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  • WABC(WALLINGFORD, Conn.) — At least 12 former faculty members at the elite Connecticut boarding school Choate Rosemary Hall engaged in "substantiated instances of sexual misconduct" with students dating back to the 1960s, the school said in a new report.The report came as a result of an independent investigation led by investigator and former prosecutor Nancy Kestenbaum of Covington & Burling LLP after the school engaged the firm to conduct the investigation.The investigation was announced two months after a former student wrote on a Choate alumni Facebook page about "two former teachers’ sexual misconduct, the impact it has had on her life, and her desire to see Choate take action with respect to reports of sexual misconduct, including her own," the report said. The investigation announcement also came days after the Boston Globe published an article describing misconduct at Choate, among other schools.In a letter last fall, Choate told the school community about the investigation and asked "anyone with possible knowledge of sexual misconduct by faculty or staff at Choate" to contact the school.No reports were received relating to current Choate students and no reports of sexual misconduct were substantiated regarding any current faculty members or staff, the report said.The greatest number of reports concerned "incidents in the 1980s, with roughly half that number in the 1970s and 1990s, and with significantly smaller numbers in the 1960s and 2000s," the report said. "We received a handful of reports of sexual misconduct in the 2010s.""Certain Choate graduates described themselves as having been flattered, at the time," by the attention from adults, but "later recognized that the conduct had been abusive," the report said. "They described Choate faculty and staff engaging in acts with them that included intimate kissing, intimate touching and sexual intercourse.""Other graduates told us of contact that they recognized as abusive at the time, including forced or coerced intercourse, as well as other incidents of unwanted contact that led students to feel betrayed by faculty or staff they had trusted and admired," the report said. "Regardless of how the graduates felt at the time, many reported to us that these physical or sexual encounters with faculty or staff, who had occupied positions of authority and trust, disturbed them throughout their adult lives."Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(LAS VEGAS) — The roof of the famed Bellagio Hotel and Casino caught fire on Thursday night, prompting the closure of the Las Vegas Strip.The Clark County Fire Department responded to the blaze, which they said was difficult to access given its location, but that they had nonetheless managed to knock down the fire.Bystanders in the area, particularly out front of the Bellagio's water fountain -- whose famous water show continued unabated -- could be seen watching the fire with alarm.The CCFD said that no injuries had been reported.The initial call was received at 10:46 PM local time, the CCFD said, and the first units arrived on the scene within five minutes."Firefighting efforts were extremely difficult due to the location of the fire and access to the location," assistant chief Larry Haydu of the CCFD said. Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(MOSCOW, Idaho) — Four people were injured at the University of Idaho campus on Thursday night after an explosion stemming from an experimental rocket test gone awry, school officials and local authorities said.The incident at the college campus in Moscow, Idaho, occurred as individuals were gathered to test the device in an unoccupied parking lot next to a steam plant.Daniel Ewart, vice president of infrastructure at the school, said during a press conference that as a result of the explosion, one individual was put in critical condition while the other three were in stable condition after being taken to Gritman Medical Center.He could not confirm whether those injured were students.Ewart said the campus was considered safe otherwise, but that they were still gathering information and an investigation into the causes of exactly what happened with the initial explosion was ongoing.Capt. Tyson Berrett of the Moscow Police Department said there was no known damage to any buildings. He added that the FBI had come in to join the investigation because of their technical expertise regarding explosions.The explosion occurred at approximately 9:52 p.m. local time. Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • Lindsey Jacobson/ABC News(DELPHI, Ind.) — It's been two months since Indiana eighth-graders Abby Williams and Libby German vanished on a local hiking trail, their bodies later found in the woods. No one has been arrested for their murders, leaving feelings of fear, concern and frustration in their small hometown of Delphi, according to the local sheriff.Carroll County Sheriff Tobe Leazenby is confident there will be an arrest — but he does not know when.Abby, 13, and Libby, 14, who became good friends as teammates on their seventh-grade volleyball team, were enjoying a day off from Delphi Community Middle School on Feb. 13 when they disappeared on a hiking trail near their rural hometown. Their bodies were found the next day.Police have released two clues that could lead to an arrest: a photo of a man who police say is the prime suspect in the investigation and a chilling recording found on Libby's phone with just three audible words: "Down the hill."The girls' friend, 14-year-old Arika Gibson, described Libby as a "band geek" who was outgoing and smart.Libby "was huge on science," she said. "Our science teacher ... inspired her to be a science teacher."Libby was also close to her family. "[She] loved her mom so much," Arika said, and was a shoulder to cry on for her big sister. “They'd do everything together.”As investigation of Indiana teens' mysterious murder enters 4th week, tips pour in and reward surgesAbby, meanwhile, was "quiet in front of people, but she was not quiet at all in front of [our group of friends],” Arika said.Arika said she and Abby "both had the same dream of doing something within forensics and police work.""She wanted to help people," Arika said. "We talked about it all the time in school.”The girls' murders shocked the small town of Delphi, where a crime like this had never happened before.Now, two months later, Leazenby told ABC News there's still fear, concern and frustration in the tight-knit, "small-town USA" community of nearly 3,000 people."There's still some fear and some concern out there, because obviously no one has been arrested at this point," Leazenby said on Wednesday. "But there's still a lot of support behind the investigation.""I can also sense some frustration of they're not being a resolution at this point," he continued. "That's, in my opinion, that's a natural human feeling ... this is, again, unlike anything this county has ever experienced and therefore maybe ... the fear of the unknown."Greg Briles, the superintendent of schools for the Delphi Community School Corporation, told ABC News on Thursday, "There's still some grieving going on" for students at the middle school, "but they're working through it."Fundraisers in town, including a bake sale and car wash, are raising money for a softball field in honor of Abby and Libby, Briles said."[It] warms your heart that these people are coming out to build something that's going to be there for years and years to come, that'll be in remembrance of those girls," Briles said. "They'll remember that those girls had a love and a passion for softball ... [and] everybody in our community had a love and a passion for those girls' lives.""I think our students and families and members of the community would like to see closure," Briles said, adding that he knows Abby's and Libby's families would like closure.Sgt. Kim Riley of the Indiana State Police told ABC News Wednesday that police are still working leads and he is "still confident that we will make an arrest."Over 15,000 tips have poured in and a reward has climbed to more than $234,000, Riley said.Leazenby said authorities follow each tip they get, and he said about 14 investigators — from the FBI, Indiana State Police, Delphi police and Carroll County Sheriff's Office — are working on the case each day.Leazenby said sheriff's offices throughout the state offered their assistance in the investigation.Though two months have gone by, the sh
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  • KABC(SAN BERNARDINO, Calif.) — A 9-year-old boy injured during a school shooting in San Bernardino, California, earlier this week is "recovering well," school officials said.The San Bernardino City Unified School District posted an update Wednesday on Facebook on behalf of student Nolan Brandy and his family, thanking "the community for the outpouring of prayers and support they have received."The school district also posted an image of a smiling Nolan in his hospital bed with a blue-and-white stuffed animal and his parents huddling close to him."We are grateful," the family stated in the post. "Please continue to pray for him and also for Jonathan Martinez’s and Karen Smith's families,” the family said, referring to 8-year-old student Jonathan Martinez and teacher Karen Elaine Smith, who both died in the attack.The violence occurred Monday morning when Smith's estranged husband opened fire in her classroom at North Park Elementary School, according to the San Bernardino Police Department.Authorities said the gunman, Cedric Anderson, of Riverside, California, entered the school on a visitor’s pass and opened fire on his 53-year-old wife, killing her, before turning the gun on himself.The students, who were reportedly standing behind Smith when she was shot, were not the intended targets, according to police.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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