• Sacramento Police Department(LOS ANGELES) -- The suspected "Golden State Killer" who was arrested this week for killing and raping dozens of California residents decades ago, seemed shocked to find police outside his home, according to Sacramento County Sheriff's Department official Paul Belli.Joseph James DeAngelo, a 72-year-old former police officer, was taken into custody on Tuesday at his home in Citrus Heights in Sacramento County, the same county where his alleged crime spree began in 1976. The crimes continued across the state until 1986.DeAngelo lived at the home with family but was home alone when he was arrested, Belli told ABC News.DeAngelo told police he had a roast in the oven, and officers said they could take care of it, Belli said.He was placed under arrest without incident.Colleen Fernandez, who lives in DeAngelo's neighborhood, told ABC News, "We walked by that house all the time ... but we never saw him.""I'm just thankful he got caught," Fernandez said. "It's huge for this community. Even though it was 40 years ago, people still remembered."Fernandez lived in the Sacramento area during the years of the "Golden State Killer" crime spree, calling it "a scary time.""I was just a young woman. It was frightening. You'd definitely lock your doors and your windows," she said. "You had buddy system. I worked at a restaurant -- I made sure somebody walked me to my car."Another neighbor, Robin Brown, noticed the police tape at DeAngelo's home but figured he was getting his driveway repaved."We've always felt safe in this neighborhood," she said.DeAngelo is believed to have committed 12 murders, at least 50 rapes and multiple home burglaries in the 1970s and 1980s.His alleged "reign of terror" spanned from the Sacramento area in Northern California down to Orange County in Southern California, Orange County District Attorney Tony Rackauckas said Wednesday.Today, investigators will conduct a methodical, room-by-room search of his home, Belli said.Authorities have a list of items stolen from victims' homes as well as other items connected to crimes, including weapons.DeAngelo was a police officer in Exeter, California, from 1973 to 1976, officials said.In 1976 he served as a police officer in the city of Auburn until he was fired in 1979 for allegedly stealing a hammer and a can of dog repellent, The Associated Press reported, citing Auburn Journal articles from the time.DeAngelo then spent 27 years working for Save Mart Supermarkets at a distribution center in Roseville, near Sacramento, said Victoria Castro, a public affairs manager for Save Mart. He retired last year."None of his actions in the workplace would have lead us to suspect any connection to crimes being attributed to him," Castro said in a statement. "We are working with the Sacramento County District Attorney's Office on their investigation."Last week, DeAngelo's name came up for the first time in the "Golden State Killer" investigation, Sacramento District Attorney Anne Marie Schubert said.DeAngelo was then surveilled and DNA from an item police had collected of his was confirmed as a match.He has not yet appeared in court.
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  • ABCNews.com(MYRTLE BEACH, S.C) -- Surveillance video from the Avista Resort in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, captured the near drowning of a 12-year-old boy who was playing in a lazy river.Hotel security footage from the March 19 incident shows two boys fidgeting with an underwater grate in an attempt to expose the suction pipe below. One boy can be seen repeatedly diving into the water to explore what lies underneath the grate when his leg suddenly becomes lodged between the 6-inch wide pipe.Trapped underwater, the boy’s friend tries to free him. After an unsuccessful attempt he calls for help and bystanders rush to help free the boy. One man was able to administer underwater mouth-to-mouth resuscitation to keep the boy alive until authorities arrived.According to a police report, North Myrtle Beach Police responded to the scene around 10 p.m. Emergency responders can be seen diving into the pool and eventually freeing the boy from his entrapment and dragging him out of the water. The video shows a female officer vigorously pounding on the boy’s chest to keep his heart beating before he is carried away on a stretcher. The boy was underwater for 9 minutes.Once EMS personnel were able to revive the boy he was taken to Grand Strand Medical Center for further treatment, authorities said.North Myrtle Beach public information officer Patrick Dowling told ABC News the boy's family does not want his identity to be released.Further details on the boy’s condition is unknown at this time.No charges have been filed against the resort and no criminal misconduct was found, Dowling said.
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  • J Pat Carter/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- More than 1.4 million public school students were missing classes today as tens of thousands teachers in Arizona and Colorado walked out in a powerful display of frustration over a decade of education funding cuts they say have piled up to billions of dollars.Arizona teachers went on strike after voting overwhelmingly last week to take the drastic move in hopes it will pressure lawmakers into giving them a 20 percent pay hike, fork over a $1 billion in education funding and up the salaries of school support staff.Public educators in Arizona rank 46th in the nation in teacher pay, earning about $12,000 less than the national average of $59,660, according to a 2018 report by the National Education Association.In Colorado, up to 10,000 educators have taken personal leave to rally at their state Capitol in Denver today and tomorrow and lobby legislators to boost funding for education there, which they say has been slashed by a whopping $6.6 billion over the last nine years. The teachers are also demanding no new corporate tax breaks until education funding is restored."We are fed up at this point," Kerrie Dallman, president of the Colorado Education Association, told ABC News this week.The Arizona and Colorado teacher labor actions are just the latest in a wave of educator revolts ignited by West Virginia teachers who went on a nine-day strike earlier this year and won a five percent pay raise in March.Since the West Virginia wildcat strike, teachers in Oklahoma went on a nine-day strike of their own, persuading legislators to up their annual pay an average of $6,000, give support staff a raise and increase funding for education by nearly $500 million. Earlier this month, Kentucky educators walked out of class angry over a pension reform bill they said was passed by legislators without their input and signed into law by their governor despite their vociferous objections.Most of the work actions have occurred in red states where legislatures and governors' offices are dominated by Republicans. Colorado, where Democrats occupy the governor's office and hold a majority in the state Assembly, is the exception.More than 30 school districts in Arizona canceled classes today and may be forced to do the same in days to come as 30,000 to 50,000 striking teachers formed picket lines and threatened to stay out of school for as long as it takes to get lawmakers to meet their demands.An estimated 840,000 public school students in Arizona are missing classes after numerous school district shut down schools because they couldn't find enough substitute teachers to fill in. The same problem occurred in Colorado, where classes were called off for an estimated 600,000 students."We have a fight in front of us," Joe Thomas, president of the Arizona Education Association, told teachers during a rally on Wednesday. "And we want the parents to understand that this fight is for your child. How it ends is up to the governor and up to those legislative leaders."Republican Gov. Doug Ducey has already proposed boosting teacher pay 20 percent by 2020, but educators are concerned over how he plans to pay for it. They say their protest is more than just a paycheck issue and want lawmakers to restore $1 billion in lost funding for education since the national 2008 financial crisis."Without a doubt, teachers are some of the biggest difference-makers in the lives of Arizona children," Ducey said in a Twitter post this morning. "They need to be respected, and rewarded, for the work they do -- and Arizona can do better on this front."We’ve all been listening -- but now, it's time to act," Ducey added. "My number one focus right now is passing a 20% pay raise for Arizona teachers. This raise is earned, and it is deserved... To parents, I understand the pain & pressure caused by today’s strike. I'm working to get this 20% raise passed."In Colorado, teachers wearing #RedforEd T-shirts and toting signs reading "Make
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  • Justin Sullivan/Getty Images(LOS ANGELES) -- The suspected "Golden State Killer" behind serial rapes and murders across California in the 1970s and 1980s has finally been identified.Joseph James DeAngelo, a 72-year-old former police officer, was arrested this week in the decades-old case.His alleged "reign of terror" spanned from the Sacramento area in Northern California down to Orange County in Southern California, Orange County District Attorney Tony Rackauckas said Wednesday. DeAngelo is believed to have committed 12 murders, at least 50 rapes and multiple home burglaries.Here is a closer look at the timeline:1973-1976
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- A woman who police say carried out a calculated plan to kill her husband's mistress brought a trove of items with her including binoculars and ammunition.Jennair Gerardot, 47, of Wilmington, Delaware, knew about her husband's affair with 33-year-old Meredith Chapman of Pennsylvania, according to Radnor Township Police.Gerardot rented a car about two weeks ago in Wilmington and on Monday drove near Chapman's house in Radnor Township, a Philadelphia suburb, and parked on a side street, police said.Gerardot broke into Chapman's house and waited for her to come home, police said. As soon as Chapman walked in the door, Gerardot shot her in the head, police said. Gerardot then turned the gun on herself, shooting herself in the head, according to police.Found inside Gerardot's rental car were binoculars, ammunition, rubber gloves and earplugs, police said, and emails and texts indicated Gerardot's attack was pre-meditated.  Jennair Gerardot's husband, Mark Gerardot, was in the driveway when officers arrived at the scene. He told them, "My wife may be inside," police said.Police said they believe Mark Gerardot was in the area because he had planned to meet Chapman for dinner, and when she didn't arrive, he became concerned and went to her house.  Mark Gerardot worked for the University of Delaware from November 2017 to April 2018 and he left the university earlier this month, University of Delaware spokeswoman Andrea Boyle Tippett said.Chapman worked at the University of Delaware from 2010 to March 2018, Tippett said. She also received her bachelor's degree from the University of Delaware in 2007 and her master's from the university in 2015.  "Everyone who knew and worked with Meredith is heartbroken," Tippett told ABC News via email. "As a proud alumna of UD, her commitment to her work was exceeded only by her boundless energy. She believed earnestly in the power of communication to bring people together, whether to achieve their collective goals or simply to share their stories. We will miss her."Chapman also worked as an assistant vice president of marketing and creative services at Villanova University and ran for the state senate in Delaware in 2016.A former student remembered Chapman as a mentor and role model."She was a vibrant and engaging teacher who went out of her way to help grow the communications careers of students at the university -- young women in particular," the student told ABC News via email."During her 2016 run for district senate a group of students, including myself, helped to support her campaign and she let us know that working with her UD students motivated her to be a better professor and advocate for a stronger education system and job opportunities for the next generation," the student said. "Even though she lost the election, Professor Chapman accepted her loss with grace and utilized it as a teaching moment to inspire us all to take risks and pursue our passions no matter the odds."
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