Quantcast
WJBD - Health & Fitness News

WJBD Radio

Images


Advertisement
Advertisements

Hemera/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Over 15,000 cards have been mailed to Danny Nickerson, the 5-year-old battling cancer who is turning 6 Friday.

The Massachusetts boy was diagnosed with an inoperable brain tumor known as diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma in October, one of the most chemotherapy-resistant cancers. Danny has since stopped going to kindergarten.

All this little boy wanted for his upcoming birthday were lots of cards with his name on them, Danny’s mother, Carley Nickerson, told ABC News last Friday

His wish has been heard and granted.

Since ABC News first reported on Danny’s story, the family’s P.O. Box has been flooded with cards and packages from strangers across the country and even outside the United States.

Carley Nickerson says she has received messages from as far as Switzerland, Germany, Australia, Austria, California, Alaska, Norway and Sweden, asking her how to send Danny a card or sending him prayers.

“Today’s total rough count was a little over 8500 cards and 900 packages!!!” Nickerson wrote on a Facebook page he set up for Danny Tuesday.

“We are speechless and don’t have enough words to explain how thankful we are for everyone of you,” Nickerson continued.

It took the family three cars and one rented truck to bring all the cards and packages back home.

“We opened about 200 of them today and he loved seeing them,” Carley Nickerson wrote. “One had a picture of fat cat on it and another with a cat blowing out candles and he laughed so hard at them!”

One man, Matt Sfara of Newton, Massachusetts, decided that he has to make his card stand out, Carley Nickerson noted on Facebook.

Sfara made a card that is 4-feet wide and 6-feet tall when folded, and 8-feet wide when opened up. The card was addressed to “Danny Nickerson, The Coolest 6 Year Old.”

The number of followers on the Facebook page, Danny’s Warrior, skyrocketed to 27,594 Thursday from 2,500 last week.

All cards can be mailed the Nickerson’s home address: Danny Nickerson, P.O. Box 212, Foxboro, Massachusetts, 02035.

His family has also set up a website and a GoFundMe page, which has already reached its $15,000 goal.


Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio


iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- The recent flurry of air disasters does little to comfort nervous fliers, who suffer from what some experts call a “perfect storm” of fears.

“You start with fear, and then you have evidence that the fear is correct,” said George Everly, a psychologist at Johns Hopkins Medical Center in Baltimore. “What makes it over the top is when you don’t know why the airplane crashed.”

Just on Thursday, an Air Algerie airliner carrying 116 people disappeared from radar over Mali. The incident comes one week after a Malaysia Airlines jet carrying 298 people was shot down over Ukraine, and four months after Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 went missing en route from Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia to Beijing with 237 people on board.

Experts say the string of disasters and mysteries is understandably rattling nerves.

“They understand that it is a risk, but what they are doing is blowing it out of proportion,” Everly said, who stressed the risk of a crash was less than “one in a million.”

But despite its impressive safety record, air travel presents a “perfect storm of different fears,” according to Martin Seif, a psychologist at White Plain’s Hospital’s Anxiety and Phobia Treatment Center.

“Fear of heights, social anxiety, claustrophobia,” Seif said. “You can go on and on and on.”

And when there’s a disaster, those fears are amplified, Seif said. “You’ll get temporary increase whenever there’s a catastrophe,” he said.

For those who fear flying, experts say a few simple steps can help curb anxiety. To start, avoid dwelling on the media coverage, Seif said.

“There’s a general rule of thumb: read it once and don’t replay it,” he said, adding that avoiding the news altogether is no better than bingeing. “If you imagine what happened, you’re going to be worse than if you read it.”

But missing flights and unexplained crashes can add another layer of anxiety for wary air travelers, according to Everly.

“If they have to fly, they want as much knowledge of possible so they can build a safety net or defense,” he said, explaining that some nervous fliers might choose to avoid routes involved in the disasters.


Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio


iStock/Thinkstock(HALF MOON BAY, Calif.) -- A California man's death after being trapped inside a collapsed sand tunnel is drawing attention to sand safety as America's summer tourism season swings into full gear.

Adam Pye, 26, died Monday at Francis State Beach. He dug a 10-foot-deep hole and climbed into it, when the tunnel collapsed.

“The girls came out of their tunnel, his tunnel caved in and they turned around and said, “where’s Adam, where’s Adam?’” said Kevin Pye, the victim’s father.

Dozens of beach-goers frantically used their hands, buckets, anything they could, trying to get to Pye.

But it was too late.

The death was especially difficult for Pye’s relatives given his recent college graduation.

“He graduated to say, ‘Mom, finally, now I have some time, I can rest,’” said his mother, Debra Pye.

Similar situations have been reported on American beaches in previous years. In 2011, it took firefighters 27 minutes to rescue Matt Mina, then 17, in Huntington Beach, California, after the walls of a sand tunnel collapsed on him.

“I went to sleep. I thought I was gonna die,” Mina said later.

A 12-year-old New Jersey boy died in 2012 after becoming trapped in a tunnel he dug with his brother.

Sand’s crumbling, shifting nature contributes to the hazards of cave-ins. Victims such as Pye have been covered in seconds, the sand making it difficult to breathe.

Safety experts say beach-goers should keep two things in mind when digging a hole at the beach -- to keep the hole about knee-deep at most and to cover the hole before you leave the beach.


ABC News | More ABC News Videos


Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio


Ronald Martinez/Getty Images(LINCOLN, Neb.) -- Does grunting serve a purpose on the tennis court other than to psych out one’s opponent?

Maria Sharapova is one of the loudest grunters in the game, making guttural sounds described as loud as a chain saw. Granted, she is one of the hardest hitters in tennis, but Sharapova also seems to be helping her serve by grunting, a University of Nebraska study speculates.

In fact, when players on the University of Nebraska college tennis team grunted, scientists discovered the ball speed picked up by 3.8 percent. They explained the upper body becomes more stable during grunts, which enables a player to transfer more power to the arm.

The extra velocity is particularly helpful because it gives opponents less time to set up their return shots.

The researchers also noted that improvement was almost instantaneous when grunting was added to the college players' game, suggesting that people with lesser tennis skills might also benefit from a loud grunt.

Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio


iStock/Thinkstock(ITHACA, N.Y.) -- All those lectures about finishing your dinner because there are kids starving somewhere else evidently sunk in as most adults apparently finish what's on their plates.

And it’s not just Americans who are polishing off their plates of food. People in other countries also belong to what Cornell University researchers are branding the Clean Plate Club.

Study co-authors Brian Wansink and Katherine Abowd Johnson says that in their survey of diners from the U.S., Canada, France, Taiwan, Korea, Finland, and the Netherlands, the average adult will consume about 92 percent of what’s on their plate.

Johnson explains, “Part of why we finish most of what we serve is because we are aware enough to know how much we'll want in the first place.”

However, before we start patting ourselves on the backs for not wasting food, the same doesn’t hold true for those under 18.

In an accompanying study, Wansink and Johnson found out that younger eaters only managed to finish 59 percent of what’s on their plate, mostly because they’re unfamiliar with some of the food.

If there’s any consolation to parents, according to the researchers, it’s that it seems to be a universal thing among younger children and adolescents.


Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio





Welcome to Our New Website

Same WJBD but with more content than ever before. We will have more features up and running in no time.


Follow Us At

This Site logo