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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- A bull that led police on a wild goose chase through New York City earlier Tuesday has died just hours after it was captured, according to a New York Police Department source briefed on the incident.The bull was originally spotted roaming the streets of the city's Jamaica, Queens, neighborhood late this morning after escaping from a slaughterhouse, according to ABC's New York station WABC-TV.A local named Jimmy King told WABC-TV he was nearly mauled by the animal."[If] I didn't move to the left like this, he would have got me," King said. "Thank God I'm alive."At one point, the bull began grazing on someone's lawn. But once police officers closed in on it, the bull got spooked and trotted off again, according to video recorded by WABC-TV.Several times during the chase, the bull squeezed through and narrowly avoided cop cars that tried to pin it down.Police officers were eventually able to corral the animal and shoot it with several darts containing tranquilizers, WABC-TV reported.Once the bull was sedated, it was loaded onto a vehicle for transport to a local animal shelter -- but it didn't survive for long.Animal Care Centers of NYC said the bull was dead on arrival when it arrived at the Brooklyn facility, according to WABC-TV.The police source told ABC News that while the NYPD is good at many things, the department has proved deficient in bull wrangling."We're really not good at it," the source said. "They don't train us for that in the academy."
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  • KABC-TV(WHITTIER, Calif.) — A veteran officer was killed and another injured after a parolee opened fire on them after they responded to a traffic incident Sunday in Whittier, California, police officials said.The officers responded to a reported incident — in which a driver, who police said was driving a stolen car, rear-ended multiple other vehicles — around 8 a.m.Lt. John Corina of the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Office said the suspect, who was not named, moved his car around the corner after the collisions.When officers arrived on the scene, the other drivers, who had refused to give the suspect a ride, indicated that he had moved his car.The officers, who did not know at the time that the car was stolen, made contact the suspect and went to pat him down, and he pulled out a gun and opened fire, police said."When they got the call, it was just a traffic accident, and they didn't know what they had," Corina told reporters. "When they went to contact him, that's when the shooting happened."Corina said the suspect was 26, a "known gang member" and was armed with a semiautomatic handgun. He was released from jail a week ago.The officers returned fire, wounding him.The suspect was released on parole two weeks ago and has made statements to police.The two officers and the suspect were hospitalized after the shooting, and one officer, Keith Wayne Boyer, died at the hospital. The surviving officer, Patrick Hazel, and the suspect are in stable condition, according to Corina.Boyer became an officer with the Whittier Police Department in 1990 and was remembered as positive and energetic, according to the department's chief, Jeff Piper.He was from the area and had grown children, Piper said.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • ABC News(NEW YORK) -- Following years of drought, parts of Northern California have experienced a deluge of rain so far in 2017.Rain, heavy at times, is expected throughout Monday in the region, before tapering to scattered showers overnight, according to ABC News meteorologists.Around the area of the Oroville Dam, where residents were forced to evacuate last week following concerns that the structure could falter, 1 to 2 inches of rain were expected, and the area surrounding nearby mountains could get as much as 5 inches or more, meteorologists said.Following the rain, wind gusts Monday evening and overnight could create downed trees, power lines, and power outages in some areas.This has been the wettest start to the year ever recorded in the Sacramento area -- which has now exceeded a foot above normal for rainfall since Oct. 1, 2016, according to ABC News' analysis.Some residents of the region are preparing for the possibility of another evacuation of the region surrounding Oroville, according to the Sacramento Bee, but the water has nevertheless been lowered to a safe level.
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  • Indiana State Police(DELPHI, Ind.) -- A tip line set up by investigators in the murder of two Indiana teens who disappeared while hiking is filling up with calls from across the country after a man photographed on a nature trail was named a primary suspect in the killings, police said."Everyone is calling us from everywhere," a spokesperson for the Delphi Police told ABC News.The bodies of the two girls -- Liberty Rose Lynn German, 14, and Abigail Jay Williams, 13, both of Carroll County -- were found last Tuesday near a creek, roughly three-quarters of a mile from an abandoned railroad bridge, near Delphi, Indiana, where they were dropped off Monday to go hiking.Indiana State Police named a man in a photograph as the primary suspect in the double homicide investigation Sunday afternoon, but nothing is known about him at this time outside of a single image.Previously, he had been labeled a person of interest, and police said he might only be a witness to the crime.That changed Sunday afternoon."Since Wednesday February 15th, law enforcement officers have distributed a photo of a person observed on the Delphi Historic Trail. The photo appears to depict a white male wearing blue jeans, a blue coat/jacket, and a hoodie," a statement from the Indiana State Police read.Investigators told ABC News that a search warrant was executed at a home in Delphi on Thursday night, but it did not yield anything of value to the investigation.State police referred to "preliminary evidence" that led their attention to the man in the picture, without detailing what it was."During the course of the investigation, preliminary evidence has led investigators to believe the person, in the distributed photo, is suspected of having participated in the murders of Abigail Williams and Liberty German," the statement added.The case has garnered great attention in the otherwise peaceful area of rural Indiana from which the girls disappeared.On Monday, police told ABC News that people in the small city of Delphi bonded together following the tragedy and have been extremely helpful to the investigation."The people of Delphi are being very helpful," the spokesman said. "They are helping in any way that they can."Thousands gathered in Delphi this weekend to take part in a motorcycle memorial ride to commemorate the lives of the two girls.Organizers for the motorcycle rally estimated that more than 3,000 people took part in the ride on Saturday, while hundreds of spectators watched, according to the Lafayette Journal and Courier, a local paper.The paper said that the downtown area of the small city overflowed with motorcycles and cars, who registered for $20 per driver and $5 per passenger to ride from Office Tavern Bar in Delphi to Whiskey and Wine Saloon in Monticello, and that the funds were split between the families of the two victims.ABC affiliate WRTV in Indianapolis reported that residents of Delphi were applying purple ribbons to their homes and storefronts show their support for the victims and their families.The affiliate also reported that several local businesses in Delphi are hosting fundraisers for the families.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(LOS ANGELES) -- Low fuel prices and economic stability are straining the country's roadways, leading to congestion that cost U.S. drivers nearly $300 billion in wasted gas and time last year, according to a new report released Monday.Los Angeles had the worst traffic in the world among 1,064 cities studied by traffic analytics firm INRIX. L.A. also topped the Kirkland, Washington, firm’s list the year before.On average, Los Angeles motorists spent about 104 hours stuck in traffic during the peak commuting hours of 2016, contributing to a loss of $2,408 per driver, or about $9.7 billion collectively, in wasted fuel and productivity, according to the firm’s Global Traffic Scorecard report.That topped Moscow and New York, where drivers spent an average of 91 hours and 89 hours, respectively, sitting in gridlocked traffic.Overall, U.S. cities accounted for half of the firm’s list of the top 10 most-congested areas worldwide, helped by cheaper U.S. gas prices and a buoyant economy, the report said."A stable U.S. economy, continued urbanization of major cities, and factors such as employment growth and low gas prices have all contributed to increased traffic in 2016," INRIX senior economist Bob Pishue said in a statement.U.S. drivers spent an average of 42 hours a year in traffic during the busiest commuting hours of the year, costing them about $300 billion collectively, or about $1,400 per driver, in squandered gas and time last year, according to the report."Traffic truly is a double-edged sword," Pishue said, adding that he doesn't expect the global traffic situation to improve soon any time soon."The demand for driving is expected to continue to rise, while the supply of roadway will remain flat," Pishue said.He recommends that governments use traffic data and technology to improve traffic flow as they explore new road projects and investments.Separately, in a blog post Friday, INRIX Chief Economist Graham Cookson noted that the causes of congestion are specific to the city and road structures, but he also laid out a few ways that cities could address the problem."Congestion is bad for our wallets and our health, but in one sense it is a good problem to have,” Cookson said. “Roads are the arteries of the economy pumping people and goods around the country. Congestion is the symptom of a rich and prosperous economy."Avoiding peak hour trips through remote working and encouraging the efficient use of our roads through wider adoption of road user pricing could help cities to better manage road demand, Cookson said.He pointed to places like London as an example of a city that is using technology to improve traffic flow.London invested nearly $4.3 billion to improve the roads there, according to the city's website.As part of that initiative, the city placed sensors in 80 percent of the city's roads to detect real-time traffic conditions at junctions and optimize traffic light timings to reduce delays, Cookson noted in his blog post.INRIX said it used anonymous and real-time GPS data to track traffic flows across 38 countries. It also utilized “market-specific criteria that affect traffic,” including construction and road closures, real-time incidents, sporting and entertainment events, weather forecasts and school schedules.
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