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iStock Editorial/Thinkstock(WEST POINT, N.Y.) --  What started as a lighthearted tradition meant to build camaraderie, transformed into chaos on Aug. 20 when the United States Military Academy at West Point’s annual pillow fight turned bloody, leaving 30 freshmen injured, investigators said Wednesday.

Nicknamed “plebes,” first-year students are responsible for organizing the pillow fight, held almost every year since 2001.

The list of injuries at this past gathering, included a broken nose, fractured cheek and 24 concussions.

The investigators stated in the report, that one cadet was knocked unconscious before the pillow fight ended and was treated by a certified emergency medical technician.

The unconscious student may have been the victim of what is called a “Blue Falcon” move. A maneuver where cadets are hit from behind and knocked to the ground, the investigation explained.

 “Many injuries were the result of cadets having been hit by elbows or other body parts during the scuffle of the pillow fight or from simply falling or being knocked to the ground,” the report said, adding that several participants wore body armor and helmets to the fight.

But, military police say that one cadet is facing discipline after he was seen striking another with a hard object inside a pillow case. The victim of his crime did not receive medical attention at the time, the release stated.

Administrators listed on the report said, the event will no longer take place because of insufficient planning, lack of supervision from upper class men and insufficient communication by academy leaders.

Both senior military members and cadets will be punished for failing to live by the army’s values, the release said.

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Photodisc/ThinkstockBy DR. JENNIFER ASHTON, ABC News Senior Medical Contributor

Ovaries make cysts for a living, but when is a cyst suspicious for cancer?

Ovarian cancer is called the "silent killer" because it can produce vague symptoms that often go ignored by either the doctor or the woman, delaying the diagnosis until it's at an advanced stage.

All women should be aware of the symptoms. They include pelvic pain or pressure, increase in urination and bloating.

If you feel any of these symptoms for two weeks or more, talk to your gynecologist.

Here are my top things to know about ovarian cancer:

New data shows it mostly starts in the fallopian tube.

Birth control pills dramatically reduce your risk of ovarian cancer over your lifetime.

Just having an ovarian cyst doesn't necessarily mean that you have ovarian cancer.

Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Courtesy Jason Henley(NEW YORK) -- In September, Jason Henley, a UPS driver, made a life-saving delivery to Greg Hall, a man he barely knew.

Hall, 31, had often signed for deliveries at a UPS store on Henley's route in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. In 2014, when Henley noticed Hall's absence at the store, he asked about it. He eventually learned that Hall, a father and husband, had been diagnosed with kidney failure, was on dialysis and needed a transplant.

"Being a UPS driver gives me the opportunity to come into contact with a lot of people," Henley, 35, said. "I got to know [Greg] as an acquaintance over a month or so period. ... so when I got to know Greg and immediately heard that he was sick. ... [I thought,] 'How can I help him in that?' ... The only thing I knew was his last name and where he worked."

Henley, also a husband and father, said he got tested, found out that he was a match and decided that he was going to donate his kidney to Hall.

"I blew him off at first, thinking why would you want to give me a kidney," Hall said.

Ten weeks after surgery, both men said that they were thankful and that during the process, they'd also become pretty good friends. In fact, Hall and Henley also learned that they shared the same birthday.
"I don't know how many times I've told him, 'Thank you,'" Hall said Wednesday. "It's a whole new life. ... Life is great."

Hall said, he'd recently gotten the doctor's OK to return to work and Henley said that he planned to go back to work after Christmas.

"If I was able to do this all over again, I would," Henley said. "I have been more blessed during this entire process, more than I could have imagined."

"That's my brother right here," Hall said.

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Courtesy Julian McDonald(NEW YORK) -- During her deployment in Afghanistan, U.S. military combat dog, Layka, saved many lives and now some of them are helping save hers.

Layka, a Belgian Malinois, lost one of her front legs when she was shot four times during an ambush in Afghanistan in 2013. Despite her wounds, the dog managed to save the soldiers from an attacker inside the building she was sent to clear.

Now 5 years old and adopted by her Afghanistan handler, U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Julian McDonald, Layka faces the possibility of losing her remaining front paw from a bad ATV jump earlier this fall.

"It's a big injury because she only has one leg," said Rebecca Switzer of Oklahoma, who met Layka and her handler at an event more than a year ago. "She struggled along with one leg and now her other leg is in jeopardy."

Switzer and her husband have been helping Layka get the care she needs since 2014, the year they met her and raised funds to get the dog a prosthetic leg. When she was injured this year, they again jumped in and helped get her to the University of Tennessee's Veterinary Hospital, where she's being treated for her broken paw.

"We love animals and we help a lot of animals,but she's a hero, she saved our troops," Switzer told ABC News. "She didn't ask to go in, she was trained to go in. We're just enamored with her and what she has been through in her deployment."

Many of the donors for both fundraising campaigns are some of the soldiers she helped save during that ambush while in combat, Switzer said. It'll be a long road to recovery for the "hero dog."

"Before her second injury, she could still attack," Switzer said, adding that Layka will have to live a calmer life from now on. "She still has a lot of rehab to do."

Layka's injuries are not only physical, she still gets on edge when hearing loud noises.

"That for her means something else," Switzer said, comparing the sound of firecrackers to that of gunfire.

When she gets better, Layka will return to her handler. Attempts to contact the former ranger were unsuccessful, but in April he told ABC News Layka is "kind of my rock."

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Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

AlexRaths/iStock/ThinkStock(NEW YORK) -- The pharmaceutical company that came under fire for raising the price of the anti-parasite drug Daraprim says it will significantly lower the drug cost for hospitals, but not the overall list price.

Daraprim, a drug by Turing Pharmaceuticals used to treat toxoplasmosis, had a list price of $750 per dose as of October 2015 -- up from $18 per pill before Turing Pharmaceuticals bought the drug in August.

Turing CEO Martin Shkreli, under fire for jacking up the price, had said back in September that he would lower it, but did not give details at the time.

However, on Tuesday, Nancy Retzlaff, Turing's Chief Commercial Officer, pledged that no patient would be denied the drug based on their inability to pay and announced various price cuts to hospitals.

"Combined with our robust patient access programs, this is an important step in our commitment to ensure ready access to Daraprim at the lowest possible out-of-pocket cost for both hospitals and patients," Retzlaff said in a statement  Tuesday. "We pledge that no patient needing Daraprim will ever be denied access."

The company has a hotline for patients who want access to the drug. More than 60 million people carry the parasite that causes toxoplasmosis, however the vast majority will not require treatment because their immune systems are strong enough.

Daraprim is not the only drug available to treat toxoplasmosis and the CDC has a list of the different drugs that can be used to treat the disease.

The drug's price for hospitals will be cut by 50 percent, physicians will get sample packages for free, and the company will participate in federal and state programs where the drug will be available for as low as $1 per 100 dose bottle, Turing says. These account for approximately two-thirds of Daraprim sales, according to Turing Pharmaceuticals.

However, the list price, which affects how much the pills cost at a pharmacy, will not change. The company has not responded to repeated requests for clarification on the list price since October.

"Drug pricing is one of the most complex parts of the healthcare industry," Retzlaff said in a statement. "A drug's list price is not the primary factor in determining patient affordability and access. A reduction in Daraprim's list price would not translate into a benefit for patients."

However, the company said that with programs to help patients pay for the drug, there should be no more than $10 in out of pocket costs.

The company says they have multiple programs so that patients are not priced out of buying the drug including working with Medicaid, federal and state discount drug programs and providing the drug free to uninsured patients who are at or below 500 percent of the federal poverty level with the patient assistance program.

Karen Andersen, a senior biotech analyst at the investment research firm Morningstar, told ABC News in an earlier interview shortly after Shkreli pledged to lower the cost, that the new cost will reflect multiple factors in how the drug is made and marketed.

"Shkreli will likely consider the cost of manufacturing, the number of patients who will take the drug, and any marketing costs," Andersen said. "I would not expect the future price of Daraprim to subsidize the firm's R&D investments, particularly considering that the drug was not a product of their R&D investment. ... In this particular case, pricing is likely to become more a matter of public opinion than anything else."

Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

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