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  • ABC News(WASHINGTON) -- Violence flared on some streets of Washington, D.C., on Friday amid Donald Trump's inauguration — with people smashing car and store windows, clashing with police and even torching a limo, leading to more than 200 arrests.The capital's interim police chief, Peter Newsham, said in a Periscope video posted on Twitter earlier Friday that the problems were caused by one group, "and it's a very, very small percentage of the number of folks that came here to peacefully assemble in our city."Police said they responded using pepper spray and other control devices.At least 217 people have been arrested, according to the Metropolitan Police Department, and they were charged with rioting.Six Metropolitan Police Department officers suffered minor non-life-threatening-injuries, Newsham said at a news conference early this evening. He added that three of the six injured officers suffered head injuries from flying objects.Thousands of protesters fanned out across downtown Washington in the morning, including some who tried to block security checkpoints to the inauguration festivities.Protests also cropped up in other parts of the country today, including San Francisco and outside Trump Tower in New York City.Dramatic video published on social media showed men and women using signs and sticks to shatter glass at a Starbucks and a bank. Police then attempted to chase down the suspected vandals.Police said in a statement that an organized group marched through the northwestern part of the city around 10:30 a.m. and that "members of the group acting in a concerted effort engaged in acts of vandalism and several instances of destruction of property."The statement said that the group damaged vehicles, destroyed the property of multiple businesses and ignited small, isolated fires and that police vehicles were among those damaged.The #DisruptJ20 coalition, named after the date of the inauguration, which promised that its participants would attempt to shut down the inauguration events, tangled with Bikers for Trump, a group clad in leather biker gear that backs the president.Video on social media showed the two groups exchanging words and blows just before the start of inauguration festivities.After the inauguration, protesters started a fire on the street, burning what appeared to be garbage and a plastic newspaper stand.Later in the afternoon, protesters set on fire what appeared to be a stretch limo. Images on social media showed the words "We the people" spray-painted on a door of the vehicle. Smoke from the blaze could be seen streaming into the overcast sky.Several verbal encounters took place between the president's supporters and protesters. One Bikers for Trump member chastised protesters, according to a report by the Associated Press."Get a job," said Rahm, a Bikers for Trump member from Philadelphia. "Stop crying, snowflakes. Trump won."Outside the International Spy Museum, protesters in Russian-style hats ridiculed Trump's praise of Russian President Vladimir Putin, marching with signs calling Trump "Putin's puppet" and "Kremlin employee of the month," the AP reported.At the inauguration ceremony, protesters could be seen being removed from the crowd.Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Missouri, responded to the protests on Twitter, writing, "Nothing is more unAmerican than protesters who are not peaceful. Disgusting."
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  • Orlando Police Department(ORLANDO, Fla.) -- One day after accused killer Markeith Loyd cursed at a judge in a court appearance for allegedly killing his pregnant ex-girlfriend, he came back to court to face the same judge for charges of killing a veteran Orlando, Florida police officer.Loyd was combative from the start in Friday morning's court appearance for his alleged killing of Orlando police Lt. Debra Clayton earlier this month. He interrupted the judge as she tried to read his charges and refused to answer questions.Loyd -- appearing with a bandage over his left eye, his hands cuffed and officers holding each of his arms -- said to Judge Jeanette Dejuras Bigney in the state's Ninth Judicial Circuit Court in Orlando, "My name is Markeith Loyd, who are you? Lady in the black dress, who are you?"Loyd appeared without legal representation. When asked whether he wants a public defender, he again asked for the judge's name.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- When President-elect Donald Trump takes the presidential oath at the Capitol, with Barack and Michelle Obama watching, the world will witness a transfer of power between two presidents.Behind the scenes at the White House, the transfer of power between the two first families is already underway as dozens of White House residence staff execute a highly-orchestrated move that will transform the White House to the Trump family’s liking by Friday evening."There's a moving van that is positioned in one direction to take the belongings of the outgoing president and first family to leave the White House," said Anita McBride, who served as chief of staff to first lady Laura Bush. "And then you have moving vans and trucks that are pulling in from the other side of the driveway on the south side of the White House that will be ready to unload all of the belongings of the new family."The transformation of the Obama White House to the Trump White House is executed under the watchful eye of White House chief usher Angella Reid. The White House residence staff are non-political employees who typically serve under multiple administrations."All of the residence staff, again, no matter what role that they play on a day-to-day basis...everybody has a job to do on that morning," McBride said. "They have very unique roles in the White House."Obamas' GoodbyeThe residence staff begin their moving duties after bidding goodbye to the Obamas, who lived in the White House for eight years. The first family typically says goodbye to the residence staff in an often emotional farewell meeting early in the morning on Inauguration Day."I think for the president and first lady that are leaving, there's mixed emotions," McBride said. "You're gonna miss the people that have been around you, your staff, the residence staff, that have taken great care of you for such a long period of time."Of the residence staff, McBride said, "They have emotions too to say goodbye but then it's the frenetic pace that happens soon as the current president leaves the front door where they get to work and get the house ready for the next occupant."Moving trucks have already been spotted at the Washington, D.C., home the Obamas are renting while their youngest daughter, Sasha, 15, finishes high school. Beginning the afternoon of Jan. 20, the Obama family will live outside the confines of the White House gates for the first time in eight years.After Trump is sworn in, the Obamas, including 18-year-old Malia, will fly to Palm Springs, California, for a vacation."Usually there is kind of a swing around, it’s actually quite a moment, the swing around the Capitol where the new president is having lunch with the Congress," ABC News' Cokie Roberts said of the traditional "farewell helicopter ride" for the outgoing first family.Trump White HouseThe White House residence staff has a particularly quick turnover to accomplish this year as Trump's inaugural parade is expected to be far shorter than the parades of his predecessors.White House transformations of the past have included filling the new first family’s closet with their clothes, making sure their favorite foods are stocked and even making sure their preferred towels are hung. This year it remains to be seen what the transformation will include as Melania Trump plans to remain in New York City through at least June so the couple’s son, Barron, can finish the school year."The question of how many rooms that they would be redoing in the private residence really is unclear or undefined right now," McBride said. "You know that definitely they will do their bedrooms to their liking and bedrooms for children.""When [the Obamas] moved in in 2009, the first two rooms that Mrs. Obama did were for her girls and Laura Bush did the same thing for her girls," she said.It also remains unclear how much time Trump himself plans to stay at the White House, as he may choose instead to spend time
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  • Orlando Police Department(ORLANDO, Fla.) -- Suspected cop killer Markeith Loyd -- who was caught Tuesday after a nine-day manhunt in Orlando, Florida -- cursed at the judge in a profanity-laced first appearance in court Thursday morning.Loyd, who was wanted for allegedly killing Master Sgt. Debra Clayton of the Orlando Police Department this month, was in court Thursday charged with killing his pregnant ex-girlfriend Sade Dixon in December. He told the judge he wants to represent himself in the court proceedings involving Dixon’s alleged murder. Loyd has not yet been charged in connection with Sgt. Clayton’s murder.Loyd appeared Thursday with a bandage over his left eye, with his hands cuffed and with officers holding each of his arms.In the murder suspect's profanity-laced tirade, he said to the judge about Dixon's murder, "Ya'll making up s--- like I just went in there and shot this girl, endangering my family. ... Ya'll portray this s--- to the news people like I just went in there and shot this girl.""Ya'll been making up s--- the whole time," he said.Loyd claimed he was beaten by police when authorities captured him as he tried to flee a home on Tuesday.
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  • ABC News/Jacksonville Sheriff's Office(JACKSONVILLE, Fla.) -- The South Carolina woman accused of kidnapping a newborn baby from a hospital in Jacksonville, Florida, in 1998 allegedly admitted to the crime over a year ago, according to court documents obtained by ABC News. Moreover, the stolen child knew she had been abducted, the documents showed.Gloria Williams, 51, allegedly abducted Alexis Manigo on July 10, 1998, just hours after she was born at a Jacksonville hospital and raised the girl as her own in South Carolina. Williams allegedly posed as a nurse and told the baby's mother that the newborn had a fever and she needed to take her away, according to Jacksonville Sheriff Mike Williams.Williams, who has not yet entered a plea, was arrested at her home in Walterboro, South Carolina, on Jan. 13 and charged in the nearly two-decade-old kidnapping case.According to the affidavit for the woman’s arrest warrant obtained by ABC News, the Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office received two anonymous tips last year from the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children. The first tip, which authorities received on Aug. 8, stated that Manigo told her friend that she was kidnapped as a baby and is listed as a missing person. The tip also provided authorities with Manigo’s current name, according to the affidavit.The second tip, which authorities received three months later, stated that Williams confessed to taking Manigo from a hospital in Jacksonville, saying she had renamed the girl and claims her as her daughter. The tip also stated the two were living in Walterboro, according to the affidavit.Detectives with the Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office said they interviewed two witnesses who confirmed the anonymous tips, according to the affidavit. The first witness provided a sworn statement that approximately a year and a half ago Williams confessed to him that she “stole” a baby from a Jacksonville hospital and that she renamed the baby Alexis Manigo, according to the affidavit.A second witness provided a sworn statement that approximately a year-and-a-half ago Manigo told her that she had been kidnapped from a hospital in Jacksonville when she was a baby. According to the witness, Manigo said Williams told her she was named Kamiyah Mobley at birth, the affidavit said.ABC News chief legal affairs anchor Dan Abrams said it’s unlikely Manigo will be charged in the case if she was in fact aware of her own abduction and chose not to report it to police.“She’s a victim,” Abrams said on ABC’s Good Morning America Thursday. “She was stolen away from a hospital, she was brought up by the only mother that she knew, so you have to sympathize with her plight.”Williams was extradited from South Carolina to Florida on Tuesday, according to the Jacksonville sheriff. She returned to Jacksonville for her first court hearing Wednesday morning, where a judge set no bond on the kidnapping charge but set bail at $503,000 on the interference with custody charge, citing the unique circumstances and the gravity of harm alleged by prosecutors.Williams is next scheduled to appear in court on Feb. 8.On Jan. 10, Jacksonville detectives arrived in Walterboro and determined that a birth certificate and social security card for Manigo were fraudulent. The social security number listed with Manigo’s name was issued to a male in Virginia, who died in 1983, according to the affidavit.DNA testing showed that Manigo, now 18, was not Williams' biological daughter. Oral swabs recently submitted by Manigo were compared to DNA samples that had been collected and preserved from Manigo's birth. The result was a positive match, according to the affidavit.Manigo, who was given the name Kamiyah Mobley at birth, was reunited with her biological mother and father last week. She appears to be a normal 18-year-old in good health, according to the Jacksonville sheriff.However, in an exclusive interview t
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