three-lane highway. At that point, "Bus #2 was impacted by a dump truck that was traveling in the center lane of Route 80 Westbound."Authorities said that in addition to killing Miranda and Williamson, the crash had caused numerous injuries to others on the bus as well as to the dump truck driver."The full extent of the non-fatal injuries has yet to be determined, but range from minor to multiple serious and potentially life-threatening injuries. ... The investigation into this incident remains active and ongoing, and additional charges may be sought in the future," the release said.On Tuesday, a New Jersey Motor Vehicle Commission spokesperson revealed that since getting his driver's license in 1975, Muldrow had a total of 14 suspensions, eight speeding tickets, a careless driving ticket and a ticket for an improper turn in 2010.Muldrow, who began driving school buses in 2013, currently has a valid driver's license that's not suspended. He also has no active points and has the appropriate commercial license to drive a school bus.Muldrow's son, Hudy Muldrow Jr., told NJ.com on Tuesday that his father was a good driver.When Hudy Muldrow Jr. was asked about his father's driving violations, he said: "I don't know anything about that. I have nothing else to say."Muldrow surrendered to New Jersey State Police and was booked into the Morris County Jail to await arraignment Friday.According to the Paramus School Board, a candlelight vigil is planned Thursday for both Miranda and Williamson.
    Read more...
  • WPVI-TV(PHILADELPHIA) -- Investigators are trying to get to the bottom of puzzling reports from residents in northeastern Pennsylvania, who say they heard loud booms and felt the ground shake in the middle of night.Since April, people living miles apart in areas of neighboring Bucks and Lehigh counties have called police about hearing explosion-like sounds that apparently rattle their homes and shift the ground beneath them, according to ABC station WPVI-TV in Philadelphia.Richland Township Police Chief Richard Ficco said the reports typically come in overnight before dawn."The ground shifting, almost shaking," Ficco told WPVI-TV in a recent interview, describing some of the calls his and other area departments have received in the last several weeks. "The buildings are shaking, ceiling tiles are moving and windows are rattling,""Definitely disconcerting," he added. "I would say unnerving to some people."Ficco said two of his officers have heard the unidentified noise, and one of them also saw a flash of light."There was a flash of light and maybe several seconds before he heard the sound, and then the other officer who was further away heard the sound later than he did," the police chief told WPVI-TV. "They both thought it was coming from different directions."Some witnesses have described the noise as a loud thud, while others said it's more like an underground blast.Milford Township resident Samantha Ritter said she thought she heard a firework go off one night. But when she looked outside, there weren't any in sight, she said."I'm hearing like a firework kind of...sound," Ritter told WPVI-TV recently. "I looked out the window, thinking maybe [it was] neighbors setting off fireworks or something."The Pennsylvania State Police, who are leading the investigation into the reports, did not immediately respond to ABC News' request for comment Thursday.Spokespersons for the FBI and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) said both agencies are assisting state police in the ongoing probe.
    Read more...
  • Justin Sullivan/Getty Images(HOUSTON) -- The hard-charging publicity arm of the National Rifle Association is engaged in an increasingly vicious Twitter battle with Houston Police Chief Art Acevedo, as the firearms organization struggles to contain fallout from yet another mass shooting.The result has been a multi-day social media battle between Houston's top law enforcement official and a prominent and outspoken NRA personality. On Tuesday, the dispute escalated to include threats of legal filings, references to Nazi Germany and suggestions of inappropriate surveillance.After last Friday's mass shooting at Santa He High School in Texas, which left ten people dead 13 wounded, Acevedo posted a desperate and emotional plea on his Facebook page to do something about gun violence.“I know some have strong feelings about gun rights but I want you to know I’ve hit rock bottom and I am not interested in your views as it pertains to this issue," Acevedo wrote. "Please do not post anything about guns [not being] the problem and [that] there’s little we can do."“This isn’t a time for prayers, and study and inaction," he continued. "It’s a time for prayers, action and the asking of God’s forgiveness for our inaction.”He followed up the comments on CBS News' Face the Nation, calling on the public to vote out lawmakers "that are doing nothing" on gun violence.NRATV, a combative video production and social media operation that frequently targets perceived opponents of the gun organization, soon released multiple videos of NRATV hosts and guests criticizing Acevedo over his statements on gun violence and his so-called "sanctuary city" stance.“I call him a political hack, in many respects, because he does the bidding of left-wing city officers that hire him,” NRATV host Grant Stinchfield said in a clip the organization tweeted Monday. One Texas law enforcement officials, Tarrant County Sheriff Bill Waybourn, agreed in the clip, saying most law enforcement officers in Texas are “Second Amendment people.”"Art Acevedo is a police chief who thinks it's completely appropriate to ignore the law of the land when it concerns legal immigration,” NRA spokesperson Dana Leosch said in a separate clip, “but thinks that he has the right to apparently go into every home in Texas and inspect how everybody's storing their #firearms."Acevedo responded in a string of tweets late Monday night."NRATV is against what most major cities...police chiefs have to say about these issues," he wrote."NRATV is losing the moral high ground on what was once their core values, so let’s try to talk about anything and everything under the Sun to deflect from issue at hand," he replied to a tweet from Loesch. "We know we are on the right track when that happens."When a third NRATV clip accused Acevedo of ignoring gang violence in Houston to go after gun owners, the police chief replied, "Blah blah blah," and linked to an article about his department's arrest of hundreds of gang members.Acevedo "was incredibly unhappy that I and others called him out," Loesch said in a clip released on Twitter on Tuesday, accusing Acevedo of espousing a "gun-grabbing ideology."Acevedo responded with screenshots of him turning down Loesch’s interview request, and warned further discussion would take place in a legal setting."We will be watching and will do our talking in a court of law if the need arises," he wrote.Loesch retweeted a tweet from a conservative commentator comparing Acevedo to the Gestapo, and was still tweeting at the police chief into Wednesday afternoon."It’s surreal to see a chief reacting to free speech this way," she wrote, eventually questioning whether she was already under surveillance.
    Read more...