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  • artolympic/iStock/Thinkstock(LOS ANGELES) -- A Denver man of Pakistani descent who was arrested in West Los Angeles Thursday, possessed weapons and explosive devices, law enforcement officials told ABC News.The man -- identified Friday as Adam Nauveed Hayat, 35, of Denver, by the U.S. Attorney's Office for the Central District of California -- was found with knives and possibly flew to L.A. while following an ex-girlfriend, according to police.In addition to the knives, law enforcement found explosive devices at a Sheraton Hotel in downtown Denver, where he had stayed. None of the devices were detonated prior to being found.Hayat made his initial appearance in U.S. District Court for the Central District of California Friday afternoon where he was read his rights and advised of the charge pending against him. He was ordered held without bond and ordered removed to Colorado. He will eventually be transferred by the U.S. Marshals Service for further court proceedings.Hayat is charged with one count of possession of firearms not registered with the National Firearms and Registration Transfer Record. The penalty on that charge is not more than 10 years in federal prison, and up to a $250,000 fine.He is a veteran of the U.S. military and served in Iraq and sources close to the investigation told ABC News that the man had sent letters to Veterans Affairs complaining about his treatment by the agency.Investigators were trying to determine whether the man was on the radar of law enforcement agencies prior to his arrest.He was arrested at a Holiday Inn on La Cienenga Boulevard, which is a major thoroughfare that runs North to South through Los Angeles. Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • Snapchat/Liberty German(DELPHI, Ind.)-- Authorities in Indiana have released an image of a man they say was photographed on a nature trail around the same time as two Carroll County teenagers were hiking before they disappeared and were later found dead."We are asking help from the public to help identify him so he can be contacted regarding what he might have seen," police said in a statement Wednesday. "Also, if you were parked at High Bridge Trail Head on February 13, 2017 between 1:00 p.m. and 5:00 p.m. we would like to talk to you."On Wednesday, authorities identified the bodies of Liberty Rose Lynn German, 14, and Abigail J. Williams, 13, both of Delphi. Police said the FBI was assisting in the investigation.Police said the girls had been dropped off for a hike around 1 p.m. Monday. About 2.5 hours later, the girls were nowhere in sight when their families came looking for them, police said.On Tuesday, German and Williams were found around 12:15 p.m., roughly a quarter-mile from an abandoned railroad bridge, near Delphi. Police said they were investigating the deaths as homicides.They did not release a cause of death and did not detail any wounds or injuries the girls may have sustained.Carroll County Sheriff Tobe Leazenby said technology, specifically the girls' social-media accounts and cell phone records, was important to the investigation."At this stage, we don't know whether or not they're, maybe someone, is holding back for fear of something or any other reasons. We honestly don't know but that picture [of the man] is important for us to be able to move forward in this investigation," Leazenby said. "Maybe there's a message that was conveyed, maybe at some point, whether it be social media or any other technology, that we haven't uncovered yet."Leavenby would not say whether the victims' cell phones had been recovered. Police would not disclose the source of the photograph of the man whom they would like to interview."It's a very tight-knit, close community," Leavenby told ABC News today. "It's not like anything we've had in our past. ... This one has a different feel to it. ... These were wonderful girls. ... This was their innocence taken away from them at a very young age."
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  • ABC News(ATLANTA) -- The ex-wife of Justin Ross Harris, the Georgia man who was found guilty of intentionally leaving the couple’s 22-month-old son to die in a hot SUV in June 2014, is speaking out for the first time about why she supported her ex-husband through the trial and continues to support him today.“It never crossed my mind that Ross had done it on purpose,” Leanna Taylor told ABC's Amy Robach in an exclusive interview. “Never. It was an accident.”Watch the interview first on "Good Morning America" and then see more on "20/20" THIS FRIDAY, Feb. 17 at 10 p.m. ETA Georgia jury made up of six men and six women in November found Harris guilty on eight counts, including malice murder and two counts of felony murder, for the death of their son, Cooper Harris. He was sentenced to life without parole.The boy was pronounced dead on June 18, 2014, after authorities said he spent about seven hours alone in a rear-facing car seat in Harris’s locked SUV in the Atlanta area. Temperatures in the area had reached the low 90s outside that day. Authorities ruled that Cooper died of hyperthermia.Taylor said she first learned something was wrong when she went to Cooper’s daycare that afternoon to pick him up.“The day care teacher ... said, ‘Well, Cooper’s not here.’ and I thought she was joking, and I was like, ‘No really, where’s Cooper?’” Taylor said. “And she just looked me dead in the face and got my attention. She was like, ‘He’s not here.’ I didn’t know what to think.”Taylor said her first thought was that someone must have taken him from daycare, and then she said she thought, and admits she said out loud, that Harris must have left him in the car.“Nothing else that my mind was going to made sense,” she said. “The next place my brain went was, ‘Well, maybe Ross left him at home, like, maybe he just forgot to take him to daycare.’ ... he could be a forgetful person.”When a detective told her later that day that her son was dead, Taylor said she felt “numb.”Since 1998, an average of 37 U.S. children have died annually from heatstroke after being trapped inside vehicles, according to the Department of Meteorology and Climate Sciences at San Jose State University, which tracks heatstroke deaths of children in vehicles.Police say Cooper was in the car when Harris drove to work at a Home Depot corporate office that morning, and when Harris went inside, Cooper was left in the vehicle. Surveillance video showed Harris had returned to his car during lunch to put something away, then went back to work. Later that day, after Harris went back again to his car and drove away from work, then he pulled over in a shopping center parking lot where he asked for help, authorities say.Authorities argued that Harris going back to the car at lunch proved he knew Cooper was still there, but Taylor sees it differently.“The going back to the car part actually for me solidifies that it wasn’t intentional,” she said. “To me, it said the opposite, that he didn’t have a clue Cooper was there.”Detectives zeroed in on Harris, but said they were also suspicious of Taylor because they thought her actions that day seemed strange. She had told daycare workers that “Ross must have left him in the car” and detectives said she seemed unemotional when she was told Cooper was dead.Most suspicious, police said, was that while Harris was awaiting questioning at the police station, Taylor was recorded asking him, “Did you say too much?” Later, at Cooper’s funeral, eyewitnesses reported that she seemed unemotional, and that she told people Cooper seemed to be in a better place.Taylor, who was never arrested or charged in the case, said she was just trying to process what had happened.“Nothing about it felt real. Nothing about it fel
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  • Wavebreakmedia Ltd/iStock/Thinkstock(CHARLOTTE, N.C.) -- An American Airlines flight bound for Gulfport, Mississippi, had to make an emergency landing in North Carolina on Wednesday after striking a deer upon takeoff, according to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA).The FAA said the crew aboard flight 5320, operated by PSA Airlines, reported striking the deer as it left Charlotte Douglas International Airport around 11:45 a.m. today.The FAA said the plane landed safely at the Charlotte airport at 12:05 p.m. after declaring the emergency. The flight was headed to Gulfport-Biloxi International Airport in Mississippi.In a statement, American Airlines said the plane, a CRJ 700 aircraft, was carrying 44 passengers and four crew."The airplane came immediately back to the airport and landed safely. There was fuel leaking from the aircraft, so passengers deplaned on the runway and firetrucks did hose the plane down. The passengers have been bused back to the terminal and will get a new aircraft," American Airlines said in its statement.In October 2010, a US Airways jet arriving from Miami, Florida, plowed through a herd of deer shortly after landing at the same Charlotte airport. No injuries were reported on the plane.According to ABC affiliate WSOC-TV, Wednesday's incident occurred on runway 36 center -- the same runway where the herd of deer was struck in 2010.
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  • Scott Olson/Getty Images(BISMARCK, N.D.) -- North Dakota governor Doug Burgum issued an emergency evacuation order Wednesday for the Oceti Sakowin protest camp -- located on the edge of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation -- where Dakota Access Pipeline opponents have spent several months expressing their disdain for the pipeline.Gov. Burgam signed the order "out of concern for the safety of people who are residing on U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) land in southern Morton County and to avoid an ecological disaster to the Missouri River," read a statement from the governor's office.Decreasing temperatures were cited as the impetus in speeding up the camp's clean-up. "Warm temperatures have accelerated snowmelt in the area of the Oceti Sakowin protest camp, and the National Weather Service reports that the Cannonball River should be on the watch for rising water levels and an increased risk of ice jams later this week," reads the statement. "Due to these conditions, the governor’s emergency order addresses safety concerns to human life as anyone in the floodplain is at risk for possible injury or death. The order also addresses the need to protect the Missouri River from the waste that will flow into the Cannonball River and Lake Oahe if the camp is not cleared and the cleanup expedited."The Standing Rock Sioux began coordinating a cleanup in late January, but state officials say it isn't happening fast enough.The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers ordered on Feb. 3 those camping on federal property to vacate to prevent injuries and significant environmental damage in the likely event of flooding in the area.The Oceti Sakowin camp needs to be evacuated no later than Feb. 22 in order to allow private contractors to accelerate the removal of waste from the camp, the governor's office said.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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