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  • SeanPavonePhoto/iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- Washington, D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser ordered the removal of the fake U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) flyers that were posted around the city Thursday, calling it an effort to divide residents in the nation's capital.Tear it down! DC is a sanctuary city. Clearly the flyer is meant to scare and divide our residents. We won't stand for it. #DCValues https://t.co/aCf9ewJ8Ir
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  • Natapols/iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- A 25-year-old woman is in police custody after she allegedly threw her two-year-old son, who was strapped into a stroller, down a set of stairs in a New York City subway station Thursday, ABC affiliate WABC reported, citing the NYPD.The alleged incident took place around 2:30 p.m. in the Bronx at the 149th Street-Grand Concourse station in the borough's Melrose neighborhood.The woman, who has not been identified, was taken to North General Hospital in Manhattan for a psychological evaluation.The toddler was taken to Lincoln Medical Center in the Bronx in serious but stable condition. He suffered cuts to his his face.WABC reported that witnesses called police and alerted two officers that were inside the subway station at the time.The NYPD said the officers noticed the mother at the top of the subway staircase.
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  • AlexKazachok2/iStock/Thinkstock(BOCA RATON, Fla.) -- A sister of missing Florida woman Isabella Hellman, who mysteriously vanished at sea while on a trip with her husband, claims that Hellman's husband killed her, according to a Boca Raton police report.Hellman disappeared over two weeks ago while on a boating trip with her husband Lewis Bennett, the U.S. Coast Guard said.According to ABC affiliate WPBF in West Palm Beach, Bennett told the Coast Guard he and Hellman were aboard his catamaran near the Bahamas on May 14. When Bennett went to bed, he said his wife, who was wearing a life vest at the time, agreed to take watch above deck, the Coast Guard told WPBF. Bennett said he later awoke to something hitting the boat and felt that it was starting to sink, WPBF reported. Bennett couldn’t find his wife, so he jumped onto a life raft and sent out a distress call, he told the Coast Guard. Bennett was found on the life raft on May 15.After days of scouring the waters off the Bahamas, the Coast Guard called off the search for Hellman.After the search ended, Bennett told NBC affiliate WPTV that he planned to fly to Cuba and then get a boat to look for his wife himself, WPTV reported last week. Bennett told WPTV his family was “distraught.”This weekend, Bennett, with his 9-month-old daughter, went to a sister-in-law’s home to collect items he said were taken from his home, including a computer, engagement ring, clothes and handbags, according to a Boca Raton police report. He asked for police to be there -- referred to by police as a "civil standby."The police report says Bennett told one of his sisters-in-law that he knew the items were taken from his home, but the sister-in-law denied taking the items and invited Bennett into the home to look.Another sister-in-law shouted at Bennett to leave and she "repeatedly stated that Lewis killed her sister," the police report said.The police officer said in the report, "Eventually, Lewis and I decided that it was best that he leave since the property was not going to be handed over. Lewis agreed that it was best and left without incident."The police report noted that a federal investigator told the Boca Raton police that Bennett is under investigation for the disappearance of his wife.The Coast Guard told ABC News today that it and the FBI are conducting a joint investigation into the missing persons case but the Coast Guard declined to comment further citing the ongoing investigation.The Palm Beach Post reported that neither the FBI nor Coast Guard "has said specifically that it is targeting Bennett or even that it is looking into the possibility of foul play."
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  • Centre Daily Times/Getty Images(HARRISBURG, Pa.) -- Former Penn State President Graham Spanier should be sent to jail for his role in a "conspiracy of silence" involving Jerry Sandusky, prosecutors in Pennsylvania said in court filing unsealed Thursday.Spanier, who was convicted earlier this year of misdemeanor child welfare endangerment, faces a maximum sentence of a year in jail, according to guidelines cited in the attorney general’s memorandum to the court.Spanier is scheduled to be sentenced Friday, along with former Penn State athletic director Tim Curley and former university vice president Gary Schultz who each pleaded guilty in the case."The crime that these defendants committed has had a profound effect on the children who were victimized by Jerry Sandusky, deputy attorneys general Laura Ditka and Patrick Schulte wrote. "The defendants helped to facilitate this victimization through their conspiracy of silence."The prosecutors declined to recommend a sentence for Curley or Schultz, but said, "Nothing short of a sentence that includes a period of jail time would be an appropriate sentence for Graham Spanier."Spanier said his conviction "will forever alter him and his family" and requested a sentence that includes no time behind bars."Graham Spanier has fallen from being one of the most highly-regarded leaders in American education to being associated with one of the worst episodes in the history of American education," defense attorneys Samuel Silver and Bruce Merenstein wrote. "He will never get beyond that."Defense attorneys also cited Spanier’s age, 69, "worsening health" and "public shaming" in their argument that jail time "is unnecessary to achieve the interests of justice."Prosecutors showed no sympathy and took aim at Spanier’s failure to notify child protective services following Sandusky’s 2001 sexual assault of a child in a Penn State shower."Spanier’s sentence should make it loud and clear that the protection of the welfare Pennsylvania’s children should never take a back seat to the reputation of one man ever again."After Spanier was removed from office in November of 2011, Penn State negotiated a five-year separation agreement with him under which he remained on staff as a tenured faculty member earning $600,000 per year.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • 3DSculptor/iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- The United States conducted a historic successful test of one of its missile defense systems on Wednesday.According to the U.S. Missile Defense Agency, an intercontinental ballistic missile was "successfully intercepted" -- like hitting a bullet with a bullet -- during the first test of its Ground-based Midcourse Defense (GMD) system that targeted a long-range missile.The ground-based interceptor was launched from the Vandenberg Air Force Base in California while the ICMD-target was launched from Kwajalein Atoll in the Pacific Ocean.The GMD system is designed to counter a North Korean missile threat and is just one of many components in the U.S.’s larger missile defense system.In the past, the U.S. has had several canceled programs or abandoned proposals aimed at building up the nation’s missile defense capabilities.The first successful anti-ballistic missileThe Soviets in 1961 successfully launched an anti-ballistic missile (ABM) that intercepted a ballistic missile. The advancement by the Soviets caused the U.S. to test its own ABM system. In 1972, the U.S. and the Soviet Union signed the Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty (AMB Treaty), preventing both countries from building up their missile defense systems.Strategic Defense Initiative - Reagan’s "Star Wars” proposalIn 1983, President Ronald Reagan sought to eliminate the threat of a large-scale nuclear attack with his proposal of the Strategic Defense Initiative, or SDI.“What if free people could live secure in the knowledge that their security did not rest upon the threat of instant U.S. retaliation to deter a Soviet attack, that we could intercept and destroy strategic ballistic missiles before they reached our own soil or that of our allies?” President Reagan said in his March 23, 1983 address to the nation announcing his SDI proposal.Critics dubbed it “Star Wars,” after the science-fiction movie, because the plan included the development of laser systems in space that would detect and shoot down incoming ballistic missiles.The SDI was eventually scaled back by Reagan’s successor, George H. W. Bush.The airborne laserOne idea to shoot down incoming missiles from the sky included strapping lasers to an airplane, dubbed the airborne laser. The concept behind the plane’s development was that the laser would be able to target a ballistic missile while it was in the boost phase shortly after lift-off.In 1996, the Pentagon pushed for the development of an airborne laser weapon system. The result was a modified Boeing 747 with tracking lasers and a chemical oxygen iodine laser (COIL). The Airborne Laser’s first flight was over Kansas in July 18, 2002 and, after a series of flight tests, the COIL laser was test-fired in September 2008.According to the Arms Control Association, the major issue with the airborne laser was that it wasn’t powerful enough, had limited range, and made the 747 vulnerable to anti-aircraft missiles. The airborne laser’s shortcomings led Defense Secretary Robert Gates to cancel the program in 2010.While the Boeing 747 was a no-go, the Pentagon is now envisioning drones with the capability to shoot down ballistic missiles.Ground-based interceptorsIn 2002, President George W. Bush withdrew the U.S. from the 1972 Antiballistic Missile Treaty, saying he believed the U.S. should build up its missile defense system in the wake of September 11th.In 2004, the first GMD interceptors were placed at Fort Greely in Alaska. There are now 32 ground-based interceptors at Fort Greely and four others at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California.The Missile Defense Agency plans to increase the total number of interceptors to 44 by the end of 2017.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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