• Hemera/Thinkstock(LAFAYETTE, Ind.) — The winning ticket for Wednesday's Powerball drawing, worth an estimated $435.3 million, was sold in Indiana, a spokesperson for the Hoosier Lottery confirmed early Thursday morning.The spokesperson said the ticket was sold at a gas station in Lafayette, Indiana, which is about an hour northwest of Indianapolis.It's the first time that the jackpot topped $400 million in nearly three months, and it's the seventh largest jackpot win in Powerball history.The numbers drawn Wednesday were 52, 10, 61, 28, and 13. The Powerball is 2.The $435.3 million jackpot is paid out over 29 years.If no one claims the winning ticket, the prize will increase again ahead of Saturday's drawing.Powerball is played in 44 states, plus Washington, D.C., Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • Scott Olson/Getty Images(CANNONBALL, N.D.) -- Authorities have ended negotiations with the remaining protesters of the Dakota Access Pipeline and have moved into the camp after some occupiers refused to leave, despite an evacuation order set by state and federal authorities.Some inside the camp were granted ceremonial arrests, authorities said, which involves them giving themselves up voluntarily to be peacefully arrested. Police used plastic zip ties to restrain the protesters who surrendered on the street.At least nine people who did not surrender voluntarily have been arrested thus far after the evacuation deadline expired, authorities said in a briefing Wednesday afternoon, adding that they estimate about 50 to 75 people remain in the camp currently.It is unclear what authorities plan to do to remove the protesters who refuse to leave and resist arrest.Officials said earlier that the Oceti Sakowin camp, which is situated at the edge of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe reservation near Cannonball, North Dakota, must be evacuated Wednesday by 2 p.m. local time and re-entry would not be permitted. Camp residents there were seen lighting fires early this morning, just hours before the deadline.North Dakota Gov. Doug Burgum has set up a travel assistance center that will offer each protester water, snacks, a food voucher, a personal hygiene kit, a health and wellness assessment, hotel lodging for one night, a taxi voucher to the bus terminal, and bus fare for a return trip home. Transportation will be provided from Oceti Sakowin camp to the travel assistance center in Bismarck.“This free service will provide protesters with support as they prepare for their return home,” Burgum’s office said in a Facebook post on Tuesday night. “All camp residents are encouraged to take advantage of these amenities.”  Last week, Burgum signed an emergency evacuation order for the Oceti Sakowin camp that reaffirmed a Feb. 22 deadline set by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe began coordinating a cleanup in late January, but state officials said it wasn't happening fast enough. The governor’s emergency evacuation order cited increasing temperatures and the threat of flooding as the impetus in accelerating the camp’s cleanup."Warm temperatures have accelerated snowmelt in the area of the Oceti Sakowin protest camp, and the National Weather Service reports that the Cannonball River should be on the watch for rising water levels and an increased risk of ice jams later this week," the statement from Burgum’s office read."Due to these conditions, the governor’s emergency order addresses safety concerns to human life as anyone in the floodplain is at risk for possible injury or death. The order also addresses the need to protect the Missouri River from the waste that will flow into the Cannonball River and Lake Oahe if the camp is not cleared and the cleanup expedited," the statement added.The Cannonball River is a tributary of the Missouri River. How it all beganThe 1,172-mile pipeline is nearly finished except for a 1.25-mile segment, part of which will run under Lake Oahe, a Missouri River reservoir in North Dakota just upstream of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe reservation. Construction of this final phase has been the focus of a contentious legal battle and massive protests in recent months.While the Army Corps says this area is federally owned land, the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe cites an 1851 treaty that it says designates the land for Native American tribes. The tribe, which claims its members were never meaningfully consulted before construction began, sued in July to block the four-state crude oil pipeline. That lawsuit is pending, and the Army Corps and the company behind the pipeline argued in court papers that they followed a standard review process.The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe has been at the forefront of the fight against the $3.8 billion Dakota Access Pi
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  • WFTS(NEW YORK) -- The wife of the former police captain accused of fatally shooting a man in a Florida movie theater testified in court Wednesday in a hearing that will determine if his claim of self-defense meets the criteria under Florida's Stand Your Ground law.Curtis Reeves, 74, is accused of shooting and killing 43-year-old Chad Oulson on Jan. 13, 2014, during a confrontation over texting before a showing of "Lone Survivor" at a movie theater in Wesley Chapel, police said.If Circuit Court Judge Susan Barthle rules in favor of Reeves, he will receive immunity from prosecution and will leave court as a free man with no criminal murder charges.Should Barthle decide Reeves did not meet the criteria to "stand his ground" during the encounter with Oulson, he will proceed to a criminal trial at a later date, where he can claim self-defense in the shooting but will not be able to utilize the protection under the Stand Your Ground law.Prosecutors say Reeves provoked the confrontation, The Associated Press reported, meaning he wouldn't be protected by the Stand Your Ground law.Reeves has been present for the hearings, which began Monday and will run through March 3. Curtis Reeves' wife, Vivian Reeves, testified in a Dade City courtroom Wednesday that she and her husband had made a "spur-of-the-minute" decision to see the movie with their son, Matt, because he had read the book of the same title. They chose a matinee showing since it was "cheaper," she said.After the family bought popcorn and a drink at the concessions stands and used the restroom, they entered the theater, where Vivian Reeves said she noticed Oulson with his phone out and the screen lit. Oulson, who was sitting directly in front of her, was not talking on the phone, she said, and the previews had not yet started.After a message instructing viewers to turn off their cellphones came on, Vivian Reeves said she saw her husband leaning toward Oulson, who was "very loud" as he was speaking to Reeves. She said he heard him use the word "f---" or "f---ing" and said something about texting his daughter.“It scared me," she said of the initial encounter between Oulson and her husband. "I was horrified that somebody would act like that, especially in a movie theater.”Her husband then told her, "I'm going to get the manager," she said. When he returned, she handed him the popcorn and he sat down, she said. 'Stand Your Ground' hearing: Reeves' wife heard Chad Oulson yell at her husband.."you told on me, who the f*** do you think you are?” pic.twitter.com/hSpYdDu0Ln
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  • ABC News(NEW YORK) --  It was five years ago this month that Trayvon Martin, an unarmed African-American 17-year-old from Miami Gardens, Florida, was shot and killed by neighborhood watchman, George Zimmerman.Since his death, Trayvon’s parents Sybrina Fulton and Tracy Martin have been at the front of the charge to stem the wave of gun violence in the United States – a role they never expected to take on before their son was killed.Across the country, an average of 309 people are shot every day, according to the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence.Zimmerman’s subsequent trial and acquittal transfixed the nation and sparked the rallying cry now called “Black Lives Matter.” Many equate Trayvon’s death as the Emmett Till case for a new generation of activists. Till was a 14-year-old African American from Chicago when he was killed in 1955 for allegedly whistling at a white woman in Mississippi.“I think that Trayvon certainly re-energized a civil rights movement in this country,” Tracy Martin said. “This was a child who lost his life to a senseless act of violence. Gun violence. To someone who wanted to be a vigilante. And so it came to a point where people were just saying ‘enough is enough.’” Sybrina Fulton and Tracy Martin recently penned a powerful memoir called Rest in Power: The Enduring Life of Trayvon Martin, a look back at the son they raised and the tragic event that would change their lives.Trayvon would have been 22 years old this month. His mother said she has her “good days and bad days” when she thinks about him.“I still think about him and cry. I also think about him and smile too,” she said. “If he was still with us, he would be graduating from college this year.”His father described him as “fun, energetic” and an “innovator.”“He was very outgoing. ‘Outdoorsman’ I used to call him,” Martin said. “He loved doing things outdoors, and so just to have his life cut short and taken away from him and not to see him continue to do the things that he liked, it was very devastating.”Six weeks passed before Zimmerman was arrested for Trayvon’s death. He argued he acted in self-defense, citing Florida’s “Stand Your Ground” law, which allows citizens to use deadly force if they feel threatened.The case divided the nation, with many Americans asking, “What if Zimmerman had been black?” Celebrities and citizens alike launched protests and took a stand. The clinched fist that had been a symbol of solidarity during the Civil Rights Movement in 1960s was now the hoodie, like the one Trayvon was wearing the night he was killed.The message eventually made its way to the White House, and President Obama delivered a personal statement about the case, saying, “If I had a son, he’d look like Trayvon.”“Trayvon was dead on the ground at 17, unarmed, and he was given a drug and alcohol test and background check,” Fulton said. “But the person who has shot and killed him, who was still holding the gun … he went home. My son went to the medical examiners and this person went and got in his bed like as if nothing happened.”Fulton and Martin painted a painful picture of the confusion and frustration that immediately followed their son’s death.“When I returned to the residence that night, the crime scene tape had been taken down,” Martin said. “There was no sign of any altercations on the scene. And so … it still isn't clear to me.”They said they weren’t initially given access to their son’s body and he was initially listed as “John Doe.”“We had to fight just to get Trayvon's body back so that we can have the body shipped home,” Fulton said. “We didn't ask for anything that any other parents wouldn't have asked fo
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  • Indiana State Police(DELPHI, Ind.) — Police investigating the slayings of two girls in Indiana released new evidence Wednesday in hopes it will lead to the capture of their killer.The evidence was a video clip captured by one of the victim's cellphones. When police played the audio from the clip at a news conference in the city of Delphi Wednesday morning, reporters heard just three words from a deep voice: "Down the hill."The audio quality is not great, but police said it's enough for someone to recognize the person's voice. Investigators believe this clip recorded criminal behavior that was about to occur."Libby had the presence of mind to turn on her video camera," Capt. David Bursten, chief public information officer of the Indiana State Police, told reporters. "There's no doubt in our minds that that young lady is a hero."The rest of the video will not be released at this time because of the ongoing investigation, Bursten said.The girls — Liberty (Libby) German, 14, and Abigail (Abby) Williams, 13, both of Carroll County — were first reported missing by their families Feb. 13 after they did not return from their hike. After organized searches, the bodies of the two girls were found Feb. 14 outside Delphi in the woods near Deer Creek, about three-quarters of a mile from an abandoned railroad bridge where they were dropped off a day earlier to go hiking. An autopsy revealed their identities."Evidence in this case has led investigators to believe that this is a double homicide and that’s what we’re investigating at this time," Indiana State Police public information officer Sgt. Tony Slocum told reporters Wednesday morning.Indiana State Police on Monday named a man in a photograph as the primary suspect in the double homicide investigation, but nothing is known about him at this time outside of a single image. The man, dressed in blue jeans, a blue jacket and a hoodie, was photographed on a nature trial around the same time the two girls disappeared. Previously, the man had been labeled a person of interest and police said he might only be a witness to the crime."We are actively looking for this person. We believe this person is our suspect," Sgt. Slocum said at the press conference Wednesday morning.Police said there is a possibility of more than one suspect, and it's unclear if the voice heard in the audio clip belongs to the man seen in the photograph.
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  • ABC News(NEW YORK) -- Two male models who were skateboarding in Central Park and paused to take a picture of the sunset ended up saving the lives of seven teenagers who had fallen through ice.“It was all a matter of ‘right place at the right time’ for the two of us,” Ethan Turnbull said Wednesday on ABC News' Good Morning America.Turnbull was with fellow model Bennett Jonas in New York City’s Central Park Monday when, out of the corner of his eye, he spotted a group of teenagers playing on ice atop a pond.“I said to Bennett, ‘Look, man, there’s some kids over there on the ice,’” Turnbull recalled. “Within the time it took me to say that to Bennett and look back, the ice had actually broken because they came together to take a photo.”Turnbull and Jonas rushed to the scene and jumped into the freezing water to pull the teenagers to safety. The teenagers in the water were all boys ages 13 to 17, according to ABC New York City station WABC-TV.“One of the first things I learned as a kid was never give your body to somebody drowning and I learned that the hard way,” Jonas said Wednesday on GMA. “The first two kids I got to heading into the water pulled me under.“They had me completely under the water,” he said. “I had to get them up and get them to [Ethan].”While other eyewitnesses captured Turnbull and Jonas’s heroic efforts on video, the two friends kept working to pull each of the seven boys to the shore.“The only time I was really scared was as I was entering the water … it was chaotic,” Jonas said. “They were pulling each other under [and] just knowing you’re heading into the middle of that and they’re trying to get out as much as you’re trying to get them out.”He added, “You’re their way out so they’re trying to get on top of you, get out any way they can.”One of the victims was hospitalized overnight. The other teens were treated and released, according to WABC.Jonas and Turnbull were not injured during the rescue. Jonas described how the pair survived the “brutal” water temperature.“The adrenaline was so crazy; I don’t think either of us really realized how cold we were until after it all kind of subsided,” he said.
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