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  • iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- Hewing closely to the fiery rhetoric that defined his campaign, Donald Trump during his inaugural address painted a bleak picture of life for some in the United States, promising to end what he called the "American carnage," turn the Washington establishment on its head, give voice to the "forgotten" and work tirelessly to put "America first."During the campaign, Trump frequently told rally-goers about what he described as the horrors of the inner cities, the tragedy of the education system and the extent to which the United States was being taken advantage of around the globe, offering his leadership as an alternative."Mothers and children trapped in poverty in our inner cities, rusted-out factories scattered like tombstones across the landscape of our nation. An education system flush with cash but which leaves our young and beautiful students deprived of all knowledge," he told the crowd. "And the crime and the gangs and the drugs that have stolen too many lives and robbed our country of so much unrealized potential. This American carnage stops right here and stops right now."As he also promised on the campaign trail, the buck stops with him."From this day forward, a new vision will govern our land. From this day forward, it's going to be only America first. America first. Every decision — on trade, on taxes, on immigration, on foreign affairs — will be made to benefit American workers and American families," Trump said in his roughly 16-minute inauguration speech, the shortest since President Jimmy Carter's in 1977."This moment is your moment. It belongs to you," he said. "It belongs to everyone gathered here today and everyone watching all across America."He pledged to give voice to "the forgotten men and women" and called for a return of power to the American people from the politicians in Washington."I will fight for you with every breath in my body, and I will never let you down," he said.And he sent a warning to lawmakers that he views as ineffectual."In America, we understand that a nation is only living as long as it is striving. We will no longer accept politicians who are all talk an no action, constantly complaining but never doing anything about it. The time for empty talk is over. Now arrives the hour of action."Trump closed his speech with his oft-repeated campaign slogan."Together we will make America strong again. We will make America wealthy again. We will make America proud again. We will make America safe again. And, yes, together, we will make America great again," he exclaimed.After the inauguration ceremony, the Trumps escorted the Obamas to a waiting helicopter, which will take the former president and first lady to Joint Base Andrews, after which they headed to California.Trump then signed several documents, including the waiver allowing retired Marine Gen. James Mattis to serve in his Cabinet, while surrounded by his family and political leaders. From there, the group went to the Statuary Hall in the Capitol for a luncheon before the parade.While making brief remarks at the end of the luncheon, Trump said he was "very, very honored" that Bill and Hillary Clinton attended the inauguration, prompting a standing ovation for the pair."I have a lot of respect for those two people. Thank you for being here," he said.The Trump family left the Capitol in a motorcade en route to the White House. They got out of the vehicle twice, walking for short stretches and waving to the crowds lining the street.Trump faces a divided nation that is still reeling from the long and contentious presidential race. Hillary Clinton, Trump's general election rival, attended Friday's ceremony and was seated just a few rows behind Trump and members of his family.Trump and Vice President Mike Pence were sworn in by Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas. Immediately after his swearing-in, Trump embraced members of his family and waved to the crowd on the National Mall.Earlier in the day
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — The weather forecast is looking bleak for Donald Trump's inauguration.Some drizzle or a shower could begin as early as 7 a.m. in Washington, D.C., with temperatures hovering in the mid-30s.By 9:30 a.m. steadier rain is forecast to move into D.C., but temperatures will be warming up into the 40s.However, by noon — right when Trump is scheduled to be sworn in as the 45th president of the United States — heavy showers could be moving in with some moderate to potentially heavy rain.The rain is expected to leave the area by about 1 p.m., when temperatures will be near 50.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — Less than 24 hours after Donald Trump takes the oath of office in Washington, D.C., to become the 45th president of the United States, hundreds of thousands of people from across the country will descend upon the nation’s capital to participate in the Women’s March.The march — which will begin with a rally featuring speakers and musical acts — is based on a mission that the rhetoric of the 2016 election cycle “insulted, demonized, and threatened” Americans, leaving communities “hurting and scared.”Organizers say one of the goals of the march is to tell the new administration that on Day 1, “women's rights are human rights.” Despite the name of the event, leaders have made clear that all are welcome to join, not just women.Organizing the event began shortly after Election Day with a Facebook post by Hawaiian grandmother Teresa Shook, who asked friends about marching together as women on the inauguration. Her question soon escalated to a Facebook event, which received hundreds of thousands of RSVPs. But the Women’s March on Saturday isn’t limited to D.C. — “sister marches” and rallies are planned in locations as distant as Nairobi, Kenya, and Osaka, Japan, as well as in most major U.S. cities.The march is billed by organizers as a nonpartisan opportunity for people to “stand together in solidarity with our partners and children for the protection of our rights, our safety, our health, and our families — recognizing that our vibrant and diverse communities are the strength of our country.”With the event happening on the new president’s first full day in the White House, critics contend the march is a protest against Trump’s presidency, particularly as organizations that opposed the president-elect’s campaign joined as partners. The ACLU, Amnesty International, Emily’s List, Planned Parenthood, GLAAD and the Muslim Women’s Alliance all signed on as the event grew in size.Before the march begins, a three-hour rally will be held on the National Mall with musical headliners Janelle Monae, Questlove, and Grimes, along with celebrity speakers that include America Ferrera, Angela Davis, Gloria Steinem, Ashley Judd, Melissa Harris-Perry, and Michael Moore. Planned Parenthood president Cecile Richards is one of the keynote speakers at the event as well.Singer Beyonce has not been confirmed at the event but did post a message to her Facebook page Wednesday writing, “Together with Chime for Change, we raise our voices as mothers, as artists, and as activists. As #GlobalCitizens, we can make our voices heard and turn awareness into meaningful action and positive change. #WomensMarch.”Her sister, Solange, will be in Washington for the Peace Ball — an alternative event happening at the same time as the Trump inauguration balls.The Washington, D.C., Homeland Security and Emergency Management Agency estimates as many as 400,000 people could attend the march, with over 1.3 million registering on the Women’s March website to join around the world.The rally in Washington kicks off at 10 a.m. Saturday, starting at the intersection of Independence Avenue and Third Street Southwest in Washington, D.C., just blocks from the Capitol.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — As thousands of people descend on Washington D.C. for the inauguration of President-elect Donald Trump, months of security planning, intelligence gathering and coordination are coming to fruition to protect lawmakers and the public.The event, like the pope’s visit and the Democratic and Republican national conventions, is designated as a national security event, which unlocks federal resources and allows Secret Service to assume the leadership role for security.While there are no specific or credible threats, almost every federal partner imaginable will be contributing to the security apparatus this weekend, including the FBI, ATF, Park Police, Customs and Border Protection, the Coast Guard, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Department of Energy.The United States Capitol Police Department is responsible for securing the Capitol and the Metropolitan Police Department will be primarily protecting the parade route, while still serving the entire city outside of inaugural activities.In addition, more than 3,000 police officers from around the country are expected and National Guard troops will be patrolling.The PlanningThe planning process has been going on for well over a year, with various agencies holding tabletop exercises, coordination drills and working to staff the massive security undertaking.The Secret Service trained for nearly every contingency. In a simulation, agents practiced how they would handle a drone spraying weaponized gas on the president and the crowd, a suicide vehicle attack as well as administering first aid if the president himself is attacked.“Our number one concern is to keep our protectees and the general public safe and secure during all the inauguration events,” said Brian Ebert, Secret Service Special Agent in Charge.Customs and Border Protection (CBP), which will be contributing to air support on Inauguration Day, did test runs around Washington, D.C. in the week leading up to the event to make sure communication systems were functioning.“With the heightened awareness — the possible threats — we just want to do everything we can to put a stop to that,” a CBP pilot told ABC News' Senior Justice Correspondent Pierre Thomas on one of the test flights in a AS350 A-Star helicopter.The Metropolitan Police Department (MPD) sent personnel to the Democratic and Republican national conventions last year to study the security procedures there, as well studying local demonstrations in Washington, D.C. to prepare for the rallies expected this weekend, some of which has already taken place throughout the city.“We expect by and large, people come here to exercise their First Amendment rights, that's what Washington, D.C. is all about. In the event we have a few that want to create problems, if they break the law, we'll be able to handle that as well,” said MPD interim Police Chief Peter Newsham.He added that if something happens in D.C., “it won't be for a lack of planning.”Security MeasuresLaw enforcement sources from across government told ABC News that they are utilizing a “multi-layered” approach to security.There will be visible layers, like physical barriers, checkpoints with magnetometers, bag searches and patrolling uniformed officers, as well as hidden layers, such as plainclothes officers inside and outside of the perimeter, radiation detection and surveillance cameras."We talk through and identify and gaps in our training or in our communications. So we plan for those up front. On game day, it is seamless, and that is so important, because real-time information is where it's at," said Park Police Chief Robert MacLean.Major roads, tunnels and bridges leading to the Capitol and downtown D.C. will be closed.To protect against a possible vehicle attack, like those that have happened recently in Germany and France, trucks filled with sand will be deployed to block the parade p
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  • Twitter/@FLOTUS(WASHINGTON) — With just hours remaining until Michelle Obama goes from being first lady to mere mortal, she took to her social media accounts Wednesday to bid adieu to her soon-to-be former life."Being your First Lady has been the honor of a lifetime. From the bottom of my heart, thank you. -mo," the first lady wrote on her Twitter and Instagram accounts alongside a photo of her and the president with their arms around each other. Shot from behind, the first couple are looking toward the Washington Monument from a White House balcony.
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