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Wavebreak Media/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- A nonmedical therapy may be as useful for depressed patients as the "gold standard" of therapy.

According to new research published in The Lancet, Behavioral Activation (BA) is a simple and inexpensive talk therapy that is as effective at treating depression as cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT).

The difference between the two is that BA is "outside-in" (change the way you act outside to change the way you feel inside), and CBT is 'inside-out' (focus on the way a person thinks). Currently, there is limited access to CBT -- it's expensive, has long wait times, and requires trained professionals.

Between 2012 and 2014, researchers at the University of Exeter in the U.K. recruited 440 adults who met the criteria for major depressive disorder. Neither method fared worse than the other in reduction of depression symptoms, and using BA resulted in a financial savings to clinical providers of 21 percent.

Although the study was conducted in the U.K. and may not be generalizable to the U.S., it may be a useful nonmedical therapy for depressed patients with further studies done as well.

Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.


iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) --  A Virginia woman is celebrating after winning big six times in her state lotto.

Donna Boyd-Warren won $150,000 from six winning tickets in Virginia's Cash5 lotto. Each ticket had the same numbers and was worth $25,000.

Boyd-Warren, of North Chesterfield, Virginia, has been in remission from breast cancer for more than five years but lingering nerve pain from chemotherapy has left her unable to work outside the home. She and her husband plan on using the winnings to make repairs around the house and donate to their church and cancer research.

"Life goes on as usual for that I'm happy," she said. "We were blessed with the winnings."

 Boyd-Warren, also a Vietnam-era veteran, said she usually buys lottery tickets twice a week for fun.

"Maybe two times a week I pick six sets of the same numbers," she said. "I look on the lotto online and pick the numbers that happen the most."

Boyd-Warren said she was thankful for the winnings, but that her experience with cancer meant that "most of all I'm thankful to be alive."

Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.


College of Charleston(CHARLESTON, S.C.) -- "What does it mean when the rest of your life may be measured in weeks?"

That's the start of Alison Piepmeier's last column for the Charleston City Paper.

Piepmeier has been battling a brain tumor for seven years, but last month she wrote that her tumor had gotten progressively bigger and she no longer had treatment options. She's currently in hospice care.

But Piepmeier's cancer hasn't stopped her from doing what she loves: writing.

Piepmeier continues to file stories using voice recognition software and help from her mother and husband of two months, Brian McGee.

Piepmeier told ABC News via email that she really wanted to write one last column.

"This column was especially hard to write," she explained. "I've spent years writing about cancer, but also about children, disability, abortion, Down syndrome, homophobia, and other challenging topics. I wanted to finish by writing about things that always matter, but especially those things that matter at the end: love, family, friendship, gratitude, and forgiveness."

"As I feel myself slipping away," she added, "I wanted to say goodbye while I still could."

And Piepmeier, 43, did. She not only mentioned the "many acts of kindness" from family and friends, but also noted "brothers, parents, friends, teachers, students, co-workers, lovers, and readers" and even her editor, Chris Haire. In her goodbye, she also wrote about her daughter Maybelle's "first princess party."

"I am happy, so happy, to have experienced a princess party," she wrote. "I am so sorry there won't be more of them for me, if only because I would never turn down the chance to experience the pure joy of my daughter singing 'Let It Go' over and over."

Even in her final weeks, Piepmeier said she is still looking forward to many of life's joys.

"For the time I have left, I want to be with people I love and who love me," she said. "Because I have so little time left, unfortunately there are more people to see than I can realistically manage. I am sad -- tears are an everyday experience -- but I love being with people who have cared so much for me, who have made my life rich, beautiful, and rewarding."

She added: "I don't presume to know what a next life would be like. I don't even know what to imagine. In a next life, I hope I would be in a place where people would need me, where there is something meaningful to do. A next life without work, without purpose, would be disappointing."

When asked what her legacy might be, Piepmeier replied quite honestly, "Other people get to decide our legacy."

Still, she said she hopes her legacy will live on through her students "at the College of Charleston and at Vanderbilt."

"At the center of my heart, though, are my friends and my family. What I have left them is what matters most to me," she concluded.

Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.


iStock/ThinkstockBy DR. JENNIFER ASHTON, ABC News Senior Medical Contributor

Warmer temperatures are welcome and expected in the summer months. But some parts of the U.S. are seeing dangerously high temperatures, and as the mercury rises, so does the real risk of heat-related illnesses.

The severity of these illnesses range from heat cramps and heat exhaustion to heat stroke and actual hyperthermia. Another potential problem is dehydration. Symptoms of dehydration include dry mouth, increased thirst, headache, weakness, dizziness or nausea.

If you've been in the sun or heat and start to experience symptoms or just don't feel well, stop what you're doing, get out of the sun, drink some water and use cool compresses to relieve symptoms. Remember to take frequent breaks, and try to do as much in the shade as possible.

Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.


iStock/Thinkstock(MIAMI) — This week Florida Health Department officials announced they were investigating two cases of Zika infection in Broward and Miami-Dade Counties — the first time the virus may have been transmitted in the U.S. by mosquitoes.

If the two cases in Florida are confirmed as being locally-acquired Zika, it will likely reach the threshold set by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to label the area as a "local Zika transmission area." The CDC has different guidelines depending on if there is a single case of local transmission or if there is widespread local transmission.

The Florida Health Department has begun issuing Zika prevention kits for pregnant women and is working with mosquito control to reduce the population of mosquitoes in the area where the two people were infected.

In the event of a locally transmitted Zika outbreak, the CDC will advise community health departments to intensify surveillance and mosquito control and reach out to residents to prevent further infections. The CDC will also provide guidance about Zika infection for anyone living in the affected area.

The CDC urges health departments to work with blood donation centers so donor guidelines can be revised to protect the blood supply from Zika-infected infusions.

Dr. William Schaffner, an infectious disease expert at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, told ABC News that mosquito control can help stop an outbreak by significantly reducing the mosquito population. U.S. health officials had anticipated some small local outbreaks of the virus, he said.

"We expect introductions...and we anticipated that there might be some limited spread locally because we can't swat every mosquito," he explained.

Schaffner noted that the CDC can assist health departments with proper testing if needed.

Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.





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