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  • Siskiyou County Sheriff(NEW YORK) -- The wife of the former Tennessee teacher who was discovered last week in a rural cabin after over a month on the run with his 15-year-old student, said that he told her that he slept with the teen.Jill Cummins spoke out about 50-year-old Tad Cummins' alleged relationship with Elizabeth Thomas in an exclusive interview with Inside Edition, saying that she asked him, "'Did you sleep with her?' And he said, 'Yes, I did,' and so I did not want any details.""I knew the truth, I just wanted to hear it from him," she added."He kept saying, 'I love you,' but I said 'I'm sorry, but I am not going to say that back,'" Jill Cummins said, adding that he begged her for forgiveness after he was taken into custody by authorities on April 20.Tad Cummins led investigators on a cross-country journey that lasted over a month before he was arrested in Northern California, according to the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation."It was very hard to hear his voice after all this time, not knowing if I was going to hear it again, but he told me he was sorry," Jill Cummins told Inside Edition. "He told me that he loved me and ... please forgive him.""I told him I wouldn't be answering the phone anymore," she added.Jill Cummins told ABC News in a previous interview that she had filed for divorce from Tad Cummins, after more than 30 years of marriage.Tad Cummins faces charges in Siskiyou County, California, for kidnapping and possession of stolen property, according to the sheriff's office. The charges are pending review by Siskiyou County District Attorney Kirk Andrus.
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  • Arkansas Department of Correction(VARMER, Ark.) -- Arkansas executed its fourth prisoner in eight days on Thursday night, within an hour of the U.S. Supreme Court denying a motion for a stay of execution.Kenneth Williams, a 38-year-old man convicted of two murders, was scheduled to be put to death by lethal injection at 7 p.m. local time at a correctional facility in Varmer, but the execution was delayed so that the Supreme Court could resolve a handful of other cases before considering Williams' fate.The execution comes as one of the trio of drugs it uses in lethal injections is due to expire at the end of the month.It is not known how Arkansas will carry out future executions after the drug expires.Williams was serving life in prison for the murder of 19-year-old Dominique Hurd when he escaped in 1999 and killed Cecil Boren. His capture resulted in another man's death, Michael Greenwood, who was killed in a vehicle crash with Williams."The long path of justice ended tonight and Arkansans can reflect on the last two weeks with confidence that our system of laws in this state has worked," said Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson in a statement. "Carrying out the penalty of the jury in the Kenneth Williams case was necessary. There has never been a question of guilt."
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  • Ted Soqui/Corbis via Getty Images(LOS ANGELES) -- John Martin, a retired ABC News national correspondent, is a public policy fellow at the Woodrow Wilson Center for International Scholars in Washington, D.C. This is his first-person essay written for ABC News reflecting on his experiences covering the 1992 Los Angeles riots:On that morning 25 years ago, smoke still hung in the air from the looting and fires the day before, but it seemed the nighttime curfew had worked. Streets were largely deserted, boulevards eerily quiet.The big white stock exchange building was open but almost nobody came to trade. Universities were closed, USC postponed final exams. Workers stayed home.As an ABC News national correspondent walking the streets with a camera crew, I spent 10 days looking for signs of revival and hope. At first, I didn’t see many.“I don’t believe it had anything to do with Rodney King,” said a black woman in front of her looted shop. “I think it had to do with people’s greed.”At a post office, hundreds of people lined up for Social Security checks and monthly welfare assistance.“These are not the people who bombed and looted and destroyed the stores,” said a 20-ish black woman in a bright orange jersey. “These people,” she said, “want get their money.”Meanwhile National Guard troops began streaming off buses. The mayor seemed relieved. “We are going to insure the safety of this city,” said Tom Bradley, a black man and former police officer. “And we are going to take back the streets.”But what would Los Angeles do with its streets? There were 10,000 looted and burned businesses, at least 200 families homeless, food shelves empty, banks littered with ashes, a doctor’s office choked with debris.“The evil act is done,” said Dr. Gerald Fradkoff, an internist who devoted his practice to the aged poor and low-income immigrants.Dropping his singed paper records into a brown cardboard box, the doctor said he would try to renegotiate a low-interest loan from the Small Business Administration.“I have to heal, the city has to heal, and we have to come back together.”Then, suddenly, it started, we began to see a remarkable amount of effort. It was heartening.In Hollywood, volunteers streamed along the sidewalks and in passing trucks, helping wherever they were needed to sweep and clean.In South Central, merchants opened a makeshift store in the parking lot of a burned out supermarket, calling it “Rebuilding Starts Now.”In the city center, 14 architects and lawyers met to plan ways to construct small shopping districts in riot areas to provide food and retail services.“The immediate solution we’ve come up with is temporary structures that will have a lifespan of perhaps one year,” said Roland Wiley, a young black architect.But they needed city building permits and faced a bureaucratic maze.A white-haired white lawyer, Richard Riordan, had a solution:“If you go to them with a concept you will get jerked around for a year or so,” said Riordan. “Go in with a set plan. I will guarantee you…we’ll get that through within a few days.”The plan worked. (So did Riordan’s get-it-done attitude. A year later, he was elected mayor).Meanwhile, a giant drugstore chain offered more hope.Even though it had 19 stores looted and four burned to the ground, a Thrifty executive promised the firm would not abandon the stores that were looted.Still, there was plenty of despair.Richard Kim, owner of a family electronics business, found that looters had stolen 20 percent of his audio equipment and television sets. Fire had destroyed a million dollars of his inventory.“We’re already leveraged out like a lot of businesses in the area,” he said, “We cannot take out any more loans. If the insurance does not cover it, we cannot rebuild.”An
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  • Radimer Lewis Sr.(SEATTLE) -- A heart-stopping accident of nature that unfolded on a Washington state highway was captured on dashcam video.The dramatic video shows that drivers heading southbound on I-5 had no warning when a tree came crashing down, damaging two vehicles on Wednesday afternoon.According to authorities, the force of impact caused windshield damage to one vehicle and crushed the cab of the second vehicle, leaving its female driver badly injured."She was unconscious when troopers and witnesses arrived on scene," Trooper Brooke Bova with Washington State Patrol told ABC Seattle affiliate KOMO-TV.The injured driver was taken to Seattle’s Harborview Medical Center and listed in satisfactory condition.
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  • WABC-TV(NEW YORK) -- An 11-year-old Bronx, New York boy on Tuesday stabbed a home intruder who he said was violently attacking his mother, according to police.The unidentified child stabbed Brian Febus, 22, twice in the back after the man reportedly kicked down the family's apartment door and attacked his mother, ABC affiliate WABC-TV reported on Tuesday, citing police sources.Febus, who's had 14 prior arrests, according to court records, was later arrested on assault and burglary charges in connection with the incident.A neighbor, who asked not to be named, described the incident as "really nasty.""What I know is an unfortunate thing happened to a good person in front of a child that's too young to even have been in this situation," the neighbor told WABC. "It was really nasty."Febus allegedly broke down the door at around 5 p.m. local time after the boy’s 32-year-old mother refused to let him in, according to the WABC report.Febus then allegedly entered the home and punched the woman multiple times, according to the report. Police said it was not immediately clear as to why the man targeted the mother of two, who also has a 4-year old child.The 11-year-old reportedly dialed 911 to report a "robber in the house" and stabbed the man in an effort to fend him off, according to police. The attacker fled the scene, but he was later apprehended at a nearby hospital.The man claimed he sustained the stab wounds during a fight on the street, police said.The boy and his mother were both taken to a nearby hospital for minor injuries, according to the report. The child had scratches on his arm and his mother was treated for a bloody lip and cuts on her arm."It's unfortunate an 11-year-old had to do that but I'm just glad she wasn't more severely injured," another neighbor, Kim Williams, told WABC."If you defend your mother you are a hero," another neighbor, who was not identified, said.
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