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  • ABC News(NEW YORK) -- The coldest air of the season has moved in and it feels more like mid-January than November from the Midwest to the Northeast.This Arctic blast has also triggered lake-effect snow showers and the first snow of the season for Chicago this morning. Heavy lake-effect snow bands caused accidents and spin-outs across parts of Northern Michigan overnight.On Friday morning, record lows were tied or broken from Minnesota to Michigan:
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  • @Salcedoseth/Instagram(NEW YORK) -- New York City's subway rats can't get enough of the delicious fast food riders discard during their daily commutes.More than two years after Pizza Rat caused an internet sensation after it was seen carrying a slice more than twice its size, two rats were seen at the 14th Street L station battling it out for a single French fry.Instagram user Seth Salcedo spotted the rats as he was waiting for the train Thursday, he told ABC News. The rats engage in a tug-of-war scuffle over the coveted fry before one of them pulls it away and runs off.The other rat doesn't let the victor get away too easy and chases it -- in hopes of regaining the prize -- before the pair disappear under the subway tracks.
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  • iStock/Thinktsock(SAN FRANCISCO) -- Video has been released from an October incident at San Francisco International Airport, in which air traffic controllers were unable to reach the pilots of an incoming Air Canada plane for more than 35 seconds."Air Canada 781, go around," an air traffic controller can be heard saying repeatedly in audio.According to the Federal Aviation Administration, which is investigating the incident, Air Canada flight 781 from Montreal, Quebec, failed to respond Oct. 22 to six separate calls from the air traffic control tower to abort its landing."The pilots acknowledged landing clearance when they entered final approach to San Francisco but was later told six times to abort the landing and 'go around,'" the FAA said in October. "It appears the pilots didn't hear the controller."Air traffic controllers even tried using a flashing red light gun to get pilots' attention, which the FAA said was "standard protocol when an air crew is not responding to radio instructions."According to ABC station KGO-TV, which obtained the footage, authorities were particularly worried because an aircraft was already on the ground.As controllers tried to reach the Air Canada pilots, KGO said, a United flight that had landed previously was being asked to move quickly so it would avoid a different United flight that was landing on an adjacent runway."United 2065, without delay. Cross 28 left," an air traffic controller says. "Contact ground point 8 without delay, please. Traffic coming 2 mile final and they're fast."The Air Canada flight, an Airbus A320-200, landed safely at 9:26 p.m. local time with pilots finally contacting the tower."Yeah, Air Canada 781. ... There's a problem with the radio here," the pilot can be heard saying."That's, uh, pretty evident," an air traffic controller says.In a statement on Friday, Transport Canada told ABC News: "Following the incident at San Francisco International Airport on October 22, Transport Canada is in contact with Air Canada to establish facts and verify compliance with safety regulations."
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  • ABC News(NEW YORK) -- Those in the Northeast are breaking out winter hats and mittens for the first time this season as an arctic front is moving through the I-95 corridor Friday and ushering in the coldest air of the season.Behind the arctic front, wind chills are below zero and in the single digits in Midwest. These wind chills will move into the Northeast later Friday morning and into the afternoon and night.The Northeast will have the coldest temperatures Friday night into Saturday morning, with ABC News forecasting record lows for Washington, D.C., New York City and Boston in the lower to middle 20s.Wind chills will be even colder, teens and single digits will be in most of the New England and I-95 corridor.Because of the arctic air mass, the National Weather Service has issued multiple warnings and advisories for 16 states from Alabama to Michigan and east to New York.Snow will be the problem around the Great Lakes.Lake effect snow will continue around the Great Lakes from Michigan to New York and Pennsylvania, with some snow also possible in New Hampshire, Vermont and Maine. Locally, 2 to 4 inches is possible around the lakes and maybe an inch or two in western New York, Pennsylvania and New England, ABC News forecasts.A new storm system will move through the Midwest and the Great Lakes Friday night into Saturday, bringing more snow from Minnesota to Wisconsin and into Michigan. A winter storm watch has been issued for parts of the area with 5 to 9 inches of snow possible locally near the lakes. Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • Evan Simon/ABC News(BOSSIER CITY, La.) -- Sterling Crutcher grew up idolizing his grandfather, and he said his desire to join the military was shaped in part by years of hearing his stories.“He was always a big proponent of the military," Crutcher told ABC News.Crutcher's grandfather recounted stories of the missions he had been on and his life in the armed forces."We heard them all," Crutcher remembers.In 2015, Crutcher ended up following in his grandfather's footsteps and joined the Air Force. He currently serves as an airman first class and munitions technician based at Barksdale Air Force Base in Bossier City, La. But now, his desire to serve in the military for his entire career may be cut short for one reason: Crutcher is openly transgender.On July 26, President Donald Trump announced a ban on transgender individuals serving in any capacity in the U.S. military on Twitter. On Aug. 25, the White House issued a presidential memorandum giving Defense Secretary James Mattis until Feb. 21, 2018, to come up with a plan “to return to the longstanding policy and practice on military service” that banned openly transgender service members from serving.In the meantime, Crutcher and others are living in a sort of limbo. He reacted to Trump's tweets in July by posting a message on Facebook that went viral."I put on this uniform every day not for praise or adoration. Not for some free healthcare. I do it because it was ingrained in me as a child by my grandfather. He spoke so highly and proudly of his years of service in the army. I joined because there is a sense of pride you get from serving your country and fighting for your neighbors," Crutcher wrote in the post, which has received more than 115,000 likes.But Crutcher said he received mixed reactions to his decision to speak out."It was hard to see and read [the negative responses] but you know, I decided it doesn't matter. The people that I'm working for, if they see that I'm doing a good job, then that's what matters. Because as long as I'm doing my job and I'm sticking to my oath, I will always put the mission first," Crutcher said."I've done that in the past and I'll continue to do that and I think that's what matters," he added.The negative Facebook comments about his service weren't the first time he has received backlash after coming out as a trans man. He said his wife, Aimee, has always been supportive, but that wasn't the case with the rest of his immediate family.Instead, he said his fellow airmen have become more than just his friends. They’ve become his family.“They still dead-name me,” Crutcher said, referring to the fact that some of his family still refers to him by the female name he was given at birth. “They still poignantly point out female pronouns, stuff like that.”Instead, he said his friends on the base in Shreveport have become an alternative family.“There’s a couple in the Air Force that I consider my Air Force mom and dad because they really stepped up, they took me in when I was down. They took me in when I was hurting,” he said.But Trump's proposed ban on openly transgender service members has put his and Aimee's dreams of starting their own family on hold. The couple said they had been planning to start having kids in the near future but are now focusing on saving money in case he is barred from serving in the military. They worry that if the ban is enacted, they will be forced to move off the Air Force base and start anew somewhere else.“I didn't want to believe that a tweet had that much weight on our life,” Aimee Crutcher said. “I told my husband, ‘Don't worry, it's just a tweet.’ I think we both knew deep down it was going to become more than that.”See more of Sterling Crutcher’s story when “Under Review,” a new short documentary from ABC News Features, releases on Nov. 16.
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