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  • Julian Gavino(ORLANDO, Fla) -- Atlas, a service dog with a stuffed Pluto toy at home, experienced a little magic during one his weekly trips to Disney World. The golden retriever was visiting the amusement park with his owner Julian Gavino and met a giant-sized version of his favorite character at Magic Kingdom. Atlas likes nothing better than chomping on his little stuffed yellow Pluto, Gavino told ABC News, a toy that Atlas "loves so much." That's until he came snout-to-snout with an oversized Pluto at the park. The long-overdue encounter finally came to pass when Atlas and Gavino, 22, who is in a wheelchair, visited the Japan Pavilion at Epcot Center Friday night. The two connected when Gavino, who has a connective tissue disorder called Ehlers Danlos Syndrome type 3, brought him home from New Horizons Service Dogs in Orange City, Florida. But when Atlas noticed Pluto, his tail wagged wildly, and he sniffed noses with Pluto. The character squatted to receive the dog, who licked an eyelid as one of Gavino's friends captured the precious moment on video. “Atlas was more than excited to meet his best pal look alike,” Gavino commented on his video, which since he posted it has gone viral.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(LOUISVILLE, Ky.) -- A former assistant police chief for a Kentucky police department allegedly instructed a police recruit to shoot black minors if he were to catch them smoking marijuana, according to court documents. In an Aug. 31 letter to Prospect, Kentucky Mayor John Evans, Jefferson County Attorney Mike O'Connell wrote that he has "serious concerns" about the then-assistant police chief Todd Shaw, who at the time was acting chief for the city of Prospect, a suburban city in the Louisville metropolitan area. When senior Jefferson County prosecutors met with members of the Louisville Metro Police Department, they reviewed "highly disturbing racist and threatening Facebook private messages" Shaw exchanged with a former LMPD police recruit, the letter states. The prosecutors were there to conduct an investigation to determine whether to file criminal against Shaw, O'Connell said. The prosecutors found the messages while investigating a case in which Shaw allegedly tried to assist another officer by improperly accessing the National Crime Information Center database, his attorney in the criminal case, Nick Mudd, told ABC News. Prosecutors have dropped efforts file criminal charges against Shaw in that case, Mudd said, adding that he "did nothing wrong." The Facebook messages of concern, which accompanied the letter O'Connell sent to Evans, occurred from September to October 2016, O'Connell said. In the Facebook messages, Shaw and the recruit discussed a scenario for the recruit's training in which he had to write a paper on the "right thing to do" if he were to come across three juveniles who were smoking marijuana, O'Connell wrote. The recruit appears to have come to Shaw for advice, telling him, "I'm so confused about this paper," in the message, dated Oct. 5, 2016. "F--- the right thing," Shaw allegedly wrote. "If black shoot them." Shaw allegedly made other "racially threatening statements," which included instructions on "how to handle the juveniles' parents," according to the letter. "...if mom is hot then f--- her," Shaw allegedly wrote. "...if dad is hot then handcuff him and make him s--- my d---." Shaw allegedly continued, "Unless daddy is black...Then shoot him..." In another alleged message, dated Sept. 24, 2016, the recruit told Shaw that he didn't think he will be the class leader in his recruit class because a former corrections officer was in the class. Shaw then allegedly told that recruit that he was required to sign a form saying he "wasn't racist or associated with racists or associated with racist or hate groups per some KY law." "What has POLICING come to when all you can shoot are white people and injured deer," Shaw allegedly wrote. "Lol." "As Jefferson County Attorney, I feel compelled to notify and warn you of Shaw's deeply offensive and racist statements," O'Connell wrote to the mayor. "There is no place in police departments for men or women who hold such strongly held prejudices, including recommending shooting people simply because of their race." O'Connell stressed how "disturbing" it was that a senior law enforcement officer with more than 20 years of experience was expressing racist views to a "young recruit." The letter to the mayor included attachments of the relevant Facebook messages and copied in other relevant officials, including the Prospect Police Chief and the Louisville Metro Police Chief. In another alleged message on April 8, 2017, Shaw allegedly referred to Martin Luther King Jr. as "nothing but a [racist] womanizer." "But because someone shot him, I get a day off with pay each year so I will take it," the message allegedly stated. Shaw also allegedly wrote on March 6, 2017 that he needed "target practice" when referring to the "revitalized Russell neighborhood," named after African-American educator and Kentucky native Harvey Clarence Russell. On Thursday, Shaw filed a motion for a restraining order or temporary injunction in a Jefferson County circuit court, s
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  • Presley Ann/Getty Images(LOS ANGELES) -- Natalie Portman revealed on Saturday that she was the object of a rape fantasy at the age of 13 and gave up on numerous roles while suffering through what she called an "environment of sexual terrorism." The Oscar-winning actress spoke from a stage before thousands of people in downtown Los Angeles as part of the Women's March, according to a CNN report. Portman turned 12-years-old when on the set of "The Professional," where her drug-dealing father and the rest of her family are killed by crooked cops and she mounts a revenge and forges a bond with a mob hitman named Léon played by Jean Reno. After the film was released in 1994, Portman said, she was excited she was to receive her first fan mail, only "to read a rape fantasy that a man had written me," according to CNN. She said that critics "talked about my budding breasts in reviews." "I understood very quickly, even as a 13-year-old, that if I were to express myself sexually I would feel unsafe and that men would feel entitled to discuss and objectify my body to my great discomfort." She said that the shame compounded when a local radio station established a "countdown" until Portman turned 18 -- "euphemistically the date that I would be legal to sleep with," she said. She said she turned down acting roles "that involved a kissing scene" and turned to ones that "emphasized how bookish I was and how serious I was," adding it had an impact on the way she dressed. Portman said she expressed herself as "prudish, conservative, nerdy and serious" to be heard and feel safe. "At 13 years old, the message from our culture was clear to me: I felt the need to cover my body and to inhibit my expression and my work in order to send my own message to the world that I'm someone worthy of safety and respect," Portman said. "The response to my expression, from small comments about my body to more threatening deliberate statements, served to control my behavior through an environment of sexual terrorism."Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEWARK, N.J.) -- A television film crew was arrested on Thursday after attempting to pass a suspicious item with "all of the makings of an improvised explosive device" through security at Newark Liberty International Airport. “At least seven individuals have been arrested by Port Authority Police after Transportation Security Administration (TSA) officers detected a suspicious item in a carry-on bag,” said TSA in a statement. A preliminary investigation revealed some members of the group intentionally carried the item through the security checkpoint while others in the group covertly filmed the encounter. Their goal was to see whether or not the TSA would detect the item, which was concealed in a rolling bag. TSA officers did in fact detect it, and the film crew was arrested on multiple charges. The Star-Ledger reported that the crew was filming for cable network CNBC. The perpetrators face possible civil penalties by TSA, and can be charged over $13,000 per security violation.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- 2018 has arrived and is off to a bone-chilling start. Just ask the more than 200 million people in the U.S. currently in the grips of a New Year's Day deep freeze encompassing almost the entire eastern two-thirds of the country. The extreme cold was responsible for at least five deaths, as records fell from the Midwest to the Northeast. In St. Paul, Minnesota, 10 people were taken to the hospital for carbon monoxide poisoning. Authorities said a faulty boiler was likely to blame. All 10 were hospitalized in stable condition, according to ABC affiliate KSTP-TV. There were wind-chill alerts in effect from Texas to Maine today, with life-threatening wind chills felt from the upper Midwest to northern New England. Firefighters battled a house fire in Lincoln, Nebraska, in minus 10 degrees as their hoses sprayed water that quickly turned to ice. And in Washington, D.C., firefighters had to use flares to thaw frozen ladders as they tried to tame a two-alarm blaze. In Chicago, today felt like it was below zero throughout the day and wind chills stuck in the single digits in New York City. In New York City, the air temperature was 9 degrees at midnight for the ball drop -- making it the second-coldest on record and the coldest New Year's celebration in a century. Wind chills dipped below zero much of the night. The Deep South has not been spared from the freezing conditions. Temperatures dropped into the teens this morning, making cities like Jackson, Mississippi, feel like they were in the single digits around sunrise. There were also icy roads in Dallas, Texas, in the last 24 hours and this morning it felt like the temperatures were in the teens in New Orleans, Louisiana. It will be another frigid morning across much of the country Tuesday, with temperatures feeling like it's below zero once again from the Midwest to New England. There will be single-digit wind chills from Denver, Colorado, to Little Rock, Arkansas, and New York City. And the Southern states will be the same -- from Dallas, Texas, and New Orleans to Tallahassee, Florida, residents will also feel like temperatures are in the teens early Tuesday morning. Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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